Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-23-2012, 11:02 AM   #41
Guru
 
bobofthenorth's Avatar
 
City: Cowichan Bay, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gray Hawk
Vessel Model: Defever 43 Offshore Cruiser
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 570
Never use ours. Wouldn't miss it if it wasn't there except for the cat. He likes to lie on the canvas on a sunny day. (yep, most days we leave the cover on)
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
R.J.(Bob) Evans
www.rjevans.org
www.travellingwithgeorge.blogspot.com
bobofthenorth is offline  
Old 10-23-2012, 11:10 AM   #42
Guru
 
alormaria's Avatar
 
City: Trenton
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 901
When we on a cruise and actually going somewhere I use the lower station. Also locking is much easier from that station. Most docking in slips and local goofing around is done from the FB. It is a really nice place to have drinks at sunset.
__________________

__________________
Al Johnson
34' Marine Trader
"Angelina"
alormaria is offline  
Old 10-23-2012, 12:27 PM   #43
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
A lot would depend on the model of the boat and the areas climate/weather Having a pilot house a fly bridge is no necessary. Our auto pilot has a 25 ft wire remote so I am not suck at the helm or pilot house. The only limitation I have found is stern tie docking. However, as mentioned with a pilot house you are closure and can feel/hear the engine room what is happening inside the boat, and closer to the dock.

As for sitting enjoying the evening we have the enclosed stern deck and our the roof of the salon. Besides a fly is another maintenance area which we would probable not use much in the PNW. If we had a fly it would be fully enclosed. So a lot depends on the layout, where the helm is located and the area climate.
Phil Fill is offline  
Old 10-23-2012, 02:05 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
Rusty's Avatar
 
City: WA
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 214
We use our flybridge as often as possible. I prefer it when maneuvering in marinas and the locks. I like being outside. In calm seas, I am up there most all the time. Our flybridge is not enclosed. Summer evenings are usually spent on the flybridge as well.

Rusty is offline  
Old 10-23-2012, 02:12 PM   #45
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
The flying bridge is a great place to sit once we get somewhere. The barbecue is mounted up there (it's the only place on the boat with stainless handrails you can mount stuff on). And the guests we take on the boat from time to time like riding up there if the weather is decent. So I'm glad we have it. But we would never drive the boat (or any boat) from up there for the reasons I've stated.
Marin is offline  
Old 10-23-2012, 08:01 PM   #46
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,853
I hardly notice the difference on many trips....once autopilot is on...I'm up, down, all around....only steer when absolutely necessary due to traffic or confined waters.
psneeld is offline  
Old 10-23-2012, 08:38 PM   #47
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,847
Oh yeah, the visibility thing.



__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 01:06 AM   #48
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,979
Don - You have parallel vista visit-ability... Picts from nearly any FB is fresh aired higher elevation visibility!


Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Art - Pilot Tolly_100_1362.JPG
Views:	65
Size:	54.3 KB
ID:	13678   Click image for larger version

Name:	Art & Linda on TO - Maltese Falcon SF Bay Entry Spring 2009_100_1391.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	107.9 KB
ID:	13679  
Art is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 01:12 AM   #49
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,248
Great! Let's all keep our distance.

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 01:59 AM   #50
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Okay, here is a totally unscientific observation based on our own encounters with other boaters.

In every case I can recall where another boater did something stupid or unsafe---- passing us close aboard on a plowing plane with a giant wake, not giving way when they should, blasting at maximum plow through groups of fishermen in open boats, totally screwing up a docking in a marina to the point where (in one case at Friday Harbor) another boater actually boarded their boat and took over the helm, and a myriad of other inconsiderate or ignorant incidents---- in every case I can recall the boat was being driven from the flying bridge with it's "unlimited" visibility. In some cases I can recall the fellow at the helm had his head totally buried in his electronics (I assume) and never once looked up as he plowed past nearby boats.

But....... virtually every powerboater I know personally who is competent, courteous, knowledgeable, considerate, aware of the Colregs, and experienced drives from the lower helm or a pilothouse if their boat has one.

