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Old 12-22-2013, 08:14 PM   #21
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It's my opinion that by definition a true trawler is on a pure full displacement hull. Apparently, in todays marketing anything can be called something else if it sells better. Trawlers are "in" , even if a true trawler is not what the buyer needs. The term swift trawler comes to mind. Semi displacement, is that not a contradictory term, possibly meaning displacement by association, displacement but faster, I dont know. The correct term is semi planing. A displacement hull by design will not plane, the only way to make it go faster with more power is to raise the topsides because eventually, given enough power, they will be under water.
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Old 12-23-2013, 08:06 AM   #22
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Well, it is definitely true that some members here are closer to the trawler DNA than others.

However, even the more distant relatives seem happy to be members of the Trawler Forum, and are welcomed as such. We are a broad church so perhaps we shouldn't be holier than thou if some broker pushes the trawler boundary further than we think proper.

You never know there might be a real-life trawler skipper reading this and snorting with laughter.

To paraphrase George Orwell, All trawlers are created equal, however some are more equal than others.
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Old 12-23-2013, 11:41 AM   #23
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Nowadays trawler seems to be more of a state of mind or a lifestyle than a hull configuration. The term brings out thoughts of saltyness or maritime knowledge. Slow and stately, etc. I do think that most folks that have boats that are not PFD would go crazy with a top speed of 9 knots. We all say that we love the slow lane, but I find myself easing the throttles forward a bit "cause a little more speed wont hurt anything". My sportfisher feels good at about 10 knots, which is well above the hull speed of around 8.5 and very inneficcient. At that speed I get about 1 mpg. At 7 knots I can get about 2 mpg. So for 3 extra mph I double my fuel usage. Doesnt make much sence but I find myself doing it anyway. My trawler has a top speed of 9 knots and I almost always run it at less than 8. It feels good at that speed. 9 knots just feels "hectic" or kinda pushing it. I attribute it to the differences between a boat that can go faster and a boat that can't. Most folks I talk to with fast boats do the same as me, 10 knots. Of course, if they're in a hurry they may be running 20 or better, me to. That is not an option with a PFD hull. So it's probably easier to sell a motor yacht type as a trawler than it is to sell a trawler as a trawler, most folks want the ability to go faster.
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Old 12-23-2013, 12:47 PM   #24
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I hate that moniker "trawler lifestyle". Boating style yes.

The three elements wer'e talking here is hulls, cabins and skippers.

If you're going to go trawlering at hull speed you better NOT do it w a full disp boat. Going hull speed requires a semi planing hull. One must plane to some small degree to go forth at hull speed w any degree of grace and efficiency. A semi planing hull is required. So displacement trawlers are limited to at least 1/2 a knot below HS. One full knot is better and more than that w bigger boats.

Very few of us are willing to limit their speed to that level. Most seem to think they need to outrun weather (and that they can) and buck currents so they come close to normal cruising speeds. It's a state of mind that keeps most out of and away from FD boats.

So most all trawlers are semi planing. Semi planing or semi disp means basically the same thing but most all trawler skippers don't want to see the word "planing" in the description of their boat. But semi planing fits. Face it or ... get a grip (as they say) but once you exceed HS you are to some degree planing. Partly planing or "semi planing". And if your hull is suited to that (and most all on this forum certainly are) they are planing to some degree.
And at the other end of the semi category (semi disp) if your hull has some rocker aft at some speed your boat will become bow high and lack directional control. But/so to some degree those hulls are semi (partly) like a displacement hull. Semi displacement. Some will argue this about words but the physics is all the same. Planing and displacement hulls are not flexible. Their design is to do one thing well and they do. The semi hulls do more but they do not do full disp well ... only fairly well. And the semi hulls do planing only at low speeds. That's what I think Kulas44 is (I think) talking about. He's talking about a pure breed of trawler yacht and that is of course a yacht that resembles a north sea fishing "trawler". And that is the bottom line. If our boats resemble a NS trawler they are trawler yachts .... or now just trawlers.

So there is the boat and the skipper w his boating style. Many trawlermen don't have hulls that resemble NS trawlers but the boat as a whole DOES. So it's a trawler. Camano trawlers basically have planing hulls but they resemble NS trawlers as much as most trawlers so overall (as usually seen) they are trawlers. And we have more skippers here w planing hulls than FD hulls and if they boat like us we fully embrace them as equals. I do.

But the trawler non trawler thing does occasionally go over the top as when Sea Dory advertised their outboards as "trailerable trawlers". I think they made fools of themselves there but probably sold a few more boats. But if you took your Sea Dory on a trip and stayed at about HS does the boat become a trawler? Certainly not if you run an hour at 20 knots. But how can a light planing OB boat be called a trawler? Lots of Sea Dory people have done a lot of trawler like boating.

