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Old 06-06-2014, 02:27 AM   #21
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I just did a non stop from Bellingham to Ketchikan, it took about 36 hours on the Kennicott.
Oh, that little Trinity Yacht....lol
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:26 AM   #22
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Go north young man! (Heading to Alaska)

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You guessed it. Going to do Alaska. Return to Port Angeles. Then go to Canada. Just felt it was easier this way plus did it based on guests at various times of our trip. So easy to just cross from Port Angeles to Victoria and then enjoy Canada. Return from Vancouver to Port Angeles. The other reality is that even in two months you can't see all you'd like to.



As to route, we're going up on the inside, returning on the outside. Prefer daylight but feel like we're well equipped both from the captain side and the equipment side for it. We'll go slower at night. Plus dark is rather on the short side. Sunrise today in Ketchikan was 4:09 AM and sunset was 9:22 PM. Taking a half hour before and half hour after for light, that only leaves you with 6 1/2 hours or so of darkness. We will not take chances. We'd change the plans in an instant if circumstances warranted. Fog is a far greater concern than dark to us.



Yes, odd route. Not what we'd necessarily recommend for others.

Going up the inside, in the dark , at 15 knots, you had better be on a ferry or a heavy steel hulled tug or fishing boat ! !

Please Do NOT underestimate the log and flotsam problem!

I recommend clearing Canada Customs, it is not a big issue but will become one if you encounter hull or running gear damage and need to dock somewhere in Canada where there are no local Customs Officers!


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Old 06-06-2014, 06:39 PM   #23
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Here is a link to a very detailed guide put out by NW Explorations. It has a Bellingham to Ketchikan route you may find useful.

http://www.nwexplorations.com/docume...-ketchikan.pdf
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:00 PM   #24
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Here is a link to a very detailed guide put out by NW Explorations. It has a Bellingham to Ketchikan route you may find useful.

http://www.nwexplorations.com/docume...-ketchikan.pdf
Darn. I forgot about that one, although we've used it too. Glad you mentioned it.
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:04 PM   #25
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Here are possible stops on our list from Vancouver to Ketchikan. Now recognize our list is slanted toward marinas and predominantly those able to accommodate larger boats.

Pender Harbour
Saltery Bay
Powell River
Desolation Sound
Cortes Island
Campbell River
Port McNeill
Port Hardy
Bella Bella
Prince Rupert

You'll notice also that the majority of those have ferry routes to them. To us that is a positive factor as those are likely to be very navigable routes.
Now I'm confused. Your post #2 says you're planning to go non-stop from Bellingham to Ketchikan, and this post says Vancouver to Ketchikan with potential stops along the way.

Did you change your plans entirely, or did I miss something?
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:25 PM   #26
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I add my $.02 of caution regarding running AT ANY SPEED at night thru BC. Last time I transited Finlayson Channel past Klemtu last summer, it was like driving on the freeway after a logging truck dumped it's load. There were logs everywhere. And your running gear won't give a whit if you're going slow or not if you smack a nice 18" x 40' cedar log. It'll be toast. Be very, very watchful.

Not clearing into Canada on the trip? Should you be delayed by mechanical issues (see previous paragraph), or weather (highly likely, even in summer) and are forced to come to anchor in Canadian waters, be prepared to spend major time in discussions with the RCMP. They really frown on illegals in-country, which you immediately become when your anchor hits bottom, or you are hauled for repairs. And it's a snap clearing into Canada, into USA in Ketchikan, and vice versa on southbound trip.

Enjoy your trip. Ferry route is easy, but they run at speed 24/7 (big, steel, etc.). And you'd be well served to stay out of there way. But even the BC Ferrys have had issues with "things" in the water at night (ref: Queen of the North).

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Old 06-06-2014, 07:37 PM   #27
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Now I'm confused. Your post #2 says you're planning to go non-stop from Bellingham to Ketchikan, and this post says Vancouver to Ketchikan with potential stops along the way.

Did you change your plans entirely, or did I miss something?
No, not at all. Just have always had multiple options and so did research various stops. We're prepared for anything. We never travel without knowing in advance if trouble arose in any given spot where we'd head or if we just wanted to change plans.

Was just providing information for the OP in that post. We can easily remove a day in Washington, add one or two on the trip North to Ketchikan. We have yet to stick to our planned schedule for any cruising and doubt we ever will. Always get the latest reports on conditions too. Maybe shadow the M/V Columbia. Not likely.