As I said, totally unscientific and based only on our observation and experience in these waters. But to us (and to a number of our friends, power and sail) a guy sitting stolidly on his flying bridge oblivious of everything around him is the poster image of a bad boater.

I have no scientific or psychological explanation for this. It's simply been our observation in all the years we've been fishing and cruising these waters. Your observations may vary.

The absolute classic occurred back in the early 1990s. We were fishing in our Arima off the east side of Whidbey Island. The channel between Whidbey and the mainland at Mukilteo is about a mile and a half wide. Suddenly, or so it seemed, the entire channel was full of Orcas. Apparently the two summer resident pods, perhaps even three, had joined up and were headed slowly north through the channel. There were Orcas everywhere from shore to shore and they put on quite a show. We were about mid-channel and we stopped to watch, as did virtually every other boat in the area from small open fishing boats to passing sailboats and cruisers. A few of the Orcas came right alongside our boat, even stopping and half-rolling to look at us.

And then from the south tip of Whidbey at Possession Point here comes some sort of big cruiser. I'm not going to say it was a Bayliner because I don't remember. But it was that type of boat. Probably 45 feet long or so. Plowing along putting out an enormous wake. The skipper was seated at the flying bridge helm looking straight ahead. And he headed directly through the multiple pods of Orcas and the boats.

Now the Orcas were in no danger--- they have no problem avoiding boats. But a lot of boaters yelled at this guy as he plowed through in an unwavering line. Some of them were pointing out the Orcas as in, "Hey, look at the neat whales!" Others were screaming at him to slow down because of his wake. And the radio lit up like a Roman candle with cursing.

And this guy looked neither right nor left nor did he change his speed or course one iota. He was driving the boat himself--- we could see his hands on the wheel. He passed close enough to us that we could hear the radio on his flying bridge broadcasting the cursing and requests to slow down. And he was totally oblivious.

Now, was his behavior somehow linked to the fact he drove his boat from the flying bridge? I dunno. He was probably an ******* in his car, too. But that is the image we have carried ever since of "flybridge drivers." And it's surprising how often that image has been reinforced over the years.

So Mark, you stick to your pilothouse boat. You're in good company.
Marin is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 02:16 AM   #51
Guru
 
Edelweiss's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1976 Californian Tricabin LRC
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,834
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeSailor View Post
With trawler speeds, there's simply nothing better for us than sitting up in the open air and enjoying the salt air. We have a Europa, so there's LOTS of room up there to stretch out.

My wife is a triathlete and even rides her bike up there. (on the trainer)
---------------------------------------------

She rides the stationary bike while underway?? I wonder how many people see her pedaling away and think she is driving the boat??

I will be watching for you!!

LB
Edelweiss is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 02:17 AM   #52
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
... So Mark, you stick to your pilothouse boat. You're in good company.
Will do!

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 09:54 AM   #53
Senior Member
 
Slowboat 37's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Okay, here is a totally unscientific observation based on our own encounters with other boaters.

In every case I can recall where another boater did something stupid or unsafe---- passing us close aboard on a plowing plane with a giant wake, not giving way when they should, blasting at maximum plow through groups of fishermen in open boats, totally screwing up a docking in a marina to the point where (in one case at Friday Harbor) another boater actually boarded their boat and took over the helm, and a myriad of other inconsiderate or ignorant incidents---- in every case I can recall the boat was being driven from the flying bridge with it's "unlimited" visibility. In some cases I can recall the fellow at the helm had his head totally buried in his electronics (I assume) and never once looked up as he plowed past nearby boats.

But....... virtually every powerboater I know personally who is competent, courteous, knowledgeable, considerate, aware of the Colregs, and experienced drives from the lower helm or a pilothouse if their boat has one.

As I said, totally unscientific and based only on our observation and experience in these waters. But to us (and to a number of our friends, power and sail) a guy sitting stolidly on his flying bridge oblivious of everything around him is the poster image of a bad boater.

I have no scientific or psychological explanation for this. It's simply been our observation in all the years we've been fishing and cruising these waters. Your observations may vary.

