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Old 03-13-2016, 01:30 PM   #21
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In a boat of the size OP is considering, is it unreasonable to expect that the generator will not make any noticeable noise? On my boat, only a little bigger, the generator is not heard unless one specifically listens for it, and even then the reaction is inevitably "boy that is quiet".
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Old 03-13-2016, 01:44 PM   #22
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In a boat of the size OP is considering, is it unreasonable to expect that the generator will not make any noticeable noise? On my boat, only a little bigger, the generator is not heard unless one specifically listens for it, and even then the reaction is inevitably "boy that is quiet".
It's only reasonable if the genset is newer, is properly mounted and has a good hush cover.
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Old 03-13-2016, 02:06 PM   #23
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Reiterating a couple of points others have made.

Size of flybridge is important. Not one of the stuck on just to have an upper helm types but a full bridge that can accommodate people well and feel large. Second, we insist of full helms, upper and lower. Neither can be a secondary or lesser helm. All the same equipment and comfort of navigation and operation. We strongly disagree with the SF popular notion that with the upper helm you don't need the lower. We also find that if your upper helm isn't complete then you won't go up there as much underway. It should be very seamless going back and forth.
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Old 03-13-2016, 03:15 PM   #24
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Reiterating a couple of points others have made.

Size of flybridge is important. Not one of the stuck on just to have an upper helm types but a full bridge that can accommodate people well and feel large. Second, we insist of full helms, upper and lower. Neither can be a secondary or lesser helm. All the same equipment and comfort of navigation and operation. We strongly disagree with the SF popular notion that with the upper helm you don't need the lower. We also find that if your upper helm isn't complete then you won't go up there as much underway. It should be very seamless going back and forth.
Very good point. Our upper helm had all the controls and electronics and gauges and alarms as the lower one. Plus three helm seats vs a bench seat for two at the lower helm. And a good stereo. And an even nicer view! Loved it up there.
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Old 03-13-2016, 04:53 PM   #25
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Have little use for a flying bridge, and don't miss climbing ladders or stairs to go up and get down, nor the exposure to sun and skin-drying breeze, or even the exaggerated motion. It's not unusual to operate with my boat buttoned up, and often two open pilothouse doors provide too much breeze inside the boat.

Safer inside:



It's a matter of personal preference and availability. There are good reasons for both having and not having a flying bridge.
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Old 03-13-2016, 07:48 PM   #26
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Have little use for a flying bridge, and don't miss climbing ladders or stairs to go up and get down, nor the exposure to sun and skin-drying breeze, or even the exaggerated motion. It's not unusual to operate with my boat buttoned up, and often two open pilothouse doors provide too much breeze inside the boat.

Safer inside:



It's a matter of personal preference and availability. There are good reasons for both having and not having a flying bridge.
The view from a flying bridge is so much nicer in the Delta sloughs and San Joaquin, Sacramento and the Napa River.
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Old 03-13-2016, 08:06 PM   #27
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Views from the pilothouse (here on the Napa River) are great. (About once a year find the openable front pilothouse window brings a welcoming breeze.)

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Old 03-14-2016, 06:14 AM   #28
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Keep looking, many Nordhavn 50s have flybridges.

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1997...s#.VuagxJwrK70
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Old 03-14-2016, 12:47 PM   #29
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Keep looking, many Nordhavn 50s have flybridges.

1997 Nordhavn 50 Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
Yes it does. We are thinking about it but have three concerns:

1) Electric stove/cooktop - wife says she absolutely must have gas cooking. I imagine we could put in a Force 10 for about $3,000 with parts and labor.

2) No watermaker - we can live with this 'cause I've installed watermakers in other boats but it is something to deal with and spend $8,000 or so on.

3) It is in Rhode Island (a small state in a part of the nation I was only vaguely aware of) and is about as far from San Diego and our desired Sea of Cortez cruising area as possible

Seriously - we could easily sell our current boat in San Diego and then start our cruise in Rhode Island during early summer and then end up in Florida after Thanksgiving. And, avoid those pesky Panama Canal fees, California Use/Sales and Income Tax.

But, I don't know if we want to deal with a cross county boat purchase when there is a beautiful Selene 53 for sale just a few miles up the coast. It is 5-years newer and has 1,000 fewer engine hours.

We are so confused with too many very nice options!
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