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Old 10-16-2013, 08:49 PM   #21
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...from another forum...

Re: Anyone Familiar with Great Harbor Trawlers ?
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Just what do you mean by open ocean cruising? I own a GH 47 and submit that even the manufacturer will say that some ocean voyages are possible but basically these are built for coastal water. That said the manufacturer routinely runs his N 47 between the Bahamas, and Savanah offshore. One N 37 did make a voyage to Hawaii, and last year a N 47 went to the BVI's via the DR and Puerto Rico, but other than the one Hawaiian trip the other 20 owners I know use their vessels up and down the east coast, through the Bahamas and the Gulf, and the great Lakes.

As far as the conjecture in the above thread as to the ride let me correct any impressions given by these experts without experience. I have the GH with the greatest windage and the ride is very soft, without any sharp motions at all. This was a concern of mine before purchase and my concern was alleviated by spending a hour or two with the naval architect who designed the boat, and several other owners. I have had little difficulty docking in any condition worthy of venturing out. I have anchored out until wind conditions abated for docking, but I did that with the Grand Banks I owned prior. In fact I would put the Great Harbor ride above that of the Grand Banks because of the hard chines. The GH hard chines and low center of gravity cut the motion by about half.

True there are no low side decks, but the boat deck runs around the entire vessel and who does not use pre rigged lines when approaching a dock? We spend a lot more time in the full width saloon than we do docking. There also is the argument for the twin engines where the boat has excellent manueverability in reverse. We almost always back into slips where we don't get a T head, but we only ask for T heads because we tow a 17' skiff and the T head saves dropping the skiff off at the fuel dock.

Lastly regarding sailing at anchor, these vessels do sail, but having anchored in the same places as our friends with similar designs from DeFever and Krogen, their sailing at anchor is similar as well. The cure for sailing is a second snubber line (we use two, one from an eye on the bow near the waterline, and attach both to the same spot) on the anchor chain led aft to a cleat halfway between midships and the stern and adjusted to keep the wind on one side. The same can be accomplished with a stern anchor deployed with a dink on the upwind side, and don't forget one can always move to leeward anchorage where available as sailors have for years. Actually inside the boat the sailing is hardly noticeable, but it makes for caution when entering the dink.

All boats are a compromise (duh), we chose the GH because of several factors the greatest being the shallow draft (2'11"). We have cruised the Abacos each of the last three years and routinely are able to use passes and anchorages unthinkable to Krogens, Nordhavens, etc.

If you are not going to cross oceans why buy the boat designed for it at probably twice the price? If you are crossing oceans then the Great Harbor is not for you, but not for the misguided reasons in the thread above.
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Old 10-16-2013, 09:37 PM   #22
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Sounds like a lucid, rational evaluation coming from experience on the GH. These GH series do look windy, but the N-series don't. I'd love to hear the same evaluation from an N-series owner. God, to have an engine room like the N-series.
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Old 10-16-2013, 11:58 PM   #23
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I want one...
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Old 10-28-2013, 09:06 AM   #24
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I want one...
Just started looking at them on yachtworld.

They seem like very comfortable boats and the Great Harbours seem to mimic them.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:08 AM   #25
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Perhaps having the words "bay" AND "coaster" in in the name gives folks the idea that it's not an open water boat.

Just saying.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:12 AM   #26
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There's one for sale right down the road from here. It has a hottub on the top deck. Guess you have to drain it each time you get underway?
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:33 AM   #27
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Guess you have to drain it each time you get underway?
Maybe it's "self emptying"?

FWIW, many larger boats have a system to drain the pool into a tank located low in the hull. The water is pumped back when at anchor or alongside. The system saves a lot of treated potable water.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:36 AM   #28
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Maybe it's "self emptying"?

FWIW, many larger boats have a system to drain the pool into a tank located low in the hull. The water is pumped back when at anchor or alongside. The system saves a lot of treated potable water.
Hopefully the wipers on the pilothouse are very effective.

I would like to go see this one.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:49 AM   #29
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There's one for sale right down the road from here. It has a hottub on the top deck. Guess you have to drain it each time you get underway?
Yeah, I've seen that boat. You gotta have a lot of confidence in the strength of your deck to put a hot-tub on it. Calculating the change in CG is pretty scary. When my Admiral and I were entertaining a lot in Miami, I called Krogen to find out how may people I could safely hold on my boat deck. The response was 15 average adults, but they warned me not to leave the dock. If something on one side of the boat caught everyones attention and they all rushed to look, the weight transfer may not capsize the boat, but a few may be in danger of going over the rail.
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Old 10-30-2013, 07:11 AM   #30
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If something on one side of the boat caught everyones attention and they all rushed to look, the weight transfer may not capsize the boat, but a few may be in danger of going over the rail.

The USCG test for Inspected Vessels is 1/2 the freeboard can submerge with the full Pax count lining the rail.

Might be fun to do your own test , a keg should get as many subjects as required.

Getting a realistic weight from the guys is easy , from the gals ????


The test assumes there is no port in the hull side, or it has a metal sealing cover that is required to be closed & sealed underway.
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:45 PM   #31
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Yeah, I've seen that boat. You gotta have a lot of confidence in the strength of your deck to put a hot-tub on it. Calculating the change in CG is pretty scary. When my Admiral and I were entertaining a lot in Miami, I called Krogen to find out how may people I could safely hold on my boat deck. The response was 15 average adults, but they warned me not to leave the dock. If something on one side of the boat caught everyones attention and they all rushed to look, the weight transfer may not capsize the boat, but a few may be in danger of going over the rail.
The admiral would want us to buy this trawler just for the hot tub. She loves them and I've always maintained them.

Isn't that the way it always is?
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