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Old 03-04-2016, 09:07 AM   #21
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Our boat came with genset... Given genset, wouldn't want to deal with propane galley.
I can understand that but I don't want to fire up a generator every time I want a cup of coffee and since I'm up around 0500 my neighbours in the anchorage don't want me to either.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:14 AM   #22
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I can understand that but I don't want to fire up a generator every time I want a cup of coffee and since I'm up around 0500 my neighbours in the anchorage don't want me to either.

Yep, that's the one issue I haven't yet completely solved. My follow-thru is a bit slow.

The easy answer will be an inverter for small loads like the coffeemaker and microwave... and that's in my plan, just haven't done it yet. Wallet problems (not always big enough.)

Does happen we can't really hear our genset when more than about 50' from the boat, though, so we've not had much of an early-morning issue in anchorages. And I'm mostly down to coffee only at breakfast time anyway, these days <sigh>...

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Old 03-04-2016, 09:20 AM   #23
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Electric seems crazy to me.
That's like trying to turn one's boat into a house.
If you have an electric cooking stove your boat is a houseboat.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:27 AM   #24
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Like most people our preference for cooking at home extends to out boat preference as well.

We use electric at home and prefer electric on the boat as well. (Although we do use the grill almost every night as we love BBQ)

All boats are different but our boats design and operation centers around electricity.

We need electricity to run the water maker, the trash smasher, the clothes washer, the satcom and entertainment systems.

And the stove, microwave, even the crock pot uses electricity.

So, for us, with our habits, on our boat an electric galley "fits". I can see where it would not fit on all boats for all people though.

Because of that our generator is an integral and necessary part of the boats operation. We bought the best generator on the market (northern lights). Not because we like spending more for things, because we realized the generators importance to out boating "lifestyle" and opted for the most reliable unit we could find.

We also have a 3,000 watt inverter. This provides power to most of the boats AC systems while away from the dock.

For our lifestyle we want all the comforts of home.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:30 AM   #25
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We need electricity to run the water maker, the trash smasher, the clothes washer, the satcom and entertainment systems.
My wife is my entertainment
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:09 AM   #26
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Although preferring gas cooking at home ... With a gen given I would never decide for propan again (safety, humidity and need the gen anyway to recharge the batteries at anchor).
What is sometimes annoying with this is that we need to run the gen also when cooking in a marina since shore power is fused with too low amps here in Europe.


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Old 03-04-2016, 10:14 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by THD;
...the companies, especially Blue Rhino, are only filling with 16-17 lbs, rather than 20. My local gas stations, which does refills told that. I did not believe him so I did one last exchange and took the brand new tank to him and he could put 3+ lbs in it.
Rhino had it right as they were filling according to the 80% rule which, in many places is mandated.

Most new properly fitted tanks up here, and I suspect most places, have a limiting valve that stops a "20lb" fill at 16bs. FYI, propane expands 17 times more than water for the same temperature rise.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:23 AM   #28
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I like to cook. I live aboard and even though I'm single I cook multiple times per week. I currently have a Force10 3 burner propane stove with oven on my boat. The stove top cooks fine - but is "boat sized" - meaning that I rapidly run out of space if I want two or more large pans on the go at once. The oven is small and is fine for roasting (I can just fit a 12lb turkey in there) but too uneven for good baking.

I've remodeled two kitchens in my two previous dirt homes. In both cases we opted for gas cook top and electric convection oven. When I do my galley remodel I plan to install a full sized, 4 burner gas cook top and an electric convection oven. I've measured up and there's room for that combination in my galley without sacrificing significant storage or counter space. At the same time I will replace the twin sinks with a larger single sink that will fit full sized pots and dishes.

Since I already have propane on the boat this plan makes a lot of sense. I like being able to make breakfast at anchor without running a generator. It's a peaceful time that I don't want to be interrupted by the noise. I have enough battery capacity that I can typically go for a two day, one night weekend without having to fire up a generator. I don't use the oven as often, and will most likely be at the dock, or fine with using a generator at that time.

As for propane causing condensation - I don't find that at all on my boat. Any condensation I see is related to boiling water not the propane.

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Old 03-04-2016, 10:28 AM   #29
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Quote:
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Every pound of propane burned indoors produces 1.5 pints of water that has to go somewhere.
We've been cooking on propane for the last ~40,000 nm on the Inside passage, and never had any concern with the moisture released. Maybe it's not really all that much - we probably use only 15-20 lb or propane for the whole summer. Would hate to have to fire up a generator to cook or even make coffee at 5AM. (don't have one anyway)

Alcohol, OTOH - we had an Origo alcohol stove for a while on our little C-Dory. Nasty fumes, black on the bottom of pots and pans, spilling while refilling, flames you cannot see, low heat output. Yuck!

Switched the C-Dory from that to a Wallas that ran on kerosene. No mess, and could also provide some cabin heat at anchor, but its ceramic cooktop never provided adequate and well-controlled heat like our current propane cooktop.

