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Old 06-27-2015, 03:49 AM   #21
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All the above aside, I heard of the crash on the radio and immediately thought of some of the people I've read about on here that fly floats in Alaska.
I was hoping that it was not another TF'er.

No stranger to death and destruction here, but and unfortunately Wifey B, some of us do become a bit calloused over the years.
It's a coping mechanism...part of the territory.

My heart goes out to those lost.

RIP...
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Old 06-27-2015, 01:45 PM   #22
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IMHO, accidents, injury and death should not cause us to stop doing the things we all enjoy. However, we should all review and learn from these events so as to prevent ourselves from repeating the chain that lead to the tragedy. Safety is all about risk management whether that risk is from a car, plane, boat or taking a bath.
Death can be very ugly. It should be used to spur safety enchanements and alter processes. If we let the tragedy of others limit or restrict our enjoyable activity their would never be gain from loss.
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Old 06-27-2015, 02:08 PM   #23
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Paul Newman has a line in the excellent movie Hobre: "We all die. It's just a matter of when."

I think Jim summed the situation up very well in his post.

Something I learned years ago in flying, but it applies to everything we do, is "know your limitations." The ability to do this and then act on it has literally saved my and my wife's lives on several occasions while flying floats deep in the