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Old 09-19-2012, 06:47 AM   #21
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It is nice to entertain one's self.

When Lou had shoulder surgery I would just pull along side the mooring until it was beside the cockpit. I would go back, reach down and hook it, and walk it to the bow. It was so easy that we just started doing it as a matter of practice.

When solo, I do the same with a slight addition I attach the snubber at the bow and run it aft. So I donít have to walk forward with the ball hooked.
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Old 09-19-2012, 07:33 AM   #22
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When solo, I do the same with a slight addition I attach the snubber at the bow and run it aft. So I donít have to walk forward with the ball hooked.
GREAT IDEA!

However, any places we have moored the snubber would be too long. It would secure the boat until getting up front to shorten the snubber. I will steal your suggestion.
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:26 AM   #23
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I would just pull along side the mooring until it was beside the cockpit. I would go back, reach down and hook it, and walk it to the bow. It was so easy that we just started doing it as a matter of practice.
There is a harder way? I would have thought that was the prefered method of hooking to a mooring.
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:52 AM   #24
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There is a harder way? I would have thought that was the prefered method of hooking to a mooring.
Watching people trying to grab a mooring ball can be almost comical. It is surprising that more people do not fall overboard. Mooring fields are few in the South, but increasing in number. Most cruisers are not out enough to be practiced at it. There can be a lot of shouting back and forth, and many lost boat hooks. Sitting in Hope Town Harbor watching the charter boats come in for the night is great entertainment. Many will have to pay for a boat hook when they turn the boat in.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:03 AM   #25
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Apparently a lot of the more urban areas of Florida are mandating mooring fields (guess who gets those fees?) to "save" the spotted wiggly thingy from boat anchors. Sorry. I know that over usage, bad boating habits, etc has caused a significant amount of damage to the bays and harbors. That and people deciding that "this" is a good place to drop anchor, despite the fact that it's a well traveled waterway, or whatever. As boating, at all sizes, continues to grow, and I think it will, there has to be more of that type of thing. I just hope it's only in those urban areas, where it's probably more important than in some backwaters along the entire eastern coast.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:12 AM   #26
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There is a harder way? I would have thought that was the prefered method of hooking to a mooring.
There are very few "prefered" methods in boating....captain, crew, boat, mooring ball and environment all may dictate a "paticular but not prefered" method.


Some have lines, some don't, some have hooks for bow eyes...but most don't.....etc...etc...

Only "urban" areas will profit and therefore put up the cost of a mooring field...unless it is a park/sanctuary, etc....
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Old 09-19-2012, 01:29 PM   #27
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There is a harder way? I would have thought that was the preferred method of hooking to a mooring.
A lot of boats have too much freeboard to get a line on a mooring buoy from the side or aft. This is particularly true of the motoryacht configuration aka sundeck. Also, it depends on the configuration of the buoy. Out here the common setup is to have the chain running down through the buoy center with the ring on top keeping the chain from dropping down through the buoy. So picking up the ring means you can pull the chain up through the buoy to deck level so the mooring line can be secured to the ring. So most boaters here tend to use a boathook from the bow to grab the ring.

This does not always work as advertised and depending on the tide and the buoy rigging the ring can often be very difficult to pull up, something not discovered until you try. With the chain tight and the boat drifting away from the buoy something has to give and it's usually the person's hands on the boathook. Plus it requires putting the bow next to or over the buoy which is not always as easy it would seem depending on the wind and/or current. So multiple tries and lost boathooks are common.

We secure to a buoy by taking it down the starboard side to the boarding gate where the freeboard is low and it's a simple matter to snap the large karabiner on our mooring buoy line onto the ring. The line is laid out prior to this up the side deck so once the line is clipped to the ring whoever is at the helm simply steps out on deck, picks up the line, and takes it forward to run through the starboard bow hawse, The buoy is pulled up to the bow and the line secured to the starboard deck cleat.

It takes less time to do it than describe it. We were taught this method by the checkout skipper for the GB we chartered before buying our own boat and we've been using it ever since. So far as I can recall we've never missed picking up buoy on the first try in 14 years, and we use buoys a fair amount. But it would not work on a boat with higher freeboard than ours.

There are boat-show devices that purport to make it easy to pick up a mooring buoy, hook a bull rail, etc. Some people have success with them but from our observation over the years most don't. So the boathook-from-the-bow continues to be the most widely used method up here.
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:04 PM   #28
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"We secure to a buoy by taking it down the starboard side to the boarding gate where the freeboard is low and it's a simple matter to snap the large karabiner on our mooring buoy line onto the ring. The line is laid out prior to this up the side deck so once the line is clipped to the ring whoever is at the helm simply steps out on deck, picks up the line, and takes it forward to run through the starboard bow hawse, The buoy is pulled up to the bow and the line secured to the starboard deck cleat. "


Marin are you able to reach the bouy with the carabiner in your hand or is it affixed to some sort of pole?
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:34 PM   #29
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We just reach out and clip it to the ring on the buoy.

