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Old 02-13-2016, 10:08 PM   #1
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fresh water capacity

Hi everyone, first post so bare with me. My wife and i own a 1979 Mainship T . We only have a 50 gallon fresh water tank. I would like to add 60 to 80 more gallons of capacity. Plan on living on boat for 6 to 8 weeks this summer, mostly on the hook.Any idea,s? Also, want to thank Brooksie for your help and time.
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Old 02-13-2016, 11:09 PM   #2
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With just a little conservation you may find the water capacity is sufficient but the holding tank capacity is what will limit you.
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Old 02-13-2016, 11:19 PM   #3
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We have 200 gallons of fresh water and 100 black water. That's plenty for our use.
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Old 02-13-2016, 11:19 PM   #4
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I think a minimum 100 gallon storage would be nice. But for 6 to 8 weeks on the hook you must be prepared to transport Water.
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Old 02-13-2016, 11:50 PM   #5
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You mentioned living on it 6 to 8 weeks this summer. Will you be in an area where there are marinas? Replenishing your water regularly is always an option if so.

A second option is to carry a bladder of water. A 50 gallon bladder is available in the $150 range.

Now, then I ask the question about future cruising. If you intend to spend a lot of time regularly away from marinas then a watermaker is worth considering. Obviously that is a more expensive option.
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Old 02-14-2016, 12:08 AM   #6
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I have 80 gallons and it lasts about two weeks if I am on board alone, four days with two women on board with me. Dishes, showers every third day. I never pass on a chance to put more water on board... My toilet is salt water so it doesn't figure into water consumption.
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Old 02-14-2016, 12:10 AM   #7
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My wife and I use about 30 gallons per day when water is plentiful and readily available. But we could easily cut that in half to conserve. This gives is a reason to find a marina. We usually anchor as much as we can. With a 250 gallon water tank, we can stay out awhile. You may find a bigger tank to your advantage as well.
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Old 02-14-2016, 12:22 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swboater View Post
Hi everyone, first post so bare with me. My wife and i own a 1979 Mainship T . We only have a 50 gallon fresh water tank. I would like to add 60 to 80 more gallons of capacity. Plan on living on boat for 6 to 8 weeks this summer, mostly on the hook.Any idea,s? Also, want to thank Brooksie for your help and time.
Have you thought about where you can put another 500 pounds, dead weight, in a 34 foot boat?

Are you also planning to have 6 to 8 weeks food aboard as well?

Are you trying to justify a bigger boat?
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Old 02-14-2016, 12:42 AM   #9
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Apparently most of you are not in a NDZ.
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Old 02-14-2016, 12:49 AM   #10
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Apparently most of you are not in a NDZ.
No, just he didn't ask about holding tank capacity nor did he give us a size. His question was just about water capacity.
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Old 02-14-2016, 06:50 AM   #11
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Easiest is to work a deal with a marina.

You will need a spot to park your car , dump the trash , get mail and obtain water, do the laundry and dump the poop so renting a slip for your dink, in usually cheap shallow water will work.

Marinas get unfriendly when the think you are sneaking in at midnight .
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Old 02-14-2016, 07:52 AM   #12
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Easiest is to work a deal with a marina.

You will need a spot to park your car , dump the trash , get mail and obtain water, do the laundry and dump the poop so renting a slip for your dink, in usually cheap shallow water will work.

Marinas get unfriendly when the think you are sneaking in at midnight .
Agree...

We don't anchor for extended periods...but when we do it seems we run out of space for garbage before water & holding tank capacity.
Are we the only ones?
How do others handle it?
Or is it just easier to dump ashore w dink vs carrying water back?
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:00 AM   #13
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On out 33ft 90/90 we have a Grumman aluminum dink in davits.

It holds a lot of garbage bags!

Stop for the usual, 20G of fuel, 200G of fresh water and get rid of all the bags , before going out on the hook.
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:05 AM   #14
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I would start with 10 potable water containers of 5 gallons each. Finding the space below deck on your boat to install additional tanks would be tough. Then there is the issue of how the additional weight would effect your trim. Having 5 gallon portable containers allows you to carry a few on dinghy rides that may bring you near a water source. As you empty them, they become easy to stow out of the way below deck.

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Old 02-14-2016, 08:19 AM   #15
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In that Mainship you can easily add a 20 or 25 gallon tank on each side on the lazarette outboard of the stringers next to the current tank. Connect them all at the bottom and you have added 40 or 50 gallons.
Each additional tank will
Have to be vented of course.
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:29 AM   #16
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In that Mainship you can easily add a 20 or 25 gallon tank on each side on the lazarette outboard of the stringers next to the current tank. Connect them all at the bottom and you have added 40 or 50 gallons.
Each additional tank will
Have to be vented of course.
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:35 AM   #17
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Six to eight weeks away from a dock? Time for a water maker
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:42 AM   #18
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When we had the our 34 Mainship we always carried 2-6 gallon water jugs. When ever we went to shore to dump trash, go shopping or just for a walk we filled them up. If we got behind, we'd make a couple of runs to fill the boat's water tank.

You could also carry 1/2 dozen clean empty white 5 gallon buckets with lids. They stack so they store easy when empty. Make a water run and add 30 gallons to the on-board tank.

50 gallons of on board capacity could last you 5 days with some conservation.
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Old 02-14-2016, 09:11 AM   #19
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We have a 36' Mainship DC (Aft Cabin) with 100 Gal of fresh water.
We are full time live-aboards and cruisers.
Between the both of us including fresh water flush of the heads, at the dock, we use up the 100 gals in about 4 days.
When on the hook, it will last about a week. That is partly due to eating off paper plates to help conserve wash water. Generally when traveling, we never need to go the full week because we will hit a marina at least every 3 days or so. At marinas, we mostly shower in their showers. While travelling, its a combination of whores baths and I use a 2 gal bug sprayer. One gal hot water and soap up and one gal. to rinse. That's the best way I know of to meter your bath water usage.
Hope this info helps. Again, we have 100 gal capacity. From there, you can do the math for what you have or plan on getting.
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Old 02-14-2016, 09:18 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
I would start with 10 potable water containers of 5 gallons each. Finding the space below deck on your boat to install additional tanks would be tough. Then there is the issue of how the additional weight would effect your trim. Having 5 gallon portable containers allows you to carry a few on dinghy rides that may bring you near a water source. As you empty them, they become easy to stow out of the way below deck.

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When we had the our 34 Mainship we always carried 2-6 gallon water jugs.

You could also carry 1/2 dozen clean empty white 5 gallon buckets with lids. They stack so they store easy when empty.

Seems like an easy try-it-and-see approach, before attempting a real refit.

OTOH, if it were on our boat, with the fill on a side deck... we'd have a heck of a time transferring water from those to the on-board tanks for subsequent distribution throughout the boat. Maybe have to rig up a "pour hose" fitting or some such in one of the lids...

I like the stackable idea. We keep a few Rubbermaid water cans at the house, full, in case of long-term power outage... and while they're purpose built and offer a pour spout... they take up some space, no matter whether full or empty.

-Chris
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