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Old 06-14-2014, 09:07 PM   #81
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US is more scared of Canada items than Canada is of US it seems.
One other thing to keep in mind if you have a crew so inclined - that now legal in Washington State marijuana is still verboten when going North. Not accusing anyone, just sayin' 😉
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Old 06-14-2014, 09:28 PM   #82
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One other thing to keep in mind if you have a crew so inclined - that now legal in Washington State marijuana is still verboten when going North. Not accusing anyone, just sayin' 😉
All my crew and guests know no drugs on the boat ever, period. In fact, they've all signed that they know that.

I don't know but I was thinking no one was actually licensed yet to sell it in WA, although already have medical. Canada has medical too, don't they? I figure about the time the stores get set up in Colorado and WA, the feds will decide to step in and enforce like they did in California on medical. Of course 50% of the population in LA was prescribed medical. Although maybe 50% really do need it. A lot of stress in LA.

Wifey B: How many years now in our war on drugs? I mean just go to any college campus and get all you want. And really, marijuana is sooooooooooo overrated. I swear it's like the old song from Fantastiks, "Why do kids put beans in their ears." Because you say no. We saw so many laid back people in WA, I don't know if that was their norm or they were stoned. hehe. And I mean that nicely that they weren't as stressed and frantic as some. I mean like go to NYC and you'd swear they were all on speed or something.

Hubby B: But you make a good point for Washingtonians in the future. They might get in the habit, have it in their purses, not think about it.
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Old 06-14-2014, 11:25 PM   #83
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One other thing to keep in mind if you have a crew so inclined - that now legal in Washington State marijuana is still verboten when going North. Not accusing anyone, just sayin' ��
Pot is legal to possess in Alaska, its been that way since 1976

But...

The USCG is empowered to enforce federal laws. so..

No pot on my boat. Besides I have spent a career in safety sensitive jobs (random drug testing) so I couldnt indulge even if I was so inclined.
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Old 07-02-2014, 08:32 AM   #84
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T-minus 24 hours and I'm off!


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Old 07-02-2014, 11:46 AM   #85
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If you make it to Seward, please look me up. I keep cold beer on board and would enjoy sharing a cold one.
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Old 07-02-2014, 04:41 PM   #86
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Have fun. A good friend of mine has made it to Juneau and is on his way back. Tracking him on his Spot and he is just south of Prince Rupert and entering "The Trench."
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Old 07-19-2014, 03:28 PM   #87
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Just returned from our Alaska trip

Sorry we weren't able to meet any of our TF friends while there but as we typically had 10 or 11 on our boat and lots of plans as a group it was the one pleasure we just had to forego. We actually had a total of 14 people with some flying in or out. Plus our schedule, as one would expect, changed often. However, we do want to share some of the things we saw and the highlights and our tribute to the beauty of Alaska.

As a prelude, we're warm weather people, live in Fort Lauderdale. Had never boated in the PNW even until May, had never even been to Washington state until last winter (yes did get snowfall on our first trip to Seattle). So in many ways Alaska is about as far opposite to our norm as one can get. Same was true of our guests. Other than our Alaskan pilot we used, all of us currently live in Fort Lauderdale. Only one of us had ever lived north of North Carolina.

So we experienced a world so new to us. Dolphins beside our boat we're use to. Whales around us not. Sea otters, sea lions, walruses, harbor seals, dall porpoises, all wonderful to experience. The wildlife was equally stunning. Most of it we had seen variations before but perhaps not the specific breed. Some we'd only seen in zoos. We're not bird watchers or experts but even those that looked similar to ones we were familiar with always seemed a bit larger. They say everything is bigger in Texas but we found that to be more true of Alaska.

This was the first time any of us had ever seen glaciers. We were certainly in awe of the first ones we saw, but still in awe of others. They didn't get old as each was a bit different. Some we saw from our boat, some from our tenders, some by float planes, and some from tours on other's boats that took us deeper and closer in some areas.

Total trip from leaving Vancouver to landing again in Port Angeles was 38 days. We covered 3650 nm in our boat, 280 engine hours. Also another 18 hours or so on other boats, 6 on a float plane, and 18 in each of our tenders as we always took both out. We docked in 11 towns, also spent time in Glacier Bay and anchored five nights. Our Captains also took advantage of the fishing opportunities and went our 5 times while we did other things.