The absolute classic occurred back in the early 1990s. We were fishing in our Arima off the east side of Whidbey Island. The channel between Whidbey and the mainland at Mukilteo is about a mile and a half wide. Suddenly, or so it seemed, the entire channel was full of Orcas. Apparently the two summer resident pods, perhaps even three, had joined up and were headed slowly north through the channel. There were Orcas everywhere from shore to shore and they put on quite a show. We were about mid-channel and we stopped to watch, as did virtually every other boat in the area from small open fishing boats to passing sailboats and cruisers. A few of the Orcas came right alongside our boat, even stopping and half-rolling to look at us.

And then from the south tip of Whidbey at Possession Point here comes some sort of big cruiser. I'm not going to say it was a Bayliner because I don't remember. But it was that type of boat. Probably 45 feet long or so. Plowing along putting out an enormous wake. The skipper was seated at the flying bridge helm looking straight ahead. And he headed directly through the multiple pods of Orcas and the boats.

Now the Orcas were in no danger--- they have no problem avoiding boats. But a lot of boaters yelled at this guy as he plowed through in an unwavering line. Some of them were pointing out the Orcas as in, "Hey, look at the neat whales!" Others were screaming at him to slow down because of his wake. And the radio lit up like a Roman candle with cursing.

And this guy looked neither right nor left nor did he change his speed or course one iota. He was driving the boat himself--- we could see his hands on the wheel. He passed close enough to us that we could hear the radio on his flying bridge broadcasting the cursing and requests to slow down. And he was totally oblivious.

Now, was his behavior somehow linked to the fact he drove his boat from the flying bridge? I dunno. He was probably an ******* in his car, too. But that is the image we have carried ever since of "flybridge drivers." And it's surprising how often that image has been reinforced over the years.

So Mark, you stick to your pilothouse boat. You're in good company.
Having driven the ( Big Rigs) all over the country in all kinds of weather there is no doubt in my mind that an elevated vantage point gives better all around visibility. No matter where you drive from you should be aware of your surroundings. Please don't lump me in inconsiderate and selfish drivers.
__________________
Steve Pryor
1979 Hershine 37
Lilli Belle
The Great North West
Slowboat 37 is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 10:11 AM   #54
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slowboat 37 View Post
Having driven the ( Big Rigs) all over the country in all kinds of weather there is no doubt in my mind that an elevated vantage point gives better all around visibility. No matter where you drive from you should be aware of your surroundings. Please don't lump me in inconsiderate and selfish drivers.
Steve, I don't believe anyone is lumping you in with the inconsiderate group. I have had 2 flybridge boats. My Black Fin had a tower that I have replaced with a T top. Elevated site lines are a good thing. As we age things change a little. Climbing ladders is not as much fun. The exaggerated motion in a seaway is a consideration, and the sun takes a toll on the skin. Our last two boats have been hard top express cruisers that could be opened or enclosed with climate controls. Everyone is within sight on the same level, and it is quite comfortable. I miss the flybridge in the Bahamas, but on balance I am happy with what we have. Oh yeah, I have seen express cruisers being some of the worst offenders in the discourteous department.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 11:06 AM   #55
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Okay, here is a totally unscientific observation based on our own encounters with other boaters.

In every case I can recall where another boater did something stupid or unsafe---- passing us close aboard on a plowing plane with a giant wake, not giving way when they should, blasting at maximum plow through groups of fishermen in open boats, totally screwing up a docking in a marina to the point where (in one case at Friday Harbor) another boater actually boarded their boat and took over the helm, and a myriad of other inconsiderate or ignorant incidents---- in every case I can recall the boat was being driven from the flying bridge with it's "unlimited" visibility. In some cases I can recall the fellow at the helm had his head totally buried in his electronics (I assume) and never once looked up as he plowed past nearby boats.

But....... virtually every powerboater I know personally who is competent, courteous, knowledgeable, considerate, aware of the Colregs, and experienced drives from the lower helm or a pilothouse if their boat has one.

As I said, totally unscientific and based only on our observation and experience in these waters. But to us (and to a number of our friends, power and sail) a guy sitting stolidly on his flying bridge oblivious of everything around him is the poster image of a bad boater.

I have no scientific or psychological explanation for this. It's simply been our observation in all the years we've been fishing and cruising these waters. Your observations may vary.

