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Old 04-26-2010, 04:45 AM   #41
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

".in short, yes, you should be able to. It does not need to be a stump-pulling effort."



However the chance that you could back down far too hard for the windlass to handle is real.

When anchoring the deck claw which should be able to hold the boat in extreme conditions only takes a second to flip in., to have Zero load on the windlass.

After the boat stops from the set anchor ,another 30 ft of chain with a 15 ft LIGHT nylon snubber can be released.
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Old 04-26-2010, 05:04 AM   #42
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

I personally do not leave the load on the windlass. If you have nylon, then cleat off the anchor line. If you have all chain, use a snubber or a jury rigged one like Marin has. There is no reason to put extra load on the hardware if you don't have to. And like FF said, something can go wrong if that is all you are relying on...risk management...remember????
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Old 04-26-2010, 11:37 AM   #43
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Getting Used to Fear

If you don't have room for a deck or pulpit mounted chain grabber or you have combo rode then get ahold of a chain GRAB hook and a piece of line secured to it, 20 or 30' . Use triple lay nylon rope for best shock absorbtion. When you are on all chain then attach the GRAB hook to the chain and tie off the rope to your sampson post or heavy anchoring cleat to take the load off the windlass shaft. GRAB hooks must be purchased for the size of the chain. They can be pretty, S.S., or galvanized. Use two for a bridle effect if you wish.

The line should be the same size or bigger than the anchor line if you have chain/rope rode.

I've seen windlass shafts bent or clutches damaged from overload unless your windlass is made to handle the load, usually not, so secure the load off the windlass. For that reason, when backing down to set the anchor do it slowly so you don't jerk the boat to a stop but put a load on it slowly and as evenly as possible.




-- Edited by C lectric on Monday 26th of April 2010 11:38:04 AM
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Old 04-26-2010, 04:59 PM   #44
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Getting Used to Fear

We have a snubber already rigged. Chain hook and a Y-shaped rig that goes out to each of the bow cleats. It's just kind of a bitch to deploy and you really only want to do it once. So that why I was asking about setting it with the windlass.

There is another little do-hickey that currently is just kind os a safety rig to keep the chain from falling off while underway. I don't suppose that it can hold much weight.

Let me see if I can attach a pic for you guys to see my anchor tackle. Hang on a sec...




So just starboard of the windlass is the thingy in question. It's really just a threaded bolt into that galvanized plate that holds the chain... Anyway, I bet I already know the answer to that question, but I'd like an overall assessment of the rig too. Skinny Dippin' weighs 19,000 displacement pounds. That is a 35# generic CQR.


-- Edited by GonzoF1 on Monday 26th of April 2010 05:04:39 PM
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Old 04-26-2010, 05:03 PM   #45
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Oh... What is a good battery health gauge? Any trouble to install myself? (I do have mad maintenance skilz!)
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Old 04-26-2010, 06:16 PM   #46
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

There are several on the market, Link make one and I use a Cruz Pro VAH 110.

It monitors voltage of up to three banks and measures current draw on the house batts, *provides Amp hours remaining and % remaining. Positioned in the pilot house but with a nice big LCD display, so easily read from the saloon.*

The installation is really simple as is the calibration and all the instructions are provided. Just a matter of deciding where to mount it, and running wires from your DC switchboard (for voltage) and from your shunt (supplied) in the battery box (for current and amphours).

Allow a couple of hours for the complete instal.
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Old 04-26-2010, 08:29 PM   #47
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Quote:
GonzoF1 wrote:

We have a snubber already rigged. Chain hook and a Y-shaped rig that goes out to each of the bow cleats. It's just kind of a bitch to deploy and you really only want to do it once. So that why I was asking about setting it with the windlass.

There is another little do-hickey that currently is just kind os a safety rig to keep the chain from falling off while underway. I don't suppose that it can hold much weight.

Let me see if I can attach a pic for you guys to see my anchor tackle. Hang on a sec...




So just starboard of the windlass is the thingy in question. It's really just a threaded bolt into that galvanized plate that holds the chain... Anyway, I bet I already know the answer to that question, but I'd like an overall assessment of the rig too. Skinny Dippin' weighs 19,000 displacement pounds. That is a 35# generic CQR.


