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Old 08-23-2019, 08:54 PM   #1
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Globe Drivesaver worked as designed

Somehow, no idea how, a bow line ended up in the prop. Discovered I had no reverse, went back and forth, regained reverse, but port engine hi temp alarm went off. Light goes off and I pulled in remains of 3/4" bow line.
Shaft cutters apparently worked, sort of. Globe Drivesaver now looks like a potato chip. Hate to think of what my transmission would have looked like. Guessing the damper spline would give first.

Diving on the prop tomorrow. New Drivesaver on order.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:43 AM   #2
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Kinda depends.


I have had several motors choked off by running aground, heck the assistance boat was choked off probably 50-100 times in the 15 years I ran it. And have seen plenty more.



Borg Warners and Twin Discs...neither ever showed damage.


I wonder what types of incidents does it really take to damage a tranny or what trannys are susceptible?


I have heard of wrapped lines pulling engines off mounts too. Funny how it's not consistent.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:50 AM   #3
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Kinds depends.

I have heard of wrapped lines pulling engines off mounts too. Funny how it's not consistent.
That happened to a friend of mine on his MT 38. Attempting to grab a mooring at Block Island. Wife had a line set up on the gunnel and it fell overboard. When the boat backed to do a second try for the ball, the line tangled in his prop and pulled the mounts.
He had to get towed back to Mystic.
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Old 08-24-2019, 08:25 AM   #4
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I wrapped a 5/8 nylon 3 strand slip rope around my prop in my slip long ago.
It yanked boat over hard against a wood piling, and snapped the line and engine was simply idling in gear.

Left over slip rope looked badly frayed where the propr cut it. That was not a new rope, I had used it a long time.

Nothing happened to anything except I had a section of rope around the shaft and prop. I used the boat a few more months and when I hauled, it was like a rope blob. Jammed on so tight I cut it off with a blade.

After that I made sure all line I placed up over the piling tops when I took out boat from slip.

I also learned you cant trust non boating people to know what to do with your lines.
Even though it was my responsibility to check, they just dropped them in the water when we left for the day and I forgot to check the lines.
My friend Rodney who had done that dove under the boat, but it was useless, said he could not stay down to cut the rope off. I mean it was still my fault t happened.
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Old 08-24-2019, 08:39 AM   #5
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Generally the more of a shock load something gives, the more chance there is of something breaking.



If it just gets loaded up to the point of stalling (especially at idle), it'll likely stall before stuff breaks (even more so with a carbed gas engine that won't throttle up to try to keep idle speed).



If the prop hits something and stops suddenly, there's a much greater chance of something snapping.
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Old 08-24-2019, 09:59 AM   #6
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I thought the DS was supposed to shatter. That you can drive home.
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Old 08-24-2019, 11:59 AM   #7
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If that saver had done its advertised job, the shaft would be parted from the output flange. I had that experience recently. The bolts molded into the saver ripped right out of the hard rubber. Looking at the distorted saver suggests to me that something has been bent, either the shaft or the output flange, or both. If it were I, I wouldn't simply replace the saver. I would also have the shaft pulled to check for staightness and realign the engine, in the water.
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Old 08-24-2019, 02:49 PM   #8
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Replace the saver and use a blank to check for vibration/alignment before you pull everything....no reason to assume something is bent yet
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Old 08-24-2019, 03:08 PM   #9
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Better idea but what do you mean by a "blank"? A spacer I assume? Sure, install the spacer and check alignment. In any case, that picture sure is disconcerting.
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Replace the saver and use a blank to check for vibration/alignment before you pull everything....no reason to assume something is bent yet
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Old 08-24-2019, 06:13 PM   #10
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Diver removed the rest of the line wrapped around the shaft today. Shaft runs true at stuffing box, wobbles at Drivesaver as expected. Would quickly destroy reduction gear bearing and seal if run for any length of time. I will check carefully after installation of new saver.

Shaft cutter (Spurs) stationary cutter ring is gone. Not surprised. It isn't designed to cut through 3/4" line. Something had to give. Interesting comments about what should happen with Drivesaver. I agree, engine would typically stall with rope around shaft without a saver. If rope is wrapped around shaft like an iron band I would expect saver to shear.