The absolute classic occurred back in the early 1990s. We were fishing in our Arima off the east side of Whidbey Island. The channel between Whidbey and the mainland at Mukilteo is about a mile and a half wide. Suddenly, or so it seemed, the entire channel was full of Orcas. Apparently the two summer resident pods, perhaps even three, had joined up and were headed slowly north through the channel. There were Orcas everywhere from shore to shore and they put on quite a show. We were about mid-channel and we stopped to watch, as did virtually every other boat in the area from small open fishing boats to passing sailboats and cruisers. A few of the Orcas came right alongside our boat, even stopping and half-rolling to look at us.

And then from the south tip of Whidbey at Possession Point here comes some sort of big cruiser. I'm not going to say it was a Bayliner because I don't remember. But it was that type of boat. Probably 45 feet long or so. Plowing along putting out an enormous wake. The skipper was seated at the flying bridge helm looking straight ahead. And he headed directly through the multiple pods of Orcas and the boats.

Now the Orcas were in no danger--- they have no problem avoiding boats. But a lot of boaters yelled at this guy as he plowed through in an unwavering line. Some of them were pointing out the Orcas as in, "Hey, look at the neat whales!" Others were screaming at him to slow down because of his wake. And the radio lit up like a Roman candle with cursing.

And this guy looked neither right nor left nor did he change his speed or course one iota. He was driving the boat himself--- we could see his hands on the wheel. He passed close enough to us that we could hear the radio on his flying bridge broadcasting the cursing and requests to slow down. And he was totally oblivious.

Now, was his behavior somehow linked to the fact he drove his boat from the flying bridge? I dunno. He was probably an ******* in his car, too. But that is the image we have carried ever since of "flybridge drivers." And it's surprising how often that image has been reinforced over the years.

So Mark, you stick to your pilothouse boat. You're in good company.
Marin, a few of my inputs re your statements... your quotes provided!

Maybe Hugh Heffner's center-of-mag (not electronics) had something to do with your following quote! - LOL “In some cases I can recall the fellow at the helm had his head totally buried in his electronics (I assume) and never once looked up as he plowed past nearby boats."

You bet cha! - "Your observations may vary."

I bet you and wife, as well as others on so equipped boats, may well have gone onto the bridge to look down at the Orca and get a best view! - "A few of the Orcas came right alongside our boat, even stopping and half-rolling to look at us."

Drinking and driving never mix!! LOL - "Now, was his behavior somehow linked to the fact he drove his boat from the flying bridge? I dunno. He was probably an ******* in his car, too."

Marin - The feelings we gain from life experiences are sure a hoot in regard to the "color" they place upon our considered opinions. That said: Early 60's (I was bout 12 yrs), on the South Shore of LI, NY, the best (worst) pleasure boat accident I ever watched as it actually occurred was a 40 + foot wooden Owens hitting a major a bridge abutment bow on at some 14 +/- knots. That cruiser's bow splintered like a match stick and shortened some 8 feet or more. With jaws dropped we watched her as she hit. Some injuries... and, pilot was stone drunk! Pop pulled alongside to assist best as possible. CG and police were soon there. Boat didn't immediately sink although it did nose down deeper into the water - that was amazing in itself cause the bow stem was totaled with a gaping hole into the hull. Must have had a sealed internal, vertical bulwark before amidships. Back then, on East Coast, Owens was referred to as Bayliner too often are now in the NWP. Anyway... that accident happened from salon piloting and I recall many cruisers on conjested LI channels being badly/inconsiderately operated from salon helms. BUT - That does not make me think that lower pilot station operators are all bad. It's the pilot that rules the roost, not the position of piloting that makes a Captain perform incorrectly!

PS: I've seen A-Hole pilots on the bridge too!!
Art is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 01:39 PM   #56
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Okay, here is a totally unscientific observation based on our own encounters with other boaters.