We went with the karabiner on the mooring line when we spent a night on a mooring buoy in windy, rough water. After watching the mooring line sawing back and forth through the ring as the boat pitched and yawed we decided that it was not an ideal setup. So we had a line made with a heavy stainless thimble spliced into one end and put the karabiner on that.

Of course this prompts the question, "How do you get the karabiner off when you leave."

After having been on a buoy in some very rough conditions we decided that it would be prudent to have a backup line just in case. Since we have a dog and take him to shore at some point after our arrival we use that opportunity to put a second line through the ring and back to the boat in the "normal" manner. This serves as a backup line should the wind and waves kick up at some point. When I take the dog ashore for his last run prior to our departure I unclip the karabiner on the way back. The boat is then connected to the buoy with the backup line which we simply pull back through the ring when we depart.

This is all very easy for us since we're taking the dinghy out anyway. Might not be so convenient for people who don't have a reason to launch a dinghy when they're on a mooring buoy. But after watching that line saw back and forth through the galvanized (aka rough) ring that night we decided it was risk we were unwilling to take anymore so we came up with the plan we've been using ever since.
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Old 09-19-2012, 04:12 PM   #30
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I like your plan Marin. Necessity (and a healthy dose of fear) is the mother of all invention.

I think I'll start up a boak hook salvage operation and sell the hooks back to their owners for a fee. That, or invent a floating boat hook. Maybe that's been thought of.
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Old 09-19-2012, 06:46 PM   #31
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I like your plan Marin. Necessity (and a healthy dose of fear) is the mother of all invention.

I think I'll start up a boak hook salvage operation and sell the hooks back to their owners for a fee. That, or invent a floating boat hook. Maybe that's been thought of.

Many boat hooks DO float because they are wood....that's all we use on our assistance towing boats..12 feet of oak

Actually floating boat hooks were all the rage till boating became popular and someone thought a telescoping boat hook (extraordinarily dangerous sometimes) would be cool...
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Old 09-19-2012, 07:58 PM   #32
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Wooden floating boat hook.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:11 PM   #33
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Swimming noodles make good boat hook floats and protects the surface they may come in contact with.


I do have a question on mooring.How does one determine the rode scope between the ball and boat?I've seen some boats right on the ball and some nearly 100 feet away.Most of the boats I see like this are in the 30-40 foot range.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:43 PM   #34
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Swimming noodles make good boat hook floats and protects the surface they may come in contact with.


I do have a question on mooring.How does one determine the rode scope between the ball and boat?I've seen some boats right on the ball and some nearly 100 feet away.Most of the boats I see like this are in the 30-40 foot range.
Unless you think you are gonna pull the mooring ball under...it doesn't matter...
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:44 PM   #35
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Unless you think you are gonna pull the mooring ball under...it doesn't matter...
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:53 PM   #36
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In a mooring field if you have too much scope you will swing too much. The mooring ball connection with the anchor has slack. Usually a short connection from the boat to the mooring ball is all you need.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:59 PM   #37
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In a mooring field if you have too much scope you will swing too much. The mooring ball connection with the anchor has slack. Usually a short connection from the boat to the mooring ball is all you need.

That was my line of thinking but I was unsure.Why is it that some people insist on a long scope from the ball in Charleston Harbor?Well,maybe not exactly there but close by.
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Old 09-19-2012, 10:01 PM   #38
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I do have a question on mooring.How does one determine the rode scope between the ball and boat?I've seen some boats right on the ball and some nearly 100 feet away.Most of the boats I see like this are in the 30-40 foot range.
We pull the mooring ball up pretty close under the bow. Not so close that it bangs against the bow all the time. But probably about four or five feet away from it if the wind or current is holding us off of it.
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Old 09-20-2012, 02:50 AM   #39
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Someone in Australia has invented a magnetic mooring system. An electromagnet on the bow gets attracted to a specially designed mooring buoy. With the boat magnetically held, you attach the line at leisure. Website is | MagnaMoor. Obviously it is for your private mooring,not public ones like, Angel Island etc.
It is designed for boats 8-20 meters.Presumably potential issues with metal objects on the bow (anchor,chain,windlass) have been resolved. BruceK
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Old 09-20-2012, 02:53 AM   #40
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That`s not the web address I typed. I don`t see the point in redoing it,it will likely get corrupted again. BruceK
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