At home we removed a quality electric stove and replaced with gas with electric convection oven. We like the instant heat control of the cooktop burners.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:40 AM   #30
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Electric seems crazy to me.
That's like trying to turn one's boat into a house.
If you have an electric cooking stove your boat is a houseboat.
I admit to having the same initial reaction. To be honest, in my case I think it is just a reflexive one. I started out with small sailboats, little more than camping on the water. It takes me me a while to get used to newfangled ideas like heat and pressurized water systems.

I am looking for propane stove and oven and an easily accessible, vertical propane tank. That works great at anchor or at the marina without depending on a genset. I have run out of propane before however, I have yet to run out of diesel.

In the 35-40 ft range, I seem to see more electric galleys in the SE than in the PNW. I think it is because here we don't have to be running a genset for AC anyway.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:46 AM   #31
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Alcohol? Really? That stuff should have been outright banned onboard a long time ago. RCook said it. Dangerous and useless.

Generator failure leaving you without your eggs bennie is a non issue. Propane systems can fail too.

I would choose gas any day for serious cooking on land but I still have the moisture factor that only Wadden has refereed too and I suspect that's because most either never gave it a thought or are boating where it doesn't matter so much. We hear lots of people complain about mould on boats and usually associate it with water penetration. Uh, uh, not always.

BTW if you like neat things this is a good conversation piece: http://vikingcylinders.com/product-category/lifestyle/
Much lighter, easier to handle and you can see the propane level.

Watch out though, a company named "Lite" had bad ones, had a forced recall and became insolvent. Lots of them still around, even now, as the recall was not widely known.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:46 AM   #32
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Is it true ...
One must start a diesel engine driving a generator to have a cup of tea?
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Old 03-04-2016, 11:19 AM   #33
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Electric seems crazy to me.
That's like trying to turn one's boat into a house.
If you have an electric cooking stove your boat is a houseboat.

Bayliner built a lot of boats of different types and sizes but never built any houseboats. I do know of several Gibson houseboats with propane cook stoves, I'll have to let the owners of the propane cookers know they have boats and the owners with electric cookers know they have floating houses. This will confuse them because they all look alike;-)


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Old 03-04-2016, 11:26 AM   #34
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I've been considering buying a pellet grill for my house, to supplement my gas grill. Easy and quick to start up (like gas), but with the flavor of grilling with hardwood. They use electricity to start the pellets on fire and to run a small auger motor to feed pellets to the fire box. Not much flame to deal with and easy to control at lower grilling and smoking temps. Would this be a good option for use on a boat? There is at least one manufacturer (Green Mountain) that makes an AC/DC version that they market as a tailgating grill. It's fairly compact, and might work well on a boat. Thoughts?
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Old 03-04-2016, 12:10 PM   #35
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I can understand that but I don't want to fire up a generator every time I want a cup of coffee and since I'm up around 0500 my neighbours in the anchorage don't want me to either.
Our inverter ran the microwave and coffee maker just fine. Problem solved.

What on earth is the problem with having the modern comforts of home on a boat? I missed the memo on that one. And anyway, our boat was our house.
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Old 03-04-2016, 12:32 PM   #36
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My boat is my house and I like my comforts. Each liveaboard has become more house like in comforts.

Even in survival schools they teach you how to make your situation more comfy.

Sure I can make cowboy coffee on the propane stove...not happending if ghe drip coffer maker can be powered one of 5 different ways.. I used to lug 50 pounds of ice to my sailboat every week just to keep beer and wine cold when young and single...nope...no iceboxes on my boat these days.

I understand boaters that like it from one level above primitive camping all the way up to superyacht....but I am not so naive that it should not be done one way or another.
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Old 03-04-2016, 12:32 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Electric seems crazy to me.
That's like trying to turn one's boat into a house.
If you have an electric cooking stove your boat is a houseboat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Is it true ...
One must start a diesel engine driving a generator to have a cup of tea?


OK, guess I have a houseboat. Our avatar proves it.



I suspect your first statement is an example of "for me" (you) and I'd deduce that means you also don't have a generator, don't have AC, don't have hot water, etc. Doesn't seem like that's a problem -- for you.

But it wouldn't be all that great in our life. We might as well drop back to paddling our canoe... which is good exercise, but not at all the same thing we enjoy now with "the houseboat."

And an inverter would work fine for a cup o' tea. Or popcorn.

But then you'd likely not have the electric appliances on board to take advantage of an inverter, yes? And maybe not a large enough battery bank in the first place? Just guessing...

Anyway, different strokes...

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Old 03-04-2016, 12:48 PM   #38
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Is it true ...
One must start a diesel engine driving a generator to have a cup of tea?

Definitely not. The inverter is strong enough to cook water with power from the batteries.


best regards / med venlig hilsen
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Old 03-04-2016, 12:48 PM   #39
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Propane stove. We wouldn't switch to electric. Too used to it.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:58 PM   #40
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All electric except for gas grill(uses the 1lb bottle). Inverter runs microwave and coffee maker. I cook with gas at home but I can get by with the one burner stove top or electric skillet while aboard.
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