In every case I can recall where another boater did something stupid or unsafe---- passing us close aboard on a plowing plane with a giant wake, not giving way when they should, blasting at maximum plow through groups of fishermen in open boats, totally screwing up a docking in a marina to the point where (in one case at Friday Harbor) another boater actually boarded their boat and took over the helm, and a myriad of other inconsiderate or ignorant incidents---- in every case I can recall the boat was being driven from the flying bridge with it's "unlimited" visibility. In some cases I can recall the fellow at the helm had his head totally buried in his electronics (I assume) and never once looked up as he plowed past nearby boats.

But....... virtually every powerboater I know personally who is competent, courteous, knowledgeable, considerate, aware of the Colregs, and experienced drives from the lower helm or a pilothouse if their boat has one. ..............
That's about as unscientific as it gets. It's just another of the many "if you don't do it the way I do it, you're incompetent, a novice, etc." posts that are so common on this forum.

I hope somewhere deep inside, you are smarter than that.
rwidman is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 02:18 PM   #57
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Okay, here is a totally unscientific observation based on our own encounters with other boaters.

In every case I can recall where another boater did something stupid or unsafe---- passing us close aboard on a plowing plane with a giant wake, not giving way when they should, blasting at maximum plow through groups of fishermen in open boats, totally screwing up a docking in a marina to the point where (in one case at Friday Harbor) another boater actually boarded their boat and took over the helm, and a myriad of other inconsiderate or ignorant incidents---- in every case I can recall the boat was being driven from the flying bridge with it's "unlimited" visibility. In some cases I can recall the fellow at the helm had his head totally buried in his electronics (I assume) and never once looked up as he plowed past nearby boats.

But....... virtually every powerboater I know personally who is competent, courteous, knowledgeable, considerate, aware of the Colregs, and experienced drives from the lower helm or a pilothouse if their boat has one.

As I said, totally unscientific and based only on our observation and experience in these waters. But to us (and to a number of our friends, power and sail) a guy sitting stolidly on his flying bridge oblivious of everything around him is the poster image of a bad boater.

I have no scientific or psychological explanation for this. It's simply been our observation in all the years we've been fishing and cruising these waters. Your observations may vary.

The absolute classic occurred back in the early 1990s. We were fishing in our Arima off the east side of Whidbey Island. The channel between Whidbey and the mainland at Mukilteo is about a mile and a half wide. Suddenly, or so it seemed, the entire channel was full of Orcas. Apparently the two summer resident pods, perhaps even three, had joined up and were headed slowly north through the channel. There were Orcas everywhere from shore to shore and they put on quite a show. We were about mid-channel and we stopped to watch, as did virtually every other boat in the area from small open fishing boats to passing sailboats and cruisers. A few of the Orcas came right alongside our boat, even stopping and half-rolling to look at us.

And then from the south tip of Whidbey at Possession Point here comes some sort of big cruiser. I'm not going to say it was a Bayliner because I don't remember. But it was that type of boat. Probably 45 feet long or so. Plowing along putting out an enormous wake. The skipper was seated at the flying bridge helm looking straight ahead. And he headed directly through the multiple pods of Orcas and the boats.

Now the Orcas were in no danger--- they have no problem avoiding boats. But a lot of boaters yelled at this guy as he plowed through in an unwavering line. Some of them were pointing out the Orcas as in, "Hey, look at the neat whales!" Others were screaming at him to slow down because of his wake. And the radio lit up like a Roman candle with cursing.

And this guy looked neither right nor left nor did he change his speed or course one iota. He was driving the boat himself--- we could see his hands on the wheel. He passed close enough to us that we could hear the radio on his flying bridge broadcasting the cursing and requests to slow down. And he was totally oblivious.

Now, was his behavior somehow linked to the fact he drove his boat from the flying bridge? I dunno. He was probably an ******* in his car, too. But that is the image we have carried ever since of "flybridge drivers." And it's surprising how often that image has been reinforced over the years.

So Mark, you stick to your pilothouse boat. You're in good company.
Marin, all I can say about your statement above is it a classic example of finding exactly what you are looking for. While I don't have but a few years cruising in the PNW, I have skippered and owned many boats, and have extensive experience offshore of California and Mexico, as well as many years cruising the Hawaiian Islands, along with some fishing and cruising in Thailand, the Philippines, and Australia (Navy and non-Navy). Your statements above can and do apply to any type of boater anywhere in the world- how arrogant of you to insinuate that your narrow minded sightlines as the preferred (only) way to pilot a vessel.

