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Old 02-04-2018, 09:32 PM   #21
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What's her idea of fast? Assuming she can come down from 16 knots.

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Old 02-04-2018, 09:39 PM   #22
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Our President 41 with SP225 Lehmans will do 17 knots wide open. We would never cruise at that speed, but it would cruise at 13. We usually cruise at about 8 to 9 knots. At that speed we are probably much more comfortable than in you planing hull when it does kick up. She has to have trust in you that you will not put her in situations that she is not comfortable with.
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Old 02-04-2018, 11:13 PM   #23
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Wifey B: You're already going slow. Now you want her to go almost stop.

I thought 20-25 knots was like super slow.

Warning: One convinced against their will, remains unconvinced still. There are plenty of boats with decks and all you want that will cruise at 16-17 knots easily. Find the right compromise and work on finding it together. You'll both be happier.
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Old 02-04-2018, 11:19 PM   #24
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Re: post #23. Re-read post #7...
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:00 AM   #25
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Re: post #23. Re-read post #7...
Wifey B: Fast woman and proud of it.
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:16 AM   #26
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Here is a great example that she uses -

We cruised to the Abacos a couple of years ago. We crossed the stream at 17kts and when we got to the Bahama banks off Memory Rock we slowed to 7-8Kts until Great Sale where we stayed the night.

On the return trip we wanted to spend an extra day in GTC so we made the decision to run fast all the way back from CTC to Stuart. We left out at 0700 and pulled into the fuel dock at 1800. 11 hours for a 160nm trip which included us stopping for a bit to fix a dinghy davit.

In her mind, we got an extra day in the Bahamas. In my mind we burned an extra 175 gallons of fuel (about $700 worth.)



This all reminds me of a time I was at an airport walking out on the ramp with the line guy. We both saw a very dressed up woman walking towards a Falcon 50 jet.

I said to him, man that thing is fast. He replied expensive too. I then asked if he was talking about the jet or the woman. He said "both."
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:23 AM   #27
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Few people can afford to go fast in a 50' boat, especially a trawler. It takes a lot of energy to move that much boat that fast.

It's your wife so you are going to have to do the convincing. The only thing I have to offer is, with that 50' wide body boat, you won't have to outrun the weather.

We travel at 7 knots. We can go 11 or 12 at a greatly increased fuel cost and a decrease in comfort so we almost never do.
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:44 AM   #28
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Wifey B: Well, the best example I can give is our Great Loop trip. We saw at least twice as much as the typical looper because of speed. We were able to cruise as fast as 26-28 knots, averaged 15-16 knots with locks and everything. We had twice the time for sightseeing.
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:46 AM   #29
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Wifey B: Well, the best example I can give is our Great Loop trip. We saw at least twice as much as the typical looper because of speed. We were able to cruise as fast as 26-28 knots, averaged 15-16 knots with locks and everything. We had twice the time for sightseeing.
Depends on what you consider "sights" to be seen (as you were blowing by them at 26 knots.....)

There are LOTS more sights to see at a leisurely 7 knots if that is what you are after.

Different strokes.....
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:02 AM   #30
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Depends on what you consider "sights" to be seen (as you were blowing by them at 26 knots.....)

There are LOTS more sights to see at a leisurely 7 knots if that is what you are after.

Different strokes.....
Wifey B: My eyes still work at 26 knots.

As to sights, I'm talking areas of the lakes not normally seen and sights on land not normally seen. Like the entirety of Lake Ontario, both sides of Erie, Georgian Bay, Lake Superior, both sides of Lake Michigan.

Simple case last week as people were talking about crossing the Gulf between Carabelle and Clearwater. One day crossing vs two days and one night. Open water. You don't see more at 7 knots, you see the same water slower. You arrive more tired. Same thing to the Bahamas. You turn an easy day run into two days and a night. Oh, and let's add one more argument. You increase the chance of bad conditions and less comfortable and safe conditions.
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:11 AM   #31
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Wifey B: My eyes still work at 26 knots.

As to sights, I'm talking areas of the lakes not normally seen and sights on land not normally seen. Like the entirety of Lake Ontario, both sides of Erie, Georgian Bay, Lake Superior, both sides of Lake Michigan.

Simple case last week as people were talking about crossing the Gulf between Carabelle and Clearwater. One day crossing vs two days and one night. Open water. You don't see more at 7 knots, you see the same water slower. You arrive more tired. Same thing to the Bahamas. You turn an easy day run into two days and a night. Oh, and let's add one more argument. You increase the chance of bad conditions and less comfortable and safe conditions.
Time is the only factor limiting seeing all of the lakes - has nothing to do with speed. Retirement is the answer for that.

The Loop is 6000+ miles of sights and protected water. Carabelle to Clearwater transit distance is barely over 1% of that.