In this case I could turn shaft with pipe wrench so decided to use engine to return to marina. Engine got pretty toasty (247 just below injectors, Infrared on Lehman 90, close to head warping range) so shutdown and Seatow put me back into slip. In theory I should have boiled over at 235 and blown a hose. Dash alarm went off at 220 but hard to hear due to engine noise. Will probably install a relay to trigger a high pitched alarm and an LED.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:00 PM   #11
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This is not a good result. If the shaft wobbled at the saver that means the shaft is bent. You say that the shaft could not be rotated without the use of a pipe wrench. That suggests to me that there was a LOT of binding going on at the transmission because of a bent shaft. I say that because of a very similar experience. Aftercreplacing a blown saver, I started my engine and observed for 10 seconds before running up and shutting down the engine. Plus, you overheated the engine to a dangerous level. As a result, by running the engine you now may have ruined your engine and the transmission. The transmission can be replaced at moderate cost, the engine not so much. I don't get it. Just looking at that damaged assembly one can see that could be something significantly wrong. Question. While running was thectransmission making howling sounds?

Perhaps I am completely wrong here and I apologize if I am way off base but ...
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Diver removed the rest of the line wrapped around the shaft today. Shaft runs true at stuffing box, wobbles at Drivesaver as expected. Would quickly destroy reduction gear bearing and seal if run for any length of time. I will check carefully after installation of new saver.

Shaft cutter (Spurs) stationary cutter ring is gone. Not surprised. It isn't designed to cut through 3/4" line. Something had to give. Interesting comments about what should happen with Drivesaver. I agree, engine would typically stall with rope around shaft without a saver. If rope is wrapped around shaft like an iron band I would expect saver to shear.

In this case I could turn shaft with pipe wrench so decided to use engine to return to marina. Engine got pretty toasty (247 just below injectors, Infrared on Lehman 90, close to head warping range) so shutdown and Seatow put me back into slip. In theory I should have boiled over at 235 and blown a hose. Dash alarm went off at 220 but hard to hear due to engine noise. Will probably install a relay to trigger a high pitched alarm and an LED.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:56 PM   #12
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I think the jury is still out on this one.

One possibility is that the saver did do its job and the reason that it is buckled is that it bent before the shaft. Why didn't it break? Possibly it was just a fraction of a second from doing that.

Another possibility is that the shaft bent or transmission broke before the shaft saver broke, and so it didn't do its job in protecting the shaft.

Another (seemingly far less likely) possibility is that there was another problem in the system, such as weak struts that bent before the saver or the shaft and messed things up. When I bought my Californian, I had to replace both main struts. One of them was bent from an apparent rope entanglement. It was too sponge like to be worked (it must have had zinc in the "bronze"?), so I replaced both. The shaft was only slightly out of true and there was no damage elsewhere. (I ended up replacing both shafts due to corrosion at the stuffing boxes).

I hope SoWhat (I think the OP) lets us know the end of the story after it unfolds. I'm certainly sorry for the trouble!
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Old 08-24-2019, 09:51 PM   #13
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This is not a good result. If the shaft wobbled at the saver that means the shaft is bent. You say that the shaft could not be rotated without the use of a pipe wrench.
Pipe wrench was used to determine why engine was overheating. Concluded line was wrapped around shaft due to difficulty turning it. Now that diver has removed the line, shaft turns freely. I ran engine in reverse and forward for a few minutes to determine if any damage was apparent. None noticed.

The transmission was and still is whisper quiet (I rebuilt it with all new bearings) and engine sounds fine. No vibrations or any strange noises. Transmission coupling ran true and engine mounts OK. I didn't want to push things because the out of round drivesaver will trash my rear bearing and seal. Once I replace it I will align couplings to spec and run it at the dock for thorough testing.

I agree with the opinion that the saver was seconds from shearing. Velvet drives are massive and although the spurs didn't cut through they probably abraded the line enough to weaken it. I will update this post when new drivesaver arrives.
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Old 08-24-2019, 10:00 PM   #14
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Hey SoWhat,

You are actually the first person I know who actually has these. I some questions for you, if you don't mind:

1) If this were a "get home" situation, could one remove the DriveSaver and reattach the shaft to the transmission "in water"? (Assuming one kept the original bolts, etc, even if they aren't used in DriveSaver install).

2) I'm assuming that the port and starboard DriverSavers are the same, so one could keep a 3rd one aboard as a spare?

Thanks so very much!

-Greg
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Old 08-24-2019, 10:10 PM   #15
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Somehow, no idea how, a bow line ended up in the prop. Discovered I had no reverse, went back and forth, regained reverse, but port engine hi temp alarm went off. Light goes off and I pulled in remains of 3/4" bow line.
Shaft cutters apparently worked, sort of. Globe Drivesaver now looks like a potato chip. Hate to think of what my transmission would have looked like. Guessing the damper spline would give first.

