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Old 11-06-2018, 08:50 AM   #41
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Good thread. Let’s it keep it that way.

DaveO, SD is more security sensitive. it’s proximity to the Border being the primary reason. Regarding slips, agree, they are expensive, but about average for SoCal. If you want expensive, try Newport. 2 to 3 X. Mooring Balls: there are three areas, and one is for traveling cruisers which I believe you are referring to. Some of the travelers, and locals who have permanent balls, have pumped their black tanks overboard. It’s a problem. This is also a place where boats go to die, so they are trying to get ahead of that problem. Not saying you are any of the above, just explaining why the added security and precautions are taken.
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Old 11-06-2018, 11:32 AM   #42
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Ah the border, I honestly hadn’t even considered that, thought it was related to the military presence. While whining about the high cost I should have added that, compared to the PNW, the beautiful weather in San Diego is worth every penny! Again, just imo.
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Old 11-06-2018, 11:48 AM   #43
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To be honest I just do not see it as a problem in my boat, and I do not see it as a problem for any Coastal Cruiser.

As Woodsea posted, itís not a long jpurney, itís a series of day trips. If you are retired there is no schedule. You wait in port for a optimum weather window and you move to the next port.

I don't disagree with you about it being possible with any coastal cruiser, and there are a number of TF members that do it. I do think there are a lot of differences among coastal cruisers, speed being the principle one. I could make the trip in my boat but I would need larger weather windows than you would in your boat. As such, I could be stuck waiting in port much longer than you would be.


I didn't bring my prior sailboat up the coast from SoCal simply because I had to work. If I had been retired, I would have brought it up on its own bottom.
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Old 11-06-2018, 12:11 PM   #44
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We have a Mainship 390, 300 Gallons of fuel, 8 knots 3 gallons per hour, based on this past year. like any Coastal Trawler they all hate the beam and aft quarter in a sea. we were sailors for 40 years our last boat a Bayfield 36, we hated beating and loved off the wind, the total opposite on the Trawler, loves going into the sea. we love the boat and are just care full when we go, 20knots on the beam in open water is the most we will go out in, we steer from down below in these conditions, the boat will take a lot more than you. In protected waters with no sea, we have been out in 30knots plus, having a great time, putting her back on the dock on the other hand was indeed a challenge that day. good luck
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Old 11-06-2018, 12:15 PM   #45
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I've been seeing pictures of the pacific coast all of my life. This thread made me realize that pictures of the pacific coast, rocks, cliffs, birds, crashing waves, were not taken from a boat.


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Old 11-06-2018, 02:51 PM   #46
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OK, has anybody spent any time at the marinas in Ensenada? IE Hotel Coral, or Cruiseport?
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:25 PM   #47
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OK, has anybody spent any time at the marinas in Ensenada? IE Hotel Coral, or Cruiseport?
Spent 5 months at Marina Coral in Ensenada about 15 years ago while getting ready to go south. Enjoyed the stay although it was a little far from downtown but there was a bus stop nearby as well a decent taxi service and you have full use of the hotel facilities. Downtown Ensenada has some nice restaurants, shops, supermarkets, and a great fish market (including some great fish street tacos). Cruiseport is downtown but I understand that they do not have a fuel dock.
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:33 PM   #48
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Spent 5 months at Marina Coral in Ensenada about 15 years ago while getting ready to go south. Enjoyed the stay although it was a little far from downtown but there was a bus stop nearby as well a decent taxi service and you have full use of the hotel facilities. Downtown Ensenada has some nice restaurants, shops, supermarkets, and a great fish market (including some great fish street tacos). Cruiseport is downtown but I understand that they do not have a fuel dock.
Thanks! Ensenada s one of the places I would like to see.
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:47 PM   #49
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A Mainship is not suitable for offshore cruising. They are fine Delta or ICW boats but without a keel and tiny rudders they track like a drunken sailor and are dangerous in a following sea.
Definitely would look at other options.
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:48 PM   #50
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Thanks for all the thoughtful replies. Iím going to go over them with the ďOwnerĒ aka my wife.

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Old 11-06-2018, 05:51 PM   #51
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OK, has anybody spent any time at the marinas in Ensenada? IE Hotel Coral, or Cruiseport?
We spent a month at Hotel Coral and loved it. A great Ex-Pat group on the dock and first class marina.
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Old 11-06-2018, 10:01 PM   #52
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OK, has anybody spent any time at the marinas in Ensenada? IE Hotel Coral, or Cruiseport?

I have spent a fair amount of time in both marinas in Ensenada, both have their strong points. Coral is really nice but can suffer from surge. I spent a few nights there on the last Delivery and the staff and the restaurant is first rate. The head of security is a retired Seattle sheriff and loves the area. Great restaurants in town.

Definitely WAY less expensive than S.D .. but S.D is just about perfect..