It's all good.
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:18 AM   #32
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As to sights, I'm talking areas of the lakes not normally seen and sights on land not normally seen. Like the entirety of Lake Ontario, both sides of Erie, Georgian Bay, Lake Superior, both sides of Lake Michigan.
Sorry you missed the very slow Trent-Severn.
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:19 AM   #33
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Time is the only factor limiting seeing all of the lakes - has nothing to do with speed. Retirement is the answer for that.

The Loop is 6000+ miles of sights and protected water. Carabelle to Clearwater transit distance is barely over 1% of that.

It's all good.
When you are able to go faster it does not mean that you cannot slow down and do much lower speeds for much or most of the travel and/or time.
When you do not have the capability to go faster that choice is not able to be considered - that is the point of the OP's post and the issue at hand.
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:21 AM   #34
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Time is the only factor limiting seeing all of the lakes - has nothing to do with speed. Retirement is the answer.

The Loop is 6000+ miles of sights and protected water. Carabelle to Clearwater transit distance is barely over 1% of that.

All good.
Wifey B: Yes, time is a factor. You only have so many years, so many days in life. Time is a limited factor, you don't get it back.

Loop is 6000 or 8000 miles or more. Short cuts or the long way. And it's also time limited by seasons. May to September for the Erie to Illinois part. You don't have longer unless you want to sit and do no boating from September to the next May.

Speed and time are definitely intermingled. Speed = distance over time. Can't make more time so only way to make more distance is more speed.

If you want to go slow, that's fine, but the title of this thread sucks because it presumes that the answer is convincing someone else to go slow and that slow is the one and only right way. It's not. Slow for some, fast for others, but assuming he should be convincing his wife to change is crap.
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:37 AM   #35
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:47 AM   #36
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Boat's speed capability that is chosen by boat owners:


For representation... self contained pleasure boats of let's say 34' to 60'...


Speed is not only due to the shape of hull and size of engines chosen to purchase; but... speed [in other words the boat design that is chosen] has much to do with size of bank account available to keep her fuel tanks filled up!


I know, I know... all the posted-chatter about rolly poly this, hard chine that, snap back, gentle return, following seas, beam seas, hull speed, skinny or deep draft, low cog, trim tabs, stabilizers, steadying sails, etc, etc. Is often [but not always] simply because the particular "boat" mentioned [i.e. chosen] can not go really fast enough when needed.


So here we are again with - - > "... size of bank account available to keep her fuel tanks filled up!" IMO, there are few captains that would not like their craft to be able to get up and go when/if needed. Sure it's fun to also lope along at hull speed and enjoy that leisurely speed... but it's also fun to get up on plane and make some miles asap when desired or required.

Another way to put it!

Speed of the boat chosen to purchase [planing or not] is directly proportional to the angle of the dangle [cash in bank account] times motion of the ocean [need or not for speed] minus the square root of the size of the engines' [in other words... per gallon fuel use]. And is inversely proportional to the mass of the boat’s ass.

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Old 02-05-2018, 10:07 AM   #37
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I read this thread through quickly so perhaps am duplicate existing replies. 17kts does not outrun any storm, unless you mean it allows taking an earlier weather window a day early and do it in daylight. We ran our Marine trader 47 trawler at 8kts cruise but it could hit 17 at WOT with a tanker following behind, 8kts was fast to us as we came from a lifetime of cruising under sail where even with a fast boat, averages of 6-7kts were red letter days. However our sailboats were all very capable of handling bad weather encountered and we love night sails so longer passages were never a problem. We frequently chose to leave or arrive in darkness as the lit approches were often easier to identify.

Seems to me there is a certain lack of confidence at play here with someone not happy to expand their comfort zone.
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Old 02-05-2018, 10:20 AM   #38
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Has anyone mentioned power catamarans yet?
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:02 AM   #39
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For the record, I own a 7 knot trawler and cruise primarily the Chesapeake Bay, but have been to NY and NC. Can someone please validate my understanding that being able to cruise at 17 knots when necessary is not just to outrun storms or having one more day in Bahamas. A planing hull at 17 knots is actually more comfortable in choppy but safe seas than a displacement hull even a 45' long one without stabilizers. IOW the benefit of large engines is not just speed, but comfort. A wallowing 45' trawler without paravanes or active stabilizers is not that comfortable in 6 foot seas, whereas a 40' planing MY can choose a reasonably comfortable course in the same 6 foot seas. So, the benefit of the MY is that it opens up the weather window for a passage and the choices for cruising grounds.
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:04 PM   #40
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Murray.....I love to watch these Grumman Geese load at the resorts. The plane is tipped way to starboard to allow access to the cargo bays. Do these come into Kitimat?
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