Diving on the prop tomorrow. New Drivesaver on order.
Looks like the shaft simply pulled back.
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Old 08-24-2019, 10:22 PM   #16
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1) If this were a "get home" situation, could one remove the DriveSaver and reattach the shaft to the transmission "in water"?

Maybe. Depends on how far your prop is from the strut. In my case no. I would have to pull the shaft 1" forward and I have spurs installed so little bare shaft behind strut.

Note that you have to push the shaft back a few inches to install the Allen bolts onto the Transmission coupling. Then pull the shaft coupling tight to the saver and install the hex bolts.


2) I'm assuming that the port and starboard DriverSavers are the same, so one could keep a 3rd one aboard as a spare?

I have 1 1/2" shafts and use 504 savers. They are interchangeable. $300 ea. My spare is Seatow.
-Gary
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Old 08-24-2019, 10:26 PM   #17
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Hi Gary,

Thanks so much!

(My questions probably hint at my own estimation of how this will have turned out in the end...)

Thanks again!
-Greg
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:16 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by gkesden View Post
Hey SoWhat,

You are actually the first person I know who actually has these. I some questions for you, if you don't mind:

1) If this were a "get home" situation, could one remove the DriveSaver and reattach the shaft to the transmission "in water"? (Assuming one kept the original bolts, etc, even if they aren't used in DriveSaver install).

2) I'm assuming that the port and starboard DriverSavers are the same, so one could keep a 3rd one aboard as a spare?

Thanks so very much!

-Greg
If you have enough room between the prop and cutlass you could drop the DS out and limp home.
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:32 AM   #19
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I'm still trying to visualize how these things work...

Let's say I have enough shaft now (I do), I unbolt it, push it back, drop one of these in, and bolt it back up. Now, I've got one of these installed, right? That is all there is to it?

Now, let's say I catch a rope. Ouch! And it deforms or breaks as designed. Supposing nothing bad happens when my engine goes from a cruise load, to a huge load, to no load in seconds (this sounds like a bit of stress on all the important stuff), getting going again seems like it'd be really easy.

Snorkel and cut off rope (easy, right?) Unbolt DriveSaver. Remove it. Slide in a bolt up new drive saver. Or, alternately, just slide shaft forward and bolt up. Rotate shaft with wrench as needed, of course.

So, I guess I am wondering. Even if I didn't have a spare, why would I be limping? Wouldn't I just be good to go?
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Old 08-25-2019, 01:17 AM   #20
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I'm still trying to visualize how these things work...

Let's say I have enough shaft now (I do), I unbolt it, push it back, drop one of these in, and bolt it back up. Now, I've got one of these installed, right? That is all there is to it?

Now, let's say I catch a rope. Ouch! And it deforms or breaks as designed. Supposing nothing bad happens when my engine goes from a cruise load, to a huge load, to no load in seconds (this sounds like a bit of stress on all the important stuff), getting going again seems like it'd be really easy.

Snorkel and cut off rope (easy, right?) Unbolt DriveSaver. Remove it. Slide in a bolt up new drive saver. Or, alternately, just slide shaft forward and bolt up. Rotate shaft with wrench as needed, of course.

So, I guess I am wondering. Even if I didn't have a spare, why would I be limping? Wouldn't I just be good to go?
See installation instructions at https://www.globemarinedirect.com/category-s/184.htm

There are other brands of flexible couplings but Globe came with my boat. If they shear, they are toast. Prop is disconnected and they must be replaced.
If they distort, (as mine did into a potato chip shape) then you might be able to go a short distance at very low speed. The distorted saver will rotate with an oblong motion rather than a circular motion and will ruin transmission thrust bearings and rear seal. Proceed at your own risk.

Unlikely you will be able to cut line with a snorkle. Several years ago I hooked a pot warp. Stern was crashing down from 6-8' up. I was under it with a snorkle and a knife trying to saw through the line. Extremely dangerous situation.

I finally hooked line with a grapnel and winched it up so I could saw through it. A line wrapped around your shaft will be like iron. You will need a serrated blade, a utility razor, and a screw driver. If you don't drop anything it will take 30-60 minutes to clear.

Having a spare saver is no help until wrapped line is removed. Having a complete scuba rig onboard would have helped in a remote location but Seatow was 15min away so was best option.
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