We love viewing the beauty, seeing museums and learning the history, and finding local art (and buying way too much of it but we only keep a little and the rest goes to a store we have so South Floridians get to share the beauty we find on our trips). Mainly we love to show love to the local artists and encourage them to continue in their craft of beauty.

Now we're not swayed to want to move to Alaska. While lots of hours of sunlight is nice, don't think we'd do well with the opposite and we have missed warm weather. But certainly we gained an understanding of what those of you who live there see. We also will say that people were extremely friendly wherever we went. Don't yet have words to describe the uniqueness of the Alaskan people but there is something special there.

Now while the sea life, wildlife, and natural beauty were the highlights of the trip, a few of the wonderful things we saw or places we visited.

Ketchikan

The Totem Heritage Center is beautiful. We were a bit envious of those who get to take their Native Arts Classes although I have no artistic skill personally. For the first time in our lives we gained an understanding of totem poles. Not just some poles with drawings but the culture and the history. We're glad they are being preserved. While the Tongass Historical Museum is small it is beautiful. We found the story of the first people and the history of Ketchikan as depicted there to be fascinating. We did find a few hand crafted pieces at a local gallery that we could treasure as remembrances of our trip and share with others. We loved just walking Creek Street in Ketchikan. Such retained beauty. We fell victim to Norman Jackson's and ended up with a carving. At Alaska Eagle Arts my wife couldn't resist a couple of pendants and somehow we ended up with four serigraphs, Summer Journey, Family Reunion, Journey's End and Golden Messenger. and we loved our stroll through Sam McGee's Warehouse. We did stop at the Southeast Alaska Discovery Center and we had dinner at Annabelle's Keg and Chowder House one night. One advantage of a large traveling party is sampling of many different foods. We enjoyed their Prime Rib, Filet Mignon, Halibut, Cod, Salmon, Prawns and Scallops but the highlight was clearly their King Crab. We even took a huge take out order of it to the boat the next night and had a feast. We didn't sample desserts as we'd just have another bite of seafood instead. Lot's of sharing and sampling.

Then the Float Plane to Misty Fjords. You see the spirit of the Doyon's family business. What a way to experience our first Fjords. This was just a beautiful peek into what was to come as we moved further north. As much as we love seeing things by water the air view sure gives a beautiful perspective.

Wrangell

We started our exploring with the Wrangell Museum which gave us a good introduction plus tempted us with hand made items in the gift shop. But the Anan Bear and Wildlife Observatory was the highlight of our time there. Just seeing the bears in that habitat was incredible. Then we visited the Petroglyph beach. To see the preserved carvings in the rocks was amazing. We're use to just sand on our beaches.

Petersburg

We spent a full day exploring Petersburg area by tender. Up Petersburg Creek, down the narrows, just taking in the beauty of the Tongass National Forest from a very close water view. We had to refuel both tenders a couple of times during the day. Had a blast. Very pleasant day doing a lot of nothing but just absorbing the feel of where we were.

Juneau

We were disappointed that the Alaska State Museum is closed and I'm sure it will be great when it reopens. The Arts and Culture center was nice and saw some very nice local work. The Juneau Douglas City Museum was extremely interesting in exposing us to history we had no idea of from the Japanese resettlement to their history of mining, gold, hydropower, seeing what an Assay Lab looks like and much more. We loved the Last Chance Mining Museum. To us before the trip the Gold Rush was just a term but this made it a bit more real and alive. We visited the Macauley Salmon Hatchery as well. Just the magnitude of the amount of salmon they hatch astonished us and seeing it in person. Can't say a hatchery was tops on our must see list but glad we took the time to see it. We also saw St. Nicholas Church. Beautiful and very interesting history.

The highlight was still Tracy Arm Fjord and Sawyer Glacier. The emerald green water was beautiful. The bears, goats, seals, eagles, other big birds whose names I don't remember, and of course the whales that seemed to be everywhere we went. The mile high rocks. Beautiful sight.

As an aside the only disappointment in Alaska was we were a bit surprised by the water and it being rather polluted and dirty. Looking up at the water coming over the falls made us think of that more vividly. I guess somehow we had the misconception of the beautiful wilderness less disturbed and more pure. Having the risks of fish unsafe to eat or other impact is a bit scary. I just hope things are kept from worsening and turned around a bit for the sake of all the people there.