The more I try to pin it down the more grey area I find.

But basically trawlers are heavy cruisers w diesel power. Notice that my basic description says nothing about full disp hulls.


And if I were to identify the most trawler like boat on this forum I'd say it is Marks Coot. I can think of no other hull here that resembles a north sea trawler more closely. And as far as I can remember none of us has an aft wheelhouse.
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Old 12-23-2013, 01:51 PM   #25
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Appreciate the perspective "many boats" (Eric). That's why I joined TF; to get a broad spectrum of knowledge from other's experiences. (While trying to step around the other than well-intentioned opinions). Always lots to learn, regardless of age or experience.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:43 PM   #26
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Trawler vs. Trawler

There is a neat computer tool called OneLook Dictionary that I resort to when I want to know what a word means. Through the first 15 definitions the information is pretty much the same; it is the use to which the boat is put which determines whether or not it is a "trawler". A trawler drags a trawl. In the encyclopedia discussions below, there is reference to modern high horsepower trawlers, so engine size isn't necessarily a factor. In none of the definitions is there a reference to hull or speed but the Wikipedia discussion talks about both displacement and other hulls. In reality when talking about recreational boats, what I think we are talking about is whether a boat is a trawler style. I don't recall seeing one or two boats on this site rigged and used as a trawler, but if there are, they are trawlers. I am not sure that an aft cabin boat of any hull shape is a true trawler style boat--where would you put the net? Just say'in

World English Dictionary
trawler (ˈtrɔːlə) n 1. a vessel used for trawling 2. a person who trawls


Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source


Encyclopedia
trawler
fishing vessel that uses a trawl, a conical net that snares fish by being dragged through the water or along the bottom. Trawlers vary according to the method of towing the net. On side trawlers, the trawl is set and hauled over the side with power winches or manually by a large crew. Outrigger trawlers (a type that includes shrimp boats) drag one or two nets from long booms extending from each side. Stern trawlers are powerful vessels that are often built with ramps for hauling heavy catches up the stern onto the working deck. Powered by engines of up to 5,000 horsepower, modern trawlers drag huge nets that must be hauled by rope winches and large net drums or reels. Large trawlers can be floating factories, cleaning and freezing the fish for processing ashore.

Here's what Wikipedia says

Recreational trawler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Trawler (boat))
Jump to: navigation, search
For the fishing boat, see fishing trawler.

Kadey-Krogen 42' cruising trawler


Recreational trawlers are pleasure boats which resemble fishing trawlers. They can also be called cruising trawlers or trawler yachts. Within the category, however, are many types and styles of vessels.
A fishing trawler for example, always has a displacement hull for load-carrying capacity. Recreational trawlers, on the other hand, are as likely to have a semi-displacement hull. However, with the rising cost of fuel and the lower fuel consumption (though also lower speed) offered by displacement hulls, they are gaining popularity among some buyers. These displacement models typically have a cruising speed of 7-9 knots depending on the boat length. Their maximum speed is often no more than 10-12 knots, whereas semi-displacement hulls can attain 14-20 knots.
Details[edit]


Nordhavn 47 foot Yacht underway



North Pacific 43 ft. Pilothouse trawler yacht


Recreational trawlers are also subject to fashion. For example many USA production recreational trawlers have a style which includes features such as a raised pilothouse or offset deckhouse.
A popular feature is a "portuguese bridge" which consists of a walkway behind the foredeck, in front and to the sides of, the pilothouse windows, separated from the foredeck by a (generally) waist-high bulwark. The purpose of the bridge is to deflect green water from the foredeck up over the superstructure top rather than slamming against the forward windows of the pilothouse. It gives a semi-sheltered area outside the pilothouse while underway. A secondary benefit is that it provides a "safe area" or handhold when it is necessary to be on the foredeck in inclement weather. And lastly, it provides additional storage space for lines, fire extinguisher, spare anchor, drogue, etc. if the builder has provided access doors and lockers on the inside of the bridge.
Trawlers are most often offered in lengths ranging from 35 to 60 feet (or more) long. Most are built for long term cruising of regional and worldwide destinations. Combined with large fuel tanks they can cruise far before needing to be refuelled. They can be home for between 2 to 8 persons for many days and can be a permanent home.
Usually trawlers have a single engine, though twin engine installations are also available from some builders. They have a large fuel capacity. Fuel range is normally 1,500-3,000 miles on smaller vessels, even greater for those over 45 ft in length. When combined with the slower speeds of a displacement hull, these features give such vessels far greater range and economy than similarly sized planing boats. A large engine room under the main cabin is another feature of true cruising trawlers. Many also include a diesel generator of 5-20 kW to power domestic appliances, bow thrusters, dinghy cranes, and similar equipment.
In the United States recreational trawlers are catered for by over 70 builders and manufacturers.