Sorry to have confused you. For now we've escaped back out from Lake Union and Lake Washington. I'd hate to see that lock on a holiday or even weekend.
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:46 PM   #28
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No worries as I am sometimes easily confused!

I don't think I've ever stuck exactly to a plan on the water either.
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Old 06-06-2014, 08:12 PM   #29
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Ok, ok, night travel will be difficult for a lot of us, logs are definitely a danger BandB seems to have a mission and a plan, . now back to my question...surely there are a lot of folks on here that have done this trip. Looking for advice, routes, tips, don't miss locations.


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Well sir, I think this is a crazy idea. For most people this is a trip of a lifetime, usually a 4-5 week passage, not 9 days. There are hundreds of must see spots, but your going to miss most of them because you have a time line to adhere to, and you'll need to settle for the closest safe anchorage or marina at the end of your day. You will be traveling when you shouldn't be because you won't have the time to wait for better weather.

If you take the route via Seymour Narrows, the slack tide will dictate when you go, not you. The whirl pools are huge. If you go the inner route, you have four sets of rapids to hit at slack tide, and they can't be done all together because they are to far apart.

Crossing the bigger bodies of water is almost always a early morning (daybreak) start. You want to be across them before the afternoon winds pick up.

Make sure you have all the Douglass travel guides and the 2014 Waggoner cruising guide for the most up to date marina information. Good luck.
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Old 06-06-2014, 08:32 PM   #30
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Well sir, I think this is a crazy idea. For most people this is a trip of a lifetime, usually a 4-5 week passage, not 9 days. There are hundreds of must see spots, but your going to miss most of them because you have a time line to adhere to, and you'll need to settle for the closest safe anchorage or marina at the end of your day. You will be traveling when you shouldn't be because you won't have the time to wait for better weather.
To commit to any length if it leads you to not respect weather on any cruise anywhere is wrong. Schedules must be in pencil, not pen.

Now as to nine days at 10-12 knots, it could be five 15 hour days, leaving four days free or 6 hours per day every day. It's more a delivery than cruise. But he doesn't indicate that's the end of his cruising in Alaska. If this is to just get the boat to Ketchikan and he has much more planned later, then so be it. I'm guessing his trip may be limited by time off. Then enjoy it as it is. Just don't push on if conditions say not to.

In our case we're planning 60 total days of which 40 will be in Alaska. That's still not many. Would be easy to spend 90 but we've chosen a 60 day cruise for now. That being the case we then had to choose those areas we wanted most to see. We chose to stop in 11 locations. Easily a hundred possible. The Sunshine Coast of BC wasn't in our top 11 for stops and overnights and days. More for passing by. Doesn't mean there isn't plenty to see. But with 11 we'll get to explore each of them at least a couple or three days. And the good thing is that one day we'll probably return and there will still be plenty to see that we missed this trip.

Longest we've ever held over because of weather was Panama City, FL. for 6 days.
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:11 PM   #31
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The idea of not clearing customs baffles me. You can't go ashore, take on fuel, or a person, and depending on your luck anchor or fish. All so you can, what, carry more booze? And handguns?

Then it hit me - someone on that boat might have had a DUI. Game over for them clearing customs. If that's the case, then have them fly up. If it's the owner/operator, have someone deliver the boat.

If I'm in the right track, this is even a worse idea than it originally seemed (which was, as others have said, a bad idea to start with)
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:23 PM   #32
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The idea of not clearing customs baffles me. You can't go ashore, take on fuel, or a person, and depending on your luck anchor or fish. All so you can, what, carry more booze? And handguns?

Then it hit me - someone on that boat might have had a DUI. Game over for them clearing customs. If that's the case, then have them fly up. If it's the owner/operator, have someone deliver the boat.

If I'm in the right track, this is even a worse idea than it originally seemed (which was, as others have said, a bad idea to start with)
No, frankly not even close. The only thought on customs was food (we have some meats basically for two months and an average of ten people, other items a couple of weeks worth) and just spending the time clearing twice when we weren't going to spend any time in a location. We have no issue clearing. We've done all the advance work. We're all prepared. And we will clear later to visit Victoria and Vancouver. Just on the trip from Bellingham to Ketchikan we're basically transiting.

No one on the boat has any criminal record, dui's, we carry no guns and no drugs. The most dangerous thing aboard would be champagne. We've cleared customs at least a dozen times in the past year. And rest assured returning to Fort Lauderdale is a pain as clearing is at the airport. So we get everyone registered prior to the trip.