Glacier Park

Well, we anchored near, checked in at Bartlett Cove when they opened and thoroughly enjoyed the long day, then anchored not too far outside to resume our trip the next day. We felt so privileged to be able to share such beauty. It was such an awakening day. Our eyes were wide open all day. It might have been a bit cool but we spent the day on the decks just absorbing it all. We even brought our food outside to eat. It was as if we were all afraid we'd miss something. All day using the bridge helm. No way to truly describe how blessed we felt on that day with the chance to see it and all in our lives. To share it with such close friends. Maybe the most wide eyed was our friend's mother who flew in from Spain to join us. She's traveled the world, on yachts from 200-400' with the wealthiest of families, and the experience of Glacier Bay with her daughter and us was part of one of the most wonderful experiences of her life.

Skagway

You're afraid after Glacier Bay that everything will be anti-climatic but Skagway quickly got our juices flowing again. It started with the Klondike Gold Rush History Museum. Now we got an in depth look at it in an area it was huge. Of course we also loved the Red Onion Saloon Brothel Museum. It was such a fun escape and we'd never seen a brothel before. Some of the stories were so interesting whether true or not. We however didn't see the ghost, Lydia. We also went on a walking tour with one of the madams of the streets and back alleys. We enjoyed walking State Street and Broadway Street. Skagway had so much to see. We were able to pick up some native art. The carvings from Walrus bones are unbelievable as were the ivory carvings. We went a bit wild at Lynch and Kennedy. Fortunately we did get some discounts as dealers.

We enjoy the Trail of '98 Museum and even more the Days of '98 Show. This show is in its 91st Season. Soapy Smith is a con man. It is Vaudeville done Gold Rush style. It was hilarious and so entertaining. The Skagway Museum was enjoyable as well as was Corrington's Museum of Alaskan History. Of course, Corrington's also had to have a gift shop. Skagway was so much more than we expected. Time seemed too short. We did check out the Chilkoot Dining Room in the local hotel and it was excellent.

Haines

Haines was a very short stop but not without pleasure. The American Bald Eagle Foundation Museum was a great tour. The Bald Eagle was a symbol and a two dimensional drawing to us before the trip. Yes, occasionally a mass marketed statue of some sort. But this brought the eagle and it's habitat alive for us. The Kroschel Wildlife Museum was enthralling. This is a Kroschel Films project and there is a movie, "The Grounded" with a sequel about to premiere. From the wolf pups to the grizzly bears to the wolverines, all a great experience. Just a reminder too of how much beauty and excitement you can find everywhere you go. We've never visited any port that we didn't find something special. Last but not least was the Sheldon Museum and Cultural Center. We enjoyed the Tlingit Cultural Displays and all the pioneer history displays along with the display of Fort Seward.

Valdez

Gulf of Mexico and Prince William Sound and then you find Valdez. We did have to explore the narrows by tender a few hours. The highlight was probably a cruise with Chugach Coastal Cruisers and the Columbia Glacier. We were educated on all the different types of whales although I must admit I've forgotten most of what I was taught but saw so many beautiful creatures. This glacier was so active and you just could see the tons of ice that flows down.

We went to our second hatchery, The Solomon Gulch Hatchery. We did get some smoked salmon to take back to the boat and actually found out we had two among us who like caviar so got some of it too. Personally, I don't see how or why anyone eats it. The Maxine and Jessy Whitney Museum is unique in that it's just basically the collections of the Whitneys. We found what they had picked up in their travels fascinating. Guess we're a bit like them in a way. We don't think of ourselves as collectors. But we do like to pick up things at various places we visit, especially if there is a story behind them. Something we can remember. It's like Apalachicola. We didn't think much about visiting there. But we did and met the artists in their studios. Heard why they created various works of art, what it meant to them. We also love that we're able to share some of these items with others. We visited the Valdez Museum on Egan and the one on Hazelet. While we think of history as old, we learned more of the Great Alaskan Earthquake and Tsunamis of 1964. Still before our time and we knew nothing about it before. The model and artifacts of Old Town, the exhibits on glaciers and mining were nice. Then the Alaska Native Gallery exhibit was intriguing. Learning different cultures always is to us.

Funny, you mention museums and many are immediately disinterested. But even the two 18 year olds on board (ok, they both turned 19 during the trip) found many of these museums fascinating. We did sample THC Off the Hook Bar and Grill.

Seward

The Alaska Sealife Center was a highlight. More than the exhibits was the work being done in research, rehabilitation and education. Conservation science is something we find most interesting. We visited the Seward Museum and the Chugach Heritage Center as well. Great local seafood at Chinooks.

