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Old 03-03-2016, 11:12 PM   #1
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Gas or electric galley?

Is your galley gas or electric? Or maybe oil, wood or coal?

I like the convenience of propane and consider it safe if installed and used properly.
I don't like the condensation caused by propane cooking especially around here.
Next boat will be diesel, so no need for propane heat.

Electric is drier and eliminates lugging propane tanks around.
Electric is slower.
That's about it, right?

What do you have and would you change if you had to replace existing?
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Old 03-03-2016, 11:20 PM   #2
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Should be (yet) another survey. BTW,you omitted the efficient and safe alcohol fueled cookers.
I don`t see a diesel boat as a reason to reject propane. It`s easy to use without the need to start a genset, quiet, simple, quick.
That said, there are times we use the genset for the kettle, the toaster, the electric roaster/frypan, especially if the genset is already running for another purpose . It`s nice to have options and alternatives.
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Old 03-03-2016, 11:44 PM   #3
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"Australia" we cook everything on the BBQ its even warmish enough in winter to cook out but we do have a 2 burner gas cook top with grill and a portable 240v induction cook top .
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Old 03-03-2016, 11:55 PM   #4
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Much prefer gas in the galley and on land...except for the BBQ....but charcoal and boating don't really mix well, right?
Gas (propane) allows for a lot more heat control than electric. You can cook as well on electric but it does take more attention and fiddling IMHO.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:22 AM   #5
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Propane cooktop and oven, diesel engines and heater, inverter to run slow-cooker crockpot, genny to do frypan, toaster or microwave. We like options too.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:35 AM   #6
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Propane. Don't need the bulk, expense, and maintenance of another engine (genset). Propane is convenient.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:46 AM   #7
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Gas or electric galley?

Propane. Wouldn't consider electric or oil. We used less than one 20 lb tank over 10 weeks.

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Old 03-04-2016, 02:05 AM   #8
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Propane for cooking, diesel for heat, unless tied to the dock then it's electric heat.

Be nice to have a propane fridge but not going to happen for me.

I hated to toss the diesel stove but you had to have it running all the time to cook on it.

I burn a 20 lb tank of propane every 4 to 5 months as a liveaboard, that cooks daily. Steam from cooking can be an issue not so much from the actual propane.
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Old 03-04-2016, 02:52 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OFB;
Steam from cooking can be an issue not so much from the actual propane.
Every pound of propane burned indoors produces 1.5 pints of water that has to go somewhere.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:24 AM   #10
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We have propane stove and oven. Electric refrig, microwave, and other appliances. We also have a gas grill on the boat deck. We carry 2 20lb tanks and those pretty much last all season.

BTW-I also learned my lesson re tank exchange or refill. When tank prices went up to around $20, the companies, especially Blue Rhino, are only filling with 16-17 lbs, rather than 20. My local gas stations, which does refills told that. I did not believe him so I did one last exchange and took the brand new tank to him and he could put 3+ lbs in it.
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Old 03-04-2016, 04:00 AM   #11
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Electric vs propane for the galley depends in part on what you plan to do with the boat. If you are going to live at marinas with only an occasional one night stay at anchor, electric works well. If you are going to be at anchor all the time then everything depends on the genset working. Thus when the genset goes down you are without ability to cook or make coffee.

People differ on how important it is to have a backup or alternative such as a propane stove and a microwave/coffee pot etc. Figure out how you feel about being dependent upon one system.

This occurred to me last weekend. On Saturday afternoon at 2 pm I noticed water in the oil in my genset. I was in an anchorage off of Martinique. The stove still worked, we cooked and ate dinner. Generated enough electricity without the genset to get by, and were lucky to get a mechanic on Monday. Think of how you would handle this with an electric stove. Goes back to how you use the boat, if there will always be a marina nearby, you should be fine without a genset.
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Old 03-04-2016, 06:14 AM   #12
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Both!

Gymboled 4 burner propane range with oven for cooking ,

a Dickinson Pacific range to stay warm all winter when up north.

2 ft of space extra in the galley/salon for year round comfort is no biggy.
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:19 AM   #13
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Think the bigger issue is self evaluation of your cooking needs. Was convinced I wanted a propane stove / cook top when I was shopping for my boat. What I purchased has an electric stove / cook top. No problem, it would be very simple to replace with propane. Started using the boat and found that most of my cooking was either with the microwave or the gas grill. Only thing I've used the oven for is pizza. Haven't even used the cook top yet. Coffee is from an espresso machine. When I make pasta, it's done in the microwave.

I tend to eat simple and let somebody else (restaurant) cook when I want fancy. So I would evaluate your needs before deciding how important a propane stove / oven will be to your boat.

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Old 03-04-2016, 08:23 AM   #14
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Propane cooktop, with an oven the oven is mainly used as a locker, the Cooktop is seldom used, the bulk of the cooking is done on the BBQ pit, a round Magma, microwave, and electric slow cooker. The slow cooker will run off the inverter so can be pugged in, placed in the sink and cook while cruising.
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:30 AM   #15
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Since we use our microwave, ice maker, refrigerator, big TV, electric skillet and electric toilets...it doesn't make sense that our cook top would be propane.
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:42 AM   #16
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We had a full size all-electric kitchen on our Hatt and loved it. We ran the generator in the morning and evening during cooking hours, which also served to charge the batteries, heat the water, do laundry, run the dishwasher, etc. No schlepping propane tanks around to get them refilled.

Ann is an outstanding cook, as I have illustrated in photos here before, and she got used to the glass top range quickly, which had as much heat control as our gas ranges on land have had. Electric makes for a superior oven as well. Keep in mind the boat was our only house for years, the great majority of that time on a mooring, at anchor, or underway. We seldom ate at restaurants. We did have a big gas grill that uses the small pint-sized bottles, which was heavily used as well.
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:53 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwash View Post
Every pound of propane burned indoors produces 1.5 pints of water that has to go somewhere.
Seems high but believable...but I guess I agree with OFB that the steam and just normal personal respiration is going to fog up a boat anyway without air change.

The worst on our 40 footer is the cold mornings and the time for 2 showers right before getting underway. If freezing outside...we aren't likely to crack doors and windows when shower g versus later when cooking.
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:58 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Should be (yet) another survey. BTW,you omitted the efficient and safe alcohol fueled cookers.
From BoatUS Seaworthy magazine .....

The incidence of fires due to stoves has decreased with the gradual replacement of alcohol stoves with propane stoves and electric ranges. Two percent of fires were caused by stoves, more than half resulting from problems with lighting alcohol stoves. Given how few alcohol stoves there are on boats these days, they are significantly more dangerous than those that use other fuel sources. If you still have an alcohol stove on board, you may want to consider upgrading. Most people agree that they don't heat very well, anyway.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:03 AM   #19
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We prefer to go out for meals. Our propane system is mainly decorative.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:04 AM   #20
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Our boat came with genset... Given genset, wouldn't want to deal with propane galley.


Electric galley: cooktop, combo microwave/oven, countertop appliances (toaster, coffeemaker, etc.). No fuss, no muss.


Augmented by a propane grill in the cockpit... when I feel like cleaning up afterwards.


Induction would be faster in the galley, although our ceramic cooktop works fine.


Had alcohol on a previous boat. That sucked.


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