I think your assumptions are pretty insulting but assume you just were at a loss for reasons. Perhaps next time ask first.
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:32 PM   #33
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On last years trip we were boarded three times by the RCMP.Once while at anchor and twice while tied at a marina. They were just checking to see if we had cleared customs and looked at our passports. They were very polite and everything went well. So like someone else mentioned, if you had to stop for an emergency, just be aware.
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:06 PM   #34
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Might want to check out this website:Reporting Requirements for Private Boaters

Here is a copy and paste of a section:
"Not planning to "land" your vessel or did you leave Canadian waters but did not land on U.S. soil? You still need to report to the CBSA. Certain private boaters may contact the CBSA by calling the TRC at 1-888-226-7277 from their cellular telephones upon arrival in Canadian waters.
This includes:
Canadian citizens and permanent residents who have not landed on U.S. soil; and
U.S. citizens and permanent residents who do not plan on landing on Canadian soil."
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:14 PM   #35
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Might want to check out this website:Reporting Requirements for Private Boaters

Here is a copy and paste of a section:
"Not planning to "land" your vessel or did you leave Canadian waters but did not land on U.S. soil? You still need to report to the CBSA. Certain private boaters may contact the CBSA by calling the TRC at 1-888-226-7277 from their cellular telephones upon arrival in Canadian waters.
This includes:
Canadian citizens and permanent residents who have not landed on U.S. soil; and
U.S. citizens and permanent residents who do not plan on landing on Canadian soil."
Yes, a simple phone call if you don't plan to land. If we do decide to land on the trip North then we'll just go to Vancouver the day before instead of Bellingham. Nothing complicated about Canada.
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:33 PM   #36
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Both Canada and US authorities can match up AIS signals/MMSI with respective customs groups. Not clearing customs if a pleasure boater is baffling to me, and authorities too. A few years ago we were crossing Dixon Entrance and listened on VHF as Canada customs called various small boats on water by lat lons from a satellite feed and asking details on vessel and itinerary. The commercial fishing and barge guys going between WA and AK non-stop report in as they approach and get fit into traffic lanes, a simple procedure but requiring customs clearance if a problem arises and they touch land.

US and Canada share data continuously as vessel movements are monitored. Good news I believe.

To the OP - as suggested by others, get out the tide and current tables, Waggoner and Douglas and do what the rest of us do, plan the trip. Weather data galore exists to chase down the Johnstone Strait, Cape Caution and Dixon Entrance gales - common this time of the year.
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Old 06-06-2014, 11:00 PM   #37
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In our case, we're fully Canpass'ed going to Canada. Don't have I-68 for US. Still clearing not likely to be a big deal.

Would be interested in how many of you US to Canada and back travelers have Nexus, Canpass, I-68's?

Just a question of curiosity.
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Old 06-06-2014, 11:54 PM   #38
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In our case, we're fully Canpass'ed going to Canada. Don't have I-68 for US. Still clearing not likely to be a big deal.

Would be interested in how many of you US to Canada and back travelers have Nexus, Canpass, I-68's?

Just a question of curiosity.
Why bother with the hassle of these?..
In 10+ Canadian customs stops it has never taken over 20 minutes ..most times about 10 minutes from tie up to untie.

Running a small boat North on the inside at night is just plain stupid. No amount of electronics can protect you from the deadheads..I love running at night but not up the inside.
I sometimes run a fast boat between Port Townsend and Seattle at night and I keep my fingers crossed every time..and most times we do hit something..but so far nothing too serious. North of the border I would never consider it.
Just because you can doesn't mean you should.
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Old 06-07-2014, 12:05 AM   #39
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Why bother with the hassle of these?..
In 10+ Canadian customs stops it has never taken over 20 minutes ..most times about 10 minutes from tie up to untie.
Hollywood
Agreed, never more than 10-15 minutes (unless you're waiting to get to the dock), and I've done it probably no less than 25 times. However, U.S customs is a different story.

Voluntarily running at night there? Not no way, not no how.
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Old 06-07-2014, 12:08 AM   #40
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Agreed, never more than 10-15 minutes, and I've done it probably no less than 25 times. However, U.S customs is a different story.
That's what we'd heard is Canadian customs easy but then Canpass easy too. US customs variable as to time but I-68's not worth fooling with for one or two trips.
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