HOLLYWOOD
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Old 11-07-2018, 01:07 AM   #53
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A former owner of my current boat made the Canada to Mexico every year. With a big boat the trip isn't that tough. This boat is 83' with 6' of freeboard. Going north in anything other a storm is doable, but may be uncomfortable. I've done it in Small Craft and Gale warnings.
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:38 AM   #54
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A Mainship is not suitable for offshore cruising. They are fine Delta or ICW boats but without a keel and tiny rudders they track like a drunken sailor and are dangerous in a following sea.
Definitely would look at other options.


I, and a whole lot of Mainship drivers would disagree with your opinion. Mine has over 3,000 hours on her motors - a significant portion of those done offshore and doing the exact type of coastal cruising the OP was asking about. Its fairly common for many SD boats to yaw in a quartering/following sea, especially at slower speeds. The M390 is hardly alone in that, nor would I consider your blanket statement that she is dangerous in a following sea to be valid. The nice thing is my ability to advance the throttles and match or exceed the swell movement. The OP did not ask if the M390 is a blue water boat. This discussion has centered around coastal cruising, with some wise caveats given regarding weather windows, river bar crossing and other great west coast specific advice. As someone who actually owns and uses their M390 offshore, I can attest first hand that she does quite well as a coastal cruiser.
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Old 11-08-2018, 11:21 AM   #55
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I, and a whole lot of Mainship drivers would disagree with your opinion. Mine has over 3,000 hours on her motors - a significant portion of those done offshore and doing the exact type of coastal cruising the OP was asking about. Its fairly common for many SD boats to yaw in a quartering/following sea, especially at slower speeds. The M390 is hardly alone in that, nor would I consider your blanket statement that she is dangerous in a following sea to be valid. The nice thing is my ability to advance the throttles and match or exceed the swell movement. The OP did not ask if the M390 is a blue water boat. This discussion has centered around coastal cruising, with some wise caveats given regarding weather windows, river bar crossing and other great west coast specific advice. As someone who actually owns and uses their M390 offshore, I can attest first hand that she does quite well as a coastal cruiser.
Might depend a bit on the coast, and the weather....
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Old 11-08-2018, 11:31 AM   #56
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^^ +1. There are places and weather on the west coast where 5 miles offshore is as bad or worse than 400 miles offshore. You can pick your weather windows but it's a bit like roulette - do it enough and you'll land on the loaded cylinder one day.
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Old 11-08-2018, 12:34 PM   #57
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I'm somewhat reluctant to sound off on this thread, as it's a bit open-ended for my taste. But here goes!

Given the dearth of cruising literature extolling the the coastline between the northern tip of Washington State and mid-California, it should be apparent that this stretch of water is NOT a "cruising destination". In addition, a casual glance of pictures of ports of call between these locations will reveal a significant lack of pleasure boats. Both should be a clue that the notion of making a voyage in either direction along this stretch of water might be better thought of as a delivery, vs a cruise. While this is a bit of a generalization, the notion that a retiree, with no schedule, can and will be safe and comfortable on this part of the ocean, given sufficient patience and a well-found vessel, and can thus routinely venture upon these waters with impunity is naive and disingenuous. And why is that?

Well, EVERYONE has a schedule! If you've ever been stuck in Neah Bay (for instance) for a week awaiting a weather window to go southbound, when the big event for the week is a Wednesday night high school basketball game, you've visited the Cultural Center several times already, you've read every book aboard multiple times, and even the local Coasties and rescue tug crews are bored out of their gourds will convince you that the sooner you can get off this stretch of water, the better.

If you've ever had to lay over in Coos Bay on the transient dock that the locals love to crab from, leaving their beer cans and crab guts behind, and a LOOOOnnng way from anything like a town with something to entertain yourself with while waiting for some event like the prevailing howling northwesterly in the summer to lay down will provide reinforcement of that notion. If you've ever had to hike from the transient docks at Bodega Bay (again, waiting for a weather window to get around Cape Mendocino) for a dinner on the town (something like 3 miles R/T) will reinforce that notion.

I have made passages from SoCal to the PNW multiple times, aboard typical "coastal cruising powerboats", at many different times of year. I've made these trips as both multiple day-trips, and long-distance 24/7 deliveries. And they've NEVER been other than as DDW expressed it so well-a game of russian roulette. Sometimes you're the window, and sometimes you're the bug, and I've landed on the loaded cylinder several times, often multiple times during a trip. And conversely, I've had trips where there was seldom even water on the windshield. You pays your money, and you takes your chances.

Planning for a routine "north in the summer, south in the winter" snowbird gig on a pleasure boat along this coastline is certainly not for me. YMMV, and anyone is certainly welcome to have at it. But talk to the professionals that run this coastline (Pat Raines comes to mind), and heed their advice. Life's too short to practice bleeding before cruising, and I've done my share of bleeding along this particular stretch of coastline.

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Old 11-08-2018, 12:36 PM   #58
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^^ +1. There are places and weather on the west coast where 5 miles offshore is as bad or worse than 400 miles offshore. You can pick your weather windows but it's a bit like roulette - do it enough and you'll land on the loaded cylinder one day.
Another problem with the West coast is the fact that ports of refuge if the weather turns snotty can be closed due to bar conditions. Last time we went down the first available port was Coos Bay Oregon after rounding cape Flattery. Bit of a haul.
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