From Seward we spent some time exploring Resurrection bay, then Aialak Bay, Harris Bay, Nuka Bay, and even Hook Inlet around to Kachermak Bay, anchoring for a night on our way to our next destination, Kodiak.

Kodiak

I'm always reminded by the many cruisers whose books I've read how much there is to see. One part I love is that they talk about visiting the most beautiful place, only to be followed by the next most beautiful. The best place truly is where you are at the moment. Both Fort Abercrombie and Shuyak Island State Park were beautiful. We loved the Kodiak Laboratory Aquarium and Touch Tank. In addition to crabs, seastars, and various fish it is a museum with many other invertebrates, a large number of which I'd never heard. We had a lot of tender fun around Kodiak exploring the harbor, nearby bays, and a couple of islands nearby.

There were two noteworthy museums. First was Alutiig Museum. Exploring the history and culture of the Alutiig people was very enjoyable for us. The Artists Gallery was the real winner to us though with the works of over 20 native artists. From weaving to skin sewing to boat building to jewelry to carvings, it was all outstanding. I guess it goes without saying we got very carried away in the museum store. But there is something so wonderful about seeing local artists work, it's uniqueness and beauty and letting them know how much we appreciate it, not just by complimenting but by buying it. Is art necessary? I don't know and won't debate it. But it sure does give pleasure and even more it often tells stories. I'm not so interested in some piece hanging in the Louvre as in what the local artist creates and knowing what they put into it. There were many great pieces of jewelry that were "must have's" for my wife and our friends. The Baranov Museum was also beautiful. It really brought home the closeness and ties between Russia and this area of Alaska. Seal skin currency printed in Russia in the early 1800's and a metal bust of Tsar Alexander brought to Alaska in 1804. For those seeking a kayak they had a 26' one on display, built in wood and covered with sea lion skin, built in the 1800's. A reminder too of geographically close countries growing apart as Russia and Alaska were pulled apart by politics and government. Living in South Florida, our example of that is of course Cuba. People forget the closeness that once existed. I'm always a bit skeptical when any restaurant puts "Great" in it's name but we did have a great meal at Henry's Great Alaskan Restaurant.

Sitka

Our trip from Kodiak to Sitka was actually in pretty tame conditions or at least we considered them relatively mild for the area. Now many here might think quite the opposite. Regardless, they were better than average. We enjoyed Sitka National Historic Park, including especially the Russian Bishop's House. A stroll in the rainforest was nice. Yes, after a few weeks in the PNW and Alaska a bit of rain hardly matters anymore. You always go prepared. There was a wonderful short video shown too tying the history of Sitka together.

The Alaska Raptor Center has 24 raptors on display. The Sheldon Jackson museum was great for having native artists demonstrations and displays. More skin covered boats and dugout canoes. Several different cultures explored. The Sitka Historical Museum was excellent and there was one staff person who was so energetic and excited to tell you about the artifacts and history of individuals we could have listened endlessly to her. We had to go to the Fortress of the Bear, a bear rescue center. Were able to get safely close to the bears. The Sitka Sound Science Center was another great visit. We enjoyed the aquarium and hatchery but also seeing the research they are doing there. If you hear a restaurant named Ludvig's Bistro do you have any idea what to expect. Well, they say "Rustic Mediterranean Fare." I'm not sure yet I know what that means. Their main courses included duck, lamb chops, rockfish, linguini, steak, paella, halibut, shrimp, and scallops. It was quite good but the name and description still throws me a bit.