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Old 12-23-2013, 05:00 PM   #27
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Poach,
Good post but I'd rather see your opinion and Wikipedia has trawlers and passagemakers mixed up as do some members on this forum. While talking about trawlers they shouldn't reference a boat w a photograph of some other type. Nordhavn's aren't even trawlers so using them as an example is either in poor taste or through ignorance.

However the rest of what wikipedia says seems quite good.

Also I suspect trawlers more often than not have twin engines.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:09 PM   #28
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I'd love to know who's mixed up and not.........
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:38 PM   #29
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Poach,
Good post but I'd rather see your opinion and Wikipedia has trawlers and passagemakers mixed up as do some members on this forum. While talking about trawlers they shouldn't reference a boat w a photograph of some other type. Nordhavn's aren't even trawlers so using them as an example is either in poor taste or through ignorance.

However the rest of what wikipedia says seems quite good.

Also I suspect trawlers more often than not have twin engines.

yup--it's a mixed up world allright.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:31 PM   #30
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I suspect trawlers more often than not have twin engines.
Experience here is most (real) commercial trawlers have singles. Part of boat operator learning is watching them dock at the Sydney Fish Markets, single, no thruster, just trawlerman boat handling skills on display.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:51 PM   #31
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Experience here is most (real) commercial trawlers have singles. Part of boat operator learning is watching them dock at the Sydney Fish Markets, single, no thruster, just trawlerman boat handling skills on display.
Cool to watch a good single handler to be sure. I love watching a good boat handler, twin, single, thruster or not. Sometimes just for that, I go to the Ballard Locks to watch the good, the bad and the ugly. I always learn something.
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Old 12-23-2013, 08:57 PM   #32
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Eric, no matter how much you hate the term "trawler lifestyle" really sums it up best IMO. Brings to mind a slow and easy pace as much as a commercial fish boat dragging nets to me. But then again Monterey Trollers are what I mostly associate a commercial fish boat looking like.

I see a lot of 38-47 foot Bayliner boats in my area and some guys have them up on plane while others poke along slowly. Motor yacht lifestyle and trawler yacht lifestyle all played out on the same model boat?

As to a Camano looking like a trawler, not to me. I'm perhaps the only guy on this forum who dislikes them based on exterior aesthetics alone. But then again why not call them trawlers as many guys call Bayliners trawlers, at least on Yachtworld. All of this from a guy that owns a 25 knot planing hull.
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Old 12-23-2013, 09:09 PM   #33
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In your search, zero in on a manufacture name instead of the word "trawler". We never refer to our boat as a trawler....
Ray, at least you have fishing gear aboard unlike me.

We use the term "trawler" loosely here. It's most any boat with complete living accommodations (eating, sleeping, evacuating).

Define specifically what you want out from a boat and then search for her. It definitely helps to have previous boating experience to know what works for you.

(And I happily travel mostly at six-something knots, and unable to do much more.)
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Old 12-24-2013, 12:11 AM   #34
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Craig the thing I dislike about the expression "trawler lifestyle" is that it's so silly in that there's no such thing. The inference is that if you have a trawler your lifestyle becomes special. Hogwash. Yo're just a boater like other boaters .. except that you are slow.

Boating isn't a lifestyle Craig .. it's just a hobby.
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Old 12-24-2013, 12:20 AM   #35
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Eric, too bad you haven't had the opportunity to have a face-to-face conversation with Craig. Doubt you would have meaningful differences of opinions.

