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Old 07-05-2012, 11:56 AM   #61
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I've never heard of Foggman, but that is indeed an attractive boat. I'm a little surprised that they don't provide any pictures of the interior - I'd like to see the quality of the joinery

As others have said, with a fiberglass covering it is unlikely to plane so that 14 kts is a fantasy.

I mention a lot of books, but there's one that is particularly relevant to this boat: "Covering Wooden Boats with Fiberglass" by Allan Vaitses. The book was written in 1981 and covered the author's 15 years of experience doing exactly that, mostly with Maine lobster boats though he does mention a Rybovich that he RE-fiberglassed and a few other yachts.

I talked to the author a few times in the mid-80s when I was considering covering my 32' Monk cruiser. I started with replacing the canvas covering over the saloon cabin top and used matt and roving, fastened with stainless steel staples. I also changed his technique of laying up wet, and then fastening - I laid up dry and fastened first before saturating. I'm not an accomplished craftsman, but the job turned out quite well - it just took an enormous amount of time so I decided against covering the hull. In the 90s I ended up spending $10K (the value of the boat) rebuilding the transom, and a subsequent owner spent about that redoing much of the hull in the following decade.

If you are seriously intersted in this boat, you should source a copy of the book and learn about terminating the covering, finishing tecnhiques, et cetera. One warning sign I see is that they didn't also cover the decks, the biggest source of the fresh-water intrusion that will ruin a wood boat.

Most fiberglass coverings that I have seen failed have used cloth, which IMHO has no place on a boat (Vaitses cautions against it as well). If the covering on this boat is substantial, you might get many years of use from this boat.

If the fiberglass covering scares you off but you are comfortable with a wood boat, you might look at the old Grand Banks 32 woodies - here's one from 1970 located in RI for $38K:
1970 Grand Banks Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Are you saying fiberglass cloth has no place on a boat?
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Old 07-05-2012, 12:10 PM   #62
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Are you saying fiberglass cloth has no place on a boat?
Yes, that's what I said - but I was planning on going back and editing that to say CSM below the waterline. Sorry, brain fart.

update: Argh, I really shouldn't have made a blanket statement like that anyway. There are a lot of factors that go into a structural laminate, and throughly saturating cloth is one of them. And CSM being somewhat porous is another. And so on. Nevermind.
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Old 07-05-2012, 12:18 PM   #63
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Yes, that's what I said - but I was planning on going back and editing that to say CSM below the waterline. Sorry, brain fart.
You mean no chopped strand mat below the waterline????
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Old 07-05-2012, 12:20 PM   #64
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You mean no chopped strand mat below the waterline????
Yes, it can promote osmotic blistering:
Buying a Boat or Yacht : Buying a Blister Boat
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Old 07-05-2012, 01:42 PM   #65
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Yes, it can promote osmotic blistering:
Buying a Boat or Yacht : Buying a Blister Boat
I know...just ground off my bottom...could peel large sections of CSM off by hand...and put back 6oz cloth with epoxy and 8 gallons of interprotect 2000
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Old 07-05-2012, 01:56 PM   #66
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I know...just ground off my bottom...could peel large sections of CSM off by hand...and put back 6oz cloth with epoxy and 8 gallons of interprotect 2000
Did you look at biaxial cloth? Or did you rotate the layers by 45 degrees?
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Old 07-05-2012, 02:14 PM   #67
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Yes, that's what I said - but I was planning on going back and editing that to say CSM below the waterline.
I thought most if not all Bayliners have chopper gun hulls?
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Old 07-05-2012, 03:59 PM   #68
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I thought most if not all Bayliners have chopper gun hulls?

Another Bayliner legend.

At one point Bayliner tried chopper gun laid up hulls. It was in the early 1980's if I remember the history correctly. I do not remember the exact models anymore, but it was a short lived experiment.
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Old 07-05-2012, 04:24 PM   #69
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I suspect it was in their smaller models. A co-worker bought a 20-something foot Bayliner Trophy hardtop in the mid-80s and within a couple of years the entire bottom was seriously blistered. To the point where the hull had to be dried out for a couple of months and then completely redone. The warranty was up but my co-worker fought Bayliner tooth and nail until they eventually agreed to pay a portion of the repair cost. That parrticular boat had a chopper gun hull.

I know there was/is quite a difference between the construction and comoponent quality of their smaller boats and their larger motoryacht types, the ones that were built in Arlington. I have always heard their bigger boats were pretty well made.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:31 PM   #70
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I suspect it was in their smaller models. A co-worker bought a 20-something foot Bayliner Trophy hardtop in the mid-80s and within a couple of years the entire bottom was seriously blistered. To the point where the hull had to be dried out for a couple of months and then completely redone. The warranty was up but my co-worker fought Bayliner tooth and nail until they eventually agreed to pay a portion of the repair cost. That parrticular boat had a chopper gun hull.

I know there was/is quite a difference between the construction and comoponent quality of their smaller boats and their larger motoryacht types, the ones that were built in Arlington. I have always heard their bigger boats were pretty well made.
I have to admit I've never had one of their ski or small fish boats. We started with the cruisers, and took them in some pretty serious places here in Alaska.