Back to the lower 48

Now the trip outside from Sitka back to Washington wasn't always the most pleasant. Had it worsened we would have returned inland but we wanted to make the circle. 8' much of the way but certainly tolerable. Funny though that everyone warned about the Gulf of Alaska and it was much calmer than this. We hit the lower 48 after an incredible experience. We thank all of Alaska. Wish we could have visited with all you who live there. It's also a reminder of wherever you are how much beauty is near. Each port is different but each has a lot to offer. I know ours was more museum and history oriented than many would enjoy. However, we saw a lot of the outdoors. We remain so thankful for the experience. Now a day of relaxing before the excitement of Victoria and Vancouver, a much different world than the one we've just left.
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Old 07-19-2014, 09:06 PM   #88
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Congratulations on a well executed trip. You planned it well and saw some wonderful things. Rather than asking TF members for advice, you should be giving it. Again, well done.
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Old 07-19-2014, 09:58 PM   #89
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Congratulations on a well executed trip. You planned it well and saw some wonderful things. Rather than asking TF members for advice, you should be giving it. Again, well done.
No. Can always use more advice. Certainly many here who knew Alaska and we'd never been there. Same reason we had a local Pilot/Captain accompany and advise us. He was invaluable in knowing what he did. 95% of the time he made no difference but other times his advice, his contacts, made things better. Looking for an anchorage near Glacier Bay and Active Captain has them but locals know which ones are likely to be full and which aren't. Knowing the best way to see Glacier Bay, a good plan of cruising inside for the day. Other places his relationships with dockmasters or fuel companies. And on the long crossings such as Kodiak to Sitka and Sitka to Port Angeles it was nice to have a lot of licensed captains aboard to take the helm, to navigate, to watch. None of us ever got tired or felt short of rest.

As to places to see, Trip Advisor was a great resource as were local tourist or city web sites. We may never get back to Alaska or, if we do, it may be years or decades, so we tried to fully enjoy it. It's a world removed from anyplace we'd ever been on land or water. We had a couple more stop and go places, especially two in Canada on our way to Ketchikan. But didn't see much, just stopped around 10 pm and left by 5 am.

Most would not make the trip as we did. But mainly we just wanted to point out all the great places we found to explore and enjoy. Every place you cruise is special in it's own way. We also love to learn new things, history and culture, see the art of locales and people. When you live 4,000 miles away it's amazing how little you know about an area. By water it's almost 6,000 nm. Not like we're going to get home and then decide to make a weekend cruise here. People everywhere were so nice and helpful. Fortunately our guests who flew in had no real problems getting to us. Long flights but things went well. We also loved our mixture of eating as we normally do on board and trying the specialties of the house in the restaurants we tried. Generally we sampled one in each town. Sometimes lunch or snacks in others. What we should have done is carried a pedometer. No telling how many miles we walked. And we even found the chance to play basketball and tennis for exercise twice during the trip. Both times basketball in a high school gym and tennis on the local court (and I do mean that singular). People thought it hilarious that we wanted either but were always happy to help those crazy people. What's better than a pick up game of basketball with local high school boys who have no idea before hand what a shooter my wife is.

Admittedly we weren't in a Trawler, but we were definitely trawlering (even if at a greater speed than most) and seeing and experiencing as trawler owners do. Oh and got to know some great Ferry captains too. Followed a couple for hours along the way but only after asking if they minded. Amazing how they clear the way. Saw very few pleasure boats most of the time. Our Captain did manage to find people in many places to go fishing with and enjoyed that. Oh and we added enough sea time to upgrade both of our licenses.

Memories we can keep forever.
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Old 07-19-2014, 10:49 PM   #90
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Thank you very much for that write up! Even though I've been up the Inside Passage and even lived in Juneau for a couple of years, I haven't made it (yet!) to all those places.
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Old 07-19-2014, 11:04 PM   #91
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Well, I'm glad you had a good time in Alaska!

The invitation is always open to stop by if you get back this way!
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Old 07-19-2014, 11:56 PM   #92
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Well, I'm glad you had a good time in Alaska!

The invitation is always open to stop by if you get back this way!
We hoped to see you and Al and some others and had it just been the two of us definitely would have. It was definitely a trip outside our norm. Sure got a much different understanding of Alaska. Seeing and experiencing is far different from reading and studying. I would say this too that like most things media sure doesn't present it very accurately. Shows like "Buying Alaska". Well, the majority of Alaskans don't live as some of those people seek to. You'd think it was really a primitive society. Never see a Safeway on that show. Even as you read stories of those who have been there, often they're just spectacular while most people lead far more normal day to day lives. Just the normal is different based on climate and surroundings. Interesting too to talk to people there and get their perception of Fort Lauderdale. They think we're all naked on the beach, partying all the time and having orgies. Oh, maybe that's right. lol. Just kidding but my experience over the years has been people are a lot alike wherever you go, just different habits and mannerisms and adapt to different conditions.

17-19 hours of light is sure different at first. You don't want to miss any of it. But you realize you must. I would think winters would be pretty horrible for those moving there with Seasonal Affective Disorder high. But I'm sure you learn to cope. At the start of our trip we didn't spend much time on the bridge when it was under 70 degrees. By the end we were all up top on some days of 60 degrees when the water conditions weren't too rough. Yes, in South Florida, people put on jackets below 70 degrees. lol. We laughed when we moved there but a few months later realized we were doing it too.