-- Edited by GonzoF1 on Monday 26th of April 2010 05:04:39 PM
don't pull on the chain stopper, just rig a short line with a chain hook and attach it to the Sampson post and set the hook that way

*
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Old 04-26-2010, 11:00 PM   #48
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Can a Sampson Post stand that kind of pressure?
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Old 04-27-2010, 01:17 AM   #49
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Quote:
Peter B wrote:If not do it the traditional way, but with Rocna or Sarca there is no need for strong bursts in reverse....truly.
We don't use strong bursts, we use idle power.* The recommended method to set the Rocna was described to me over the phone by one of the folks at Rocna in New Zealand.* Figuring they probably had a notion of the best method to set their anchor, we followed their advice after we bought one.* I'm sure there are other setting methods that will work equally well but Rocna's advice has not let us down yet.

The strength of a bow pulpit varies with the make and model of the boat, and possibly with age if it can affect fastener condition.* I've seen the pulpit break on a relatively modern production boat when the owner tried to use the boat's power to free a hung-up anchor.* I have also read accounts of and seen photos of windlasses that were pulled partway or all the way out of a deck by having too much strain put on them.* And I've read numerous accounts on various forums over the years of windlasses that had gear teeth stripped and other failures from having too-high strains put on them.

Our use of a short heavy snubber to set the anchor against and to un-set it if it is reluctant to come out takes only moments to rig and eliminates the potential risk of overstraining the pulpit's 37-year-old fastners and the windlass.* They may be able to take much more pressure than I give them credit for.* I don't know.* But I don't want to find out by having something break when I can eliminate the risk entirely by using a setting snubber and* a deck cleat.* The extra 15 seconds it takes to rig the snubber is well worth the elimination of the potential to damage a $4,000 windlass installation.
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Old 04-27-2010, 01:22 AM   #50
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Quote:
GonzoF1 wrote:

Can a Sampson Post stand that kind of pressure?
If it's a true Sampson post, yes it can.* That's what it's intended for.* A true Sampson post generally runs all the way down to the keel or some other primary structural member in the boat's hull and is one of the strongest structural components of the boat.* There are also Sampson posts that are through-bolted to heavy back plates under the deck.* And there are "decorative" Sampson posts that are bolted to a pulpit or other deck-mounted structure.* So just because something is called a "Sampson post" does not automatically mean it can take a high degree of pressure.* It will depend on its construction and method of attachment to the boat.
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Old 04-27-2010, 08:21 PM   #51
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Here's an old wreck in the Napa River, California.* The samson post is the only thing left....
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Old 04-27-2010, 08:42 PM   #52
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Someone could use a good buffing.
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Old 04-27-2010, 10:51 PM   #53
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Here's a little beauty I found down the bayou on Louisiana, Highway 1, on the way to Grand Isle. I never did see the samson post.
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Old 04-28-2010, 06:40 PM   #54
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Hey Carey,
When did you make it to Louisiana?
Boy, it looks like we may get a serious oil slick down there. Maybe they can get it to burn off.
BTW Giggitoni,
that does look to be a properly installed Samson post.
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:04 AM   #55
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Getting Used to Fear

I think one thing I need to do is make a single snubber line that can just loop over the Sampson post, run thru the bow sprit, and on to a chain hook. Our current one, like I said before, is a bit of a pain to deploy and not practical to help set an anchor. Being able to have a simple hook that the First Mate can easily hook on and off of the chain to fully set and anchor seems like it would be a huge plus. It could also work good as a lunch hook for times where fully setting and anchor may not be necessary.

Yes? No?

*EDIT* Going back to my picture of my bow on the previous page, I wonder if this is reall a good idea. The windlass is in direct line with the post and I don't see a way to do what I described above... Hmmmmmmm

-- Edited by GonzoF1 on Thursday 29th of April 2010 08:07:41 AM
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Old 04-30-2010, 07:02 AM   #56
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Getting Used to Fear

No, that's quite a good idea Gonzo - pretty much what I do for most anchoring actually. Just run the snubbing line over the rope rode side of the windlass. I'm not totally convinced that having such a long snubber like some do, with a huge loop of chain dangling below it, is all that necessary for 90% of normal over-nighting - especially as the weather forecasts these days are pretty reliable such that being caught out in the night with an unforecasted blow would be fairly unusual.* After all, with decent weight all chain rode, there is a large amount of snatch damping there already.* Anyway, what if....it just means dashing out with a decent flashlight, maybe in a raincoat, and being a bit uncomfortable for a few minutes while you deploy the 'storm' snubber.