What I can say is that with the motor yacht series the quality and components seem to be approx equal to other production boats.

I've spent allot of time on some of the other popular Pacific NW built boats of the same age and the fit and finish seems on par with them.

Boats like the GB were and always will be in a separate category of fit and finish.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:56 PM   #71
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Did you look at biaxial cloth? Or did you rotate the layers by 45 degrees?
just one layer as a waterproofer...no strength really needed..even the 5'x5' patch of 3 layers 18 roving plus 6 layers of the 6 oz...biaxial stuf is nice but overkill on a 80's vintage roving and mat hull...especially with good epoxy
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Old 07-05-2012, 08:53 PM   #72
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Boats like the GB were and always will be in a separate category of fit and finish.
While GB certainly set a high standard for construction quality I think their real contribution, starting in the mid-60s, was consistency. Where many of the so-called Taiwan Trawlers varied all over the map in build quality within the same model due to the way the manufacturing and assembly was farmed out, American Marine, first in Kowloon and then in Singapore, turned out boat after boat identical in build quality. First in wood and then in fiberglass. Not just their Grand Banks line but their Alaskan line as well (which was only made in wood).

If anything sets GB apart I believe it is this consistency from boat to boat starting in 1966 up through today. Not that other makes do not exhibit the same degree of consistency. But I believe American Marine was among the first to set such high standards of consistency among production cruising boats.

What Bayliner did very, very well, perhaps better than any other boat manufacturer, was identify a market segment and then design and build a boat that met the requirements of that segment at an affordable price. This does not automatically mean corner-cutting and cheapo boats, although some of their entry-level runabouts were pretty inexpensively made.

As a result a lot of people who might not have been able to afford to get into boating, be it running about on a lake, fishing, or longer range cruising, were able to take up the pasttime. Bayliner in effect built both their boats and their market at the same time.
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Old 07-06-2012, 04:53 AM   #73
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At one point Bayliner tried chopper gun laid up hulls. It was in the early 1980's if I remember the history correctly. I do not remember the exact models anymore, but it was a short lived experiment.

"early 1980's"

After 1973 , when the resin price went up (400%+) from .19 a pound the chop chop boats became too expensive as the thickness (there for weight of resin) was too hard to control.

A chop chop boat IS the basis for LLoyds approval. The use of woven roving and CSM allows a thinner,lighter hull.

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Old 08-09-2013, 09:49 PM   #74
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Usually not good...but could be one that was done OK.....If done OK...there's so much glass on there with 120 hp diesel she's probably only displacement now.

I wouldn't probably even consider it.
Hi - I know I am following up on an older post, with at least one question that may be somewhat inappropriate - if so - simply say you prefer not to comment. My intended use is gunk holing on the Mississippi.
I have been giving some serious thought to a Foggman 32 (currently listed on yacht world), but have great difficulty finding out much about the design, the builder, and - assuming I am correct that it is the same boat - most curiously, the reason(s) she hasn't sold. It appears that over a few years, a number of folks have looked hard at her - I've also found a few requests for shipping bids, some costly - etc. Yet, at what seems a reasonable fair asking price, this boat has not moved. I KNOW, there can be thousands of reasons, but those who have looked at her and stepped away, may know things that can help others - like myself - make better decisions. So much for the uncomfortable part of the question...
I've built a few (admittedly smaller, at 16 and 26Ft) wood-epoxy boats, and in principle that part doesn't scare me much. I appreciate the concerns about CSM vs. woven matt. Much would seem to depend on how well she was dried out before they glassed her.
So, ANY info re: Foggman vessels, and any concerns specific to older boats like this 1980 model being covered later in life, shall be very much appreciated! THe 120 Lehman (1980) with reasonable hours seems pretty straightforward. A thorough testing should tell most of what needs to be known. But what about Foggman's in general? Thanks so much!
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Old 08-10-2013, 04:58 AM   #75
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I know...just ground off my bottom...could peel large sections of CSM off by hand...and put back 6oz cloth with epoxy and 8 gallons of interprotect 2000

I appreciate the concerns about CSM vs. woven matt. Much would seem to depend on how well she was dried out before they glassed her

The key here is the resin used to do the job , not CSM or cloth or roving.

Polly resin is for building new polly boats ,

EPOXY is the only choice after the boat is built.
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Old 08-10-2013, 06:21 AM   #76
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Hi - I know I am following up on an older post, with at least one question that may be somewhat inappropriate - if so - simply say you prefer not to comment. My intended use is gunk holing on the Mississippi.
I have been giving some serious thought to a Foggman 32 (currently listed on yacht world), but have great difficulty finding out much about the design, the builder, and - assuming I am correct that it is the same boat - most curiously, the reason(s) she hasn't sold. It appears that over a few years, a number of folks have looked hard at her - I've also found a few requests for shipping bids, some costly - etc. Yet, at what seems a reasonable fair asking price, this boat has not moved. I KNOW, there can be thousands of reasons, but those who have looked at her and stepped away, may know things that can help others - like myself - make better decisions. So much for the uncomfortable part of the question...
I've built a few (admittedly smaller, at 16 and 26Ft) wood-epoxy boats, and in principle that part doesn't scare me much. I appreciate the concerns about CSM vs. woven matt. Much would seem to depend on how well she was dried out before they glassed her.
So, ANY info re: Foggman vessels, and any concerns specific to older boats like this 1980 model being covered later in life, shall be very much appreciated! THe 120 Lehman (1980) with reasonable hours seems pretty straightforward. A thorough testing should tell most of what needs to be known. But what about Foggman's in general? Thanks so much!
Not sure what you are asking...don't know anything about Foggman boats...and I would personally never own a cruising wood boat