Honestly, when we first started making lists of places we most wanted to cruise, Alaska wasn't on it. But once we realized we'd be picking up a boat in Washington, it seemed stupid to not take advantage of the opportunity and we've very glad we did. As we got closer to the trip, we got more excited and we enjoyed it thoroughly. Now when we fly home for a bit at the end of the month we will also enjoy higher speed, warmer weather and all the insanity of South Florida.
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Old 07-20-2014, 12:00 AM   #93
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Thank you very much for that write up! Even though I've been up the Inside Passage and even lived in Juneau for a couple of years, I haven't made it (yet!) to all those places.
We found people only talking inside passage and Southern Alaska when we started talking about it. We regretted we weren't going further than we did. But still we're glad we saw more. But for those with less time or speed than could spend months on the inside passage and southern area. For instance, we didn't explore BC at all and won't except for Victoria and Vancouver. Never made it to Bellingham with a change of plans. But then one thing we do is always leave enough to make us want to return. Never try to cover it all in one trip.
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Old 07-21-2014, 02:02 PM   #94
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They say everything is bigger in Texas but we found that to be more true of Alaska.

Well yes!!!! If Alaska was split in two, Texas would become the third largest state in the union! Glad you enjoyed your trip!

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Old 02-15-2015, 08:18 PM   #95
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Long time needed update.

The trip was a success and learned a ton, especially being a big novice captain. We took 9 days to get up to Ketchikan. We saw some impressive stuff but did not spend enough time exploring. More of a speed date trip. Not sure if I would spend more time or power through and make it in less days. Seems everything to see (wildlife) was in SE Alaska rather than Canada. We left Ketchikan and headed for the prince of whales islands. Almost got tired of seeing whales, they were so plentiful. Figured we caught over 1k lbs of packaged fish (filled two chest geezers), tested the boat with some rough water (cracked a mirror in the bathroom. Lots of puckered nights on the hook, in questionable anchorages when we were running out of daylight. Did I mention it gets really dark there with no moon? Only problem on the trip was a failed water pump. Which I had a spare. Even had the pleasure of docking at the fuel dock and moorage in 40-45 knot winds.. Direct to the port...it was my toughest challenge to date, and made it out with out a scratch. I came back with some changes (reduce amperage usage, improve nobeltec computer, improve salt eater wash down GPM number) and already planning different trip next year. Family is excited for it (did I mention I took 5 kids and 7 adults on the trip up?) but has expectations of a trip with more wildlife (they were dropped off in Ketchikan) so we will leave boat there for a while and fly up over a few months. Then bring boat back.

I'll be posting about amperage usage improvements, Mac mini as new nobeltec computer and other improvements as I get more time. Thanks for all the advice, it helped a lot.


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Old 02-15-2015, 10:19 PM   #96
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. Family is excited for it (did I mention I took 5 kids and 7 adults on the trip up?) but has expectations of a trip with more wildlife (they were dropped off in Ketchikan) so we will leave boat there for a while and fly up over a few months.
Everyone becomes a kid on their first trip there. We had 11 people who made the entire trip and 8 others who joined us two or three at a time. Of the total 19 people, 2 had traveled most of the world by air. Four had thousands of sea days from the US to Europe to South America to the Pacific. But none other than an Alaskan Pilot/Captain we took had ever been to Alaska. It's so unique. Everywhere you go is a little different but Alaska is another world entirely. Every time someone new joined us and saw their first glacier they became a kid again. Every whale, every animal. Every area of human free nature. It may be 10 years of 15, but we will return one day. Perhaps with some new passengers. Maybe take our niece. She's only 6 months old now. Alaskans are truly a different breed of people as well. I'm referring to those who have lived there all their lives. They've adapted so well to the conditions and love the life they lead. We are ones to find little local stores and local crafts and then just talk to people and we found their lives so interesting. Now they found ours interesting but strange. Some were also concerned because they had kids who had moved or planned to move to the lower 48. We also recommend taking time off the boat long enough to fly over in a sea plane. If I lived in Washington, I'd have to go to Alaska two or three summers to experience more. We spent about two months and had a faster boat to cover more ground but we could have easily spent two or three times as long. We only got to visit 11 towns.

We had ages from 18 to 57 and all had a wonderful time. Nobody got bored or felt they'd ever seen enough.