Yes, my observations and experiences have been vastly different from yours. I've seen courtesy from skippers driving from above, and rabid arrogance from a skipper (drive from his lower helm) hell-bent on getting into the locks and cutting all off. I've seen the best and the worst.- and don't judge any.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
That's about as unscientific as it gets. It's just another of the many "if you don't do it the way I do it, you're incompetent, a novice, etc." posts that are so common on this forum.

I hope somewhere deep inside, you are smarter than that.
Indeed.
__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 03:28 PM   #58
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
I had some dead time after editing last night because my work PC was migrating to Windows 7, which at Boeing is an on-line, three-day, six-to-eight hours each day automated process during which you can't use the computer and I had to wait for it to finish before I could go home (at 2:00am). Why Boeing didn't take a page from one of its best customers--- Southwest Airlines--- and standardize the whole company (other than the engineers) on Mac I'll never know. We started with Macs way back when and then some fool decided to switch the company to PCs and Windows. Probably got a big kickback from Dell or something....

Anyway all the discussion about flying bridges and their advantages and disadvantages prompted me to write what I wrote. While I'm pretty sure (but not totally positive) that there is no real connection between a flying bridge and bad boating, the stuff I related is all true. We tend to judge the things around us by what we see and experience, so the image we have of an oblivious lug sitting up there plowing his way along regardless of the rest of the world is one we will have forever.

Actually what I've found to be most fascinating is (1) how many people took it all so seriously and (2) how the responses matched the forum character of the responders so perfectly.

And Art, given the choice of being up on a flying bridge and looking down on the Orcas or being at water level when they come up next to you three or four feet away and look you in the eye, I'll take the water-level experience every time.
Marin is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 03:50 PM   #59
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
............ We tend to judge the things around us by what we see and experience, so the image we have of an oblivious lug sitting up there plowing his way along regardless of the rest of the world is one we will have forever.

Actually what I've found to be most fascinating is (1) how many people took it all so seriously and (2) how the responses matched the forum character of the responders so perfectly............
You just can't admit that it was a bad post, can you? Yes, my response matched my character because I don't like BS and I call it when I see it. Your post deserved the response it got.

As for judging things by what we see, every night on TV I see pictures of black males who have been charged with crimes. Based on what I see, I might assume that all black males are criminals. Is that the conclusion you would draw?
rwidman is offline  
Old 10-24-2012, 04:16 PM   #60
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
I had some dead time after editing last night because my work PC was migrating to Windows 7, which at Boeing is an on-line, three-day, six-to-eight hours each day automated process during which you can't use the computer and I had to wait for it to finish before I could go home (at 2:00am). Why Boeing didn't take a page from one of its best customers--- Southwest Airlines--- and standardize the whole company (other than the engineers) on Mac I'll never know. We started with Macs way back when and then some fool decided to switch the company to PCs and Windows. Probably got a big kickback from Dell or something....

Anyway all the discussion about flying bridges and their advantages and disadvantages prompted me to write what I wrote. While I'm pretty sure (but not totally positive) that there is no real connection between a flying bridge and bad boating, the stuff I related is all true. We tend to judge the things around us by what we see and experience, so the image we have of an oblivious lug sitting up there plowing his way along regardless of the rest of the world is one we will have forever.

Actually what I've found to be most fascinating is (1) how many people took it all so seriously and (2) how the responses matched the forum character of the responders so perfectly.

And Art, given the choice of being up on a flying bridge and looking down on the Orcas or being at water level when they come up next to you three or four feet away and look you in the eye, I'll take the water-level experience every time.
So shall your response be taken as that of a narcissistic, all knowing, unable to have rational conversation (except for the "I talk, you listen" type) type of character?

Forums are supposed to be about sharing of information and ideas- your post was anything but. Add to it some lame-ass excuses about computers, and what I see is a forum member unable to admit he put his foot into his mouth.
__________________

__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline  
Closed Thread

Tags
fly bridge

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012