-- Edited by Peter B on Friday 30th of April 2010 07:05:52 AM
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Old 04-30-2010, 07:24 AM   #57
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Quote:
Peter B wrote:

No, that's quite a good idea Gonzo - pretty much what I do for most anchoring actually. Just run the snubbing line over the rope rode side of the windlass. I'm not totally convinced that having such a long snubber like some do, with a huge loop of chain dangling below it, is all that necessary for 90% of normal over-nighting - especially as the weather forecasts these days are pretty reliable such that being caught out in the night with an unforecasted blow would be fairly unusual.* After all, with decent weight all chain rode, there is a large amount of snatch damping there already.* Anyway, what if....it just means dashing out with a decent flashlight, maybe in a raincoat, and being a bit uncomfortable for a few minutes while you deploy the 'storm' snubber.

-- Edited by Peter B on Friday 30th of April 2010 07:05:52 AM
The point in adding additional measures like a bridle is to keep from "dashing out with a decent flashlightin the middle of the night".* If you are concerned about your overnight comfort why not run either a single snubber line ( real easy ) or a snubber bridle ( a little tougher but more stable ) and drop an additional 15' of chain to give it stretch room?????.* Unless you have a manual windless the additional 15 seconds will not even cramp your thumb as you push the windless switch!.
The only real unknown for me regarding anchoring is what condition the bottom is, or what might be on the bottom to foul your anchor and cause it to drag or not set correctly. Both of these are mitigated when we pull back to set the hook under power.
When we used to do our boating in cal. we did a lot of anchoring in very tight coves where you set both a bow and stern hook, we usually were pretty cramped for space with other boats. I would drop over the side and check all the anchors around us to ensure a good nights sleep. I never seased to be shocked how many anchors were improperly set and were holding just because of the pile of chain dropped on top of the hook!.

*
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:08 AM   #58
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Questions:

What route should the single-snubber line I want to use take to get by/around/over the windlass?

How do you know what the bottom is made of before you drop anchor?
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:55 AM   #59
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

For our anchor bridle I use*the *rope/line for towing our run about.* The shackle is tied mid way on a 25 ft line, run thru the two line chocks in each side of the bow, and then cleat to the Samson Post making a V.** That way the line does not go over the windless or pull the*chain to one side.*We mostly use it for towing the run about*as the V keeps the run about centered be hind boat.* Since we very seldom anchor, it has to be good for something?******
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Old 04-30-2010, 09:20 AM   #60
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RE: Getting Used to Fear

Getting over the fear is all about time spent on the water. You get to know how*your boat*feels taking a following sea.*How she rolls and heel when the waves are coming off the aft port quarter. She talks to you as you listen to the engine(s)

Think of it. You park the car and head down the ramp to the float. You walk along looking at other boats, dodging the bow pulpits and the deck boxes along the*way. Then you see her. Your eyes take in her lines you catalog everything out of place. That line is not tight. Those two snaps have come undone again.* there is that little scuff you have been meaning to take care of.
*It's ok she is beautiful. You step off the dock and feel her roll to*take you on.*It's like she is welcoming you on. You open the*door and step inside. *You smell her perfume A little salt a little sweet a little sour. She's ready for you . You check her fluids and turn the key. She comes to life under you hands. You hear and feel that first rumble as she springs to life and then that comfortable vibration as the idle settle out. She's ready to go you can almost feel her straining at the dock lines.
You cast off and slip her into gear.* Out past the break wall. You throttle up a bit and feel her dig in as she takes*those first waves.* *As she warms she sings to you.**You feel the throb and sway as she responds to the wheel. She's a fine lady and you're *the skipper. The adventure *begins. If you've treated her right, She'll take you where ever you want to go and home safe again.*
Fear not my friend all things will come to you with time spent*and water moving under her keel.

SD
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