One last Alaskan story. We had the mother of one of our best friends join us for three weeks. She is from Spain, lived in NY, and when her husband died back to Spain. In the two years she had been on many yachts, none under 200', and all around Europe. But she'd walked through the motions with no real joy in any of it. On the trip, on the first "little boat" she'd ever been on, with us and with her daughter, she found herself again. It was the perfect place to escape from sadness and the rest of the world. Her daughter was overjoyed to be able to say, "I have my mother back." Might it have happened if we'd been somewhere else? Yes. But it happened in Alaska and I think the setting did help it happen. A lot of people do move to Alaska to escape to a new way of living.
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:15 AM   #97
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B&B- You are very complementary towards us "Alaskans Sourdoughs". "Cheechockos" find us different in various degrees. Flattery will win every time!

However, I have to ask. Somewhere in your dissertation you made mention of dirty water and that you hoped we (Alaskans) would do something about it. Could you elaborate? My first thought being that you had witnessed or partook of creek/stream water that was undulated with high water residue from some of our normal heavy rain conditions. This is asked as many of us have piped stream water directly into our rural homes or in our case, we collect water off the roof (Bird (Eagle mostly)dropping on rare occasion) treated with a dab of Clorox during the year (5000-+ gallon tanks),
Communities have treated water systems.

Was it some sort of human activity you witnessed that threatened the water? Or was it a salmon stream with tons of deceased fish laying about?

As I pondered your comment thinking of a proper response was stumped till just a few moments ago a quote from W.C. Fields came to my attention.

"I never drink water because of the disgusting things that fish do in it.."
- W. C. Fields

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Old 02-17-2015, 01:34 AM   #98
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As I pondered your comment thinking of a proper response was stumped till just a few moments ago a quote from W.C. Fields came to my attention."I never drink water because of the disgusting things that fish do in it.."
- W. C. Fields

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Isn`t the quote "I never drink water because fish **** in it"? (That should activate the cuss filter).
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:56 AM   #99
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Thanks you guys!

It's threads like this that remind me why we live here.

Sometime look up a poem by an author who spent time here. The poem is called

The spell of the Yukon by Robert Service.

We were at San Diego Zoo a couple of months ago.

When we saw the polar bears I looked over at my wife and said " I'd bet I'm the only guy here today that has seen one of these in the wild." In reality I've been less than 10 feet from a polar bear in the wild.
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:28 AM   #100
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Somewhere in your dissertation you made mention of dirty water and that you hoped we (Alaskans) would do something about it. Could you elaborate? My first thought being that you had witnessed or partook of creek/stream water that was undulated with high water residue from some of our normal heavy rain conditions. This is asked as many of us have piped stream water directly into our rural homes or in our case, we collect water off the roof (Bird (Eagle mostly)dropping on rare occasion) treated with a dab of Clorox during the year (5000-+ gallon tanks),
Communities have treated water systems.
It was a combination of things. First was probably expectation. I think we thought of Alaska with glaciers and low population would have beautiful crystal clear water throughout. However there is a lot of run off that makes it more like some of the lakes around where I grew up and even the one we lived on. No one dived in our lake because they couldn't see more than two feet. That was just the makeup of the soil. Also, the issue of logs, trees, etc. Certainly the amount of rain at various times, impacts things. As a comparison we live on a typical Fort Lauderdale canal. Every house has a wall holding the land back and protecting against the water. Plus every lot is developed. So, there is virtually no runoff. It makes sense that a lesser populated and developed area is going to have far more collected with storms.

However, I also heard from locals of efforts to clean the water and read some of the problems that are being addressed on petroleum hydrocarbons in some areas. I looked at the state's division of water and see Juneau has five waterbodies that are impaired, each having a recovery plan. They list nine different areas as having problems. Some of the local fishermen made comments as well, and things we heard when visiting some of the fish processors, so much of that comment was both observations and anecdotal.

I'm not saying any of it can't be treated and made into drinking water. I certainly know many cities on major rivers that get their drinking water from the same lake they dump their sewage.

I guess for some reason I thought Alaska might be that one state with no water pollution issues and so it surprised me that it has problems like everyone else. And in appearance, perhaps I was expecting the Bahamas.

Didn't mean any of this as a slight or detracting from a wonderful visit, just as something that caught me a little by surprise. Ultimately it was a combination of what I was seeing but also concerns I heard from local residents.
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