Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-20-2019, 11:54 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 474
Haida Gwaii 2020 plans

I'm in the early thinking and planning stages of a cruise from the Salish Sea to Haida Gwaii in 2020. I'm seeking input from those who've made the trip on the best time of year to go. Regarding both weather and crowding.

It's about 640 nm from my home port of Oak Harbor Wa on Whidbey Island via Port McNeill and Prince Rupert for fuel and provision stops. I'll call that at least a month to get there. I like to make lots of side trips off the Waggoner's path.

Some I've chatted with recommend an April departure. My experience in early season on the west coast of BC is rain. Heavy, continuous downpours. Beautiful but not anything I want to spend much time outdoors.

Thanks in advance!
__________________
Advertisement

Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2019, 12:11 PM   #2
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,760
Here's the weather averages for Queen Charlotte City:

(oops...see post below)

I've never been there by boat...I suspect crowding will not be an issue, except for maybe some of the old Haida village sites on Moresby or the west coast of Graham where you'll probably need a permit and/or attend an awareness session to visit.

The last two springs we've had brutal (for us) hot spells in April & May in the 30 degree Celsius range. Could average out next year and be wet & cold...you never know on the north coast of BC!
__________________

__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2019, 12:13 PM   #3
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,760
That copy & paste didn't work so well...here's a link to the chart: https://en.climate-data.org/north-am...#climate-table
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2019, 12:37 PM   #4
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,996
Every year is different. We went to Juneau in 03 and the sunshine and high temps were wonderful. But some people get the opposite luck. And it is luck. But now w global warming I’ll guess SE Alaska will be wetter than in the past. Everything I’ve read points that way.

But it’s a very long way to Alaska from Puget Sound. Took us 22 days on our most recent trip north. So you want to maximize your time north. As a three year event you could go north in year 1, haul out or leave the boat afloat in somebodies care, cruise all of the summer in year two and return in year three.

But in a one year plan leaving May 15th and returning a month late means two months up north lost. The commercial fishermen traditionally left Fishermen’s Warf on April 15th ... usually more or less ”en-mass”. Bur they had/have a significant advantage over most yachtsmen. They travel in groups of 5 or so boats together. They anchored up (rafted usually) and traveled in safe weather. The fishermen know a lot more about what safe weather is and isn’t than pleasureboaters. Too cautious and you could spend all of your leaving early benefit days and even more. Extremely cautious and you could need to start your return before you get there. But the safety factor is knowing when to sit tight.

You could leave in March but you’ll likely had many days at anchor. Then a boating skill that some greenhorns may be better at than seasoned skippers is the ability to sit at anchor for 2-3 days or even a week will surface. There are nice days even in March and one could be underway in Johnstone Strait or at home in Seattle.

Whatever you do learn as much as you reasonably can about what is safe and what is not. Boat maintenance, emergency planning, research ect ect.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2019, 01:16 PM   #5
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,996
Going to the Charolette’s the usual and best route is to cross Hecate Strait from Larsen Harbour en-route to Queen Charlotte City on Graham Is.

I think you need permits a year or so in advance to cruise the Haida Gwaii park in So. Moresby Is.
You can rent cars at QCC and drive the Islands Graham and North Moresby. One thing not to miss is the huge beach east of Tow Hill east of Masset. I taught shop there in Masset in 1971. Go camping in the sands east of Tow Hill if you’re able and have the gear.

For very adventurous cruisers cross through Skidigate Channel and explore the west coast. There are bays and inlets to explore. Rennell Sound, Port Louis, Port Chanal, and Tasu Sound. You could come back via Langara Is. and Masset on the north coast of Graham Is. putting in at Masset.

If you go back to Larsen Harbour or other points east via Dixon Entrance stay well away from Rose Spit. When I went by in 72 I was 5 miles north of the Spit. There is a 10’ tidal overfall just east of Rose Spit. An ebb tide and a westerly wind can make terrible seas there. Even 5 miles away on a nice day there were big lazy swirls of water.

Get “Exploring the North Coast of BC” by D & R Douglass. A $50 cruising guide.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2019, 01:39 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 29 - Express Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 492
I'm guessing you have done your homework and know that Haida Gwaii is possibly one of the most remote areas along the BC and Alaska coast. There are very few services available for cruisers.

I don't know if you have seen this video but it in the Webinar series from Slow Boat, and this video is an introduction to the Inside Passage. Jump to the 29 minute mark and Haida Gwaii is discussed for a few minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=JcAvQSdvdyg

Here is a good intro resource to let you know what to expect and how to plan your journey: https://www.nwyachting.com/2017/08/haida-gwaii/
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2019, 10:16 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 474
Thank you all for the advice and thoughts.

MurrayM, thank you for the link to wx avgs for Queen Charlotte City

Nomad Willy, Thank you for your thoughts. We aren't planning on Ak this year. We actually like the BC coast better. Being retired we do have the patience to wait out heavy weather. We're into comfort not slogging it out. Been there, done that for too many years during my career.

And great specific tip. Thank you
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Going to the Charolette’s the usual and best route is to cross Hecate Strait from Larsen Harbour en-route to Queen Charlotte City on Graham Is.

I think you need permits a year or so in advance to cruise the Haida Gwaii park in So. Moresby Is.
You can rent cars at QCC and drive the Islands Graham and North Moresby. One thing not to miss is the huge beach east of Tow Hill east of Masset. I taught shop there in Masset in 1971. Go camping in the sands east of Tow Hill if you’re able and have the gear.

For very adventurous cruisers cross through Skidigate Channel and explore the west coast. There are bays and inlets to explore. Rennell Sound, Port Louis, Port Chanal, and Tasu Sound. You could come back via Langara Is. and Masset on the north coast of Graham Is. putting in at Masset.

If you go back to Larsen Harbour or other points east via Dixon Entrance stay well away from Rose Spit. When I went by in 72 I was 5 miles north of the Spit. There is a 10’ tidal overfall just east of Rose Spit. An ebb tide and a westerly wind can make terrible seas there. Even 5 miles away on a nice day there were big lazy swirls of water.

Get “Exploring the North Coast of BC” by D & R Douglass. A $50 cruising guide.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
I'm guessing you have done your homework and know that Haida Gwaii is possibly one of the most remote areas along the BC and Alaska coast. There are very few services available for cruisers. << Yes, that is what appeals to us. The remoteness. We will be well prepared. >>

I don't know if you have seen this video but it in the Webinar series from Slow Boat, and this video is an introduction to the Inside Passage. Jump to the 29 minute mark and Haida Gwaii is discussed for a few minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=JcAvQSdvdyg

Here is a good intro resource to let you know what to expect and how to plan your journey: https://www.nwyachting.com/2017/08/haida-gwaii/
I'll check out the resources.
__________________

Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×