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Old 12-24-2013, 12:26 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by Poach View Post
There is a neat computer tool called OneLook Dictionary that I resort to when I want to know what a word means. Through the first 15 definitions the information is pretty much the same; it is the use to which the boat is put which determines whether or not it is a "trawler". A trawler drags a trawl. In the encyclopedia discussions below, there is reference to modern high horsepower trawlers, so engine size isn't necessarily a factor. In none of the definitions is there a reference to hull or speed but the Wikipedia discussion talks about both displacement and other hulls. In reality when talking about recreational boats, what I think we are talking about is whether a boat is a trawler style. I don't recall seeing one or two boats on this site rigged and used as a trawler, but if there are, they are trawlers. I am not sure that an aft cabin boat of any hull shape is a true trawler style boat--where would you put the net? Just say'in World English Dictionary trawler (ˈtrɔːlə) http://dictionary.reference.com/help..._pron_key.html— n 1. a vessel used for trawling 2. a person who trawls Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition 2009 William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009 Cite This Source Encyclopedia trawler fishing vessel that uses a trawl, a conical net that snares fish by being dragged through the water or along the bottom. Trawlers vary according to the method of towing the net. On side trawlers, the trawl is set and hauled over the side with power winches or manually by a large crew. Outrigger trawlers (a type that includes shrimp boats) drag one or two nets from long booms extending from each side. Stern trawlers are powerful vessels that are often built with ramps for hauling heavy catches up the stern onto the working deck. Powered by engines of up to 5,000 horsepower, modern trawlers drag huge nets that must be hauled by rope winches and large net drums or reels. Large trawlers can be floating factories, cleaning and freezing the fish for processing ashore. Here's what Wikipedia says Recreational trawler From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Trawler (boat)) Jump to: navigation, search For the fishing boat, see fishing trawler. Kadey-Krogen 42' cruising trawler Recreational trawlers are pleasure boats which resemble fishing trawlers. They can also be called cruising trawlers or trawler yachts. Within the category, however, are many types and styles of vessels. A fishing trawler for example, always has a displacement hull for load-carrying capacity. Recreational trawlers, on the other hand, are as likely to have a semi-displacement hull. However, with the rising cost of fuel and the lower fuel consumption (though also lower speed) offered by displacement hulls, they are gaining popularity among some buyers. These displacement models typically have a cruising speed of 7-9 knots depending on the boat length. Their maximum speed is often no more than 10-12 knots, whereas semi-displacement hulls can attain 14-20 knots. Details[edit] Nordhavn 47 foot Yacht underway North Pacific 43 ft. Pilothouse trawler yacht Recreational trawlers are also subject to fashion. For example many USA production recreational trawlers have a style which includes features such as a raised pilothouse or offset deckhouse. A popular feature is a "portuguese bridge" which consists of a walkway behind the foredeck, in front and to the sides of, the pilothouse windows, separated from the foredeck by a (generally) waist-high bulwark. The purpose of the bridge is to deflect green water from the foredeck up over the superstructure top rather than slamming against the forward windows of the pilothouse. It gives a semi-sheltered area outside the pilothouse while underway. A secondary benefit is that it provides a "safe area" or handhold when it is necessary to be on the foredeck in inclement weather. And lastly, it provides additional storage space for lines, fire extinguisher, spare anchor, drogue, etc. if the builder has provided access doors and lockers on the inside of the bridge. Trawlers are most often offered in lengths ranging from 35 to 60 feet (or more) long. Most are built for long term cruising of regional and worldwide destinations. Combined with large fuel tanks they can cruise far before needing to be refuelled. They can be home for between 2 to 8 persons for many days and can be a permanent home. Usually trawlers have a single engine, though twin engine installations are also available from some builders. They have a large fuel capacity. Fuel range is normally 1,500-3,000 miles on smaller vessels, even greater for those over 45 ft in length. When combined with the slower speeds of a displacement hull, these features give such vessels far greater range and economy than similarly sized planing boats. A large engine room under the main cabin is another feature of true cruising trawlers. Many also include a diesel generator of 5-20 kW to power domestic appliances, bow thrusters, dinghy cranes, and similar equipment. In the United States recreational trawlers are catered for by over 70 builders and manufacturers.
I spy N4712!
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Old 12-24-2013, 01:19 AM   #37
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Eric and I agree on far more than we disagree on and the rest, we just agree to disagree on. It's all fly stuff anyway

If he puts that Willard back in the water I may have to make a drive up to Washington for a cup of coffee and a boat tour. There's a few boats owned by forum members on my bucket list to visit in person, and Willy and Eric are on that list.
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Old 12-24-2013, 01:31 AM   #38
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...

If he puts that Willard back in the water I may have to make a drive up to Washington for a cup of coffee and a boat tour. There's a few boats owned by forum members on my bucket list to visit in person, and Willy and Eric are on that list.
Hoping to see photos of that!
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Old 12-24-2013, 01:49 AM   #39
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... So displacement trawlers are limited to at least 1/2 a knot below HS. One full knot is better and more than that w bigger boats. ...
As a former sailboater, watching the Coot's six-knot speed looks "rapid" when looking down from the pilothouse to observe the water passing.

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Old 12-24-2013, 06:15 PM   #40
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We'll if you think trawlers only have full displacement hulls look on trawler forum and see that 95% of the boats represented are not full displacement. There is the odd trawler that is full displacement though.
Eric - You hit another nail on the head! My relatively fast planing hulled Tollycraft is surely NOT a Trawler (speed at WOT depends on engines' HP; my twin screw Tolly reaches 21 + knots). I belong to TF simply because some great boat owners (such as you) post here. And, this Forum is a great place to learn and maybe even teach a bit - best as possible, that is! lol TF is also great for newbies who really want to become acquainted with boats and boating.

Personally I believe the word "Trawler" when used to describe any pleasure boat is completely incorrect... But who am I to say!

IMHO - Although the word Trawler has been expanded in definition in Q1 of 21st Century... The following is what I grew up knowing as definition of a Trawler and I'm a sticken to it!

Fishing trawler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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