If I bought an older wooden boat that needed glass to keep her afloat, she would never leave the dock. Can it be done? Sure...just not by me and I really don't recommend it with all the glass boats out there.
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Old 08-10-2013, 12:22 PM   #77
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Foggman 32

Sorry if I was unclear. Was tiptoeing around the real question...
My interest has been seriously peaked by the Foggman 32 on Yachtworld. I have done a fair bit of digging, and came to a number of conclusions:
1. She seems at a fair asking price (Photographs are deceiving, but assuming they are as representative as they usually are).
2. Little is published about the design itself
3. Best info I found was at Tuesday Afternoon
(Tuesday Afternoon)
4. There the (then?) owner provides a link to Lowell Builders (Looks to be a high quality builder)
5. I am not scared by the fact that a cedar hull is sheathed in Epoxy (Epoxy will grip dry cedar beautifully), but when was it done, and why - appears to be a question of interest.
SO:
Why does it appear that this fairly priced, classic design, presumably built by a reputable builder has sat on the market for a LONG time, located in a densely populated area - with presumably a fair number of qualified buyers...
I must be missing something? Any ideas, comments?
(Only other thought I had was that she suffered in the hurricane, and they are trying to maintain interest using older pictures...)
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Old 08-10-2013, 02:29 PM   #78
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Jeff Fogman operated his shop in Barrington, NH starting in the mid 1970's. I did not know him but many considered him a master builder. He was a sculptor, had a master's degree in Fine Arts, built a FC ketch and cruised around for a bit, then apprenticed to well known boat builder and designer Bud McIntosh before opening his own shop. Fogman built McIntosh designs and the 32' is Bud's design. I believe the fastenings in that hull may be copper rivets (a very good thing).

You are correct to question why the fiberglass sheathing was done. It may be a bad thing, or it might be fine. A good surveyor who has experience with wooden boats will be able to give you a lot more informed information(once he has looked at the subject vessel) than a bunch of internet forum guessers.....

Reasons she's still on the market? The market for wooden boats is tiny, the market for one-off wooden (as opposed to say a GB 32) boats is smaller than tiny. The market is flooded with older production glass "lobster" yachts at very reasonable prices. Wooden boats need maintenance that most of today's boat buyers don't understand and can't be bothered to figure out. Hard stuff like painting, I have to paint my wooden boats (even though one of them is fiberglass sheathed)......
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:58 AM   #79
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That's just wrong...

Back then the hulls were stronger - the interior layouts were a masterpiece of space conservation - the engines ( mostly 6-cyl) were economical ; built to last and easy to fix - the Taiwanese wood crafting was second to none , and they were alot sexier than the plastic crap built today.

...sure they installed mild steel fuel tanks , but stainless tanks werent invented untill 1993
Yes, I have a 1978 Eurobanker sedan helm/saloon 28ft =pulpit and rear bathing platform, 80hp lehman ford engine and the fuel tank in mild steel and leaky so have to replace it ,its molded in as part of the vessel in thick ply and soundboard so will have to cut it out first and then cut out the old tank ,at 68 yrs young Im not looking forward to the job but it has to be done the fresh water tank it on the other side and when its full the vessel heals over to port by about 10/15 Degrees so not seaworthy at this time . I cannot find a brochure on the vessel or plans and no other vessel like it ,any helpful suggestions .
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:47 PM   #80
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Yes, I have a 1978 Eurobanker sedan helm/saloon 28ft =pulpit and rear bathing platform, 80hp lehman ford engine and the fuel tank in mild steel and leaky so have to replace it ,its molded in as part of the vessel in thick ply and soundboard so will have to cut it out first and then cut out the old tank ,at 68 yrs young Im not looking forward to the job but it has to be done the fresh water tank it on the other side and when its full the vessel heals over to port by about 10/15 Degrees so not seaworthy at this time . I cannot find a brochure on the vessel or plans and no other vessel like it ,any helpful suggestions .
Find a mechanically inclined, reasonably priced, willing to really work youngster (I know that is hard to find these days) to assist; you guide him/her through required processes. Let that person contort... they can take it! All tough jobs loose their intimidating factors when assistance is available... and especially after the project gets good results.

Don't forget that tanks can be crushed inward (made smaller for close quarter maneuverings) by applying ample suction (i.e. negative-inside-pressure) via one opening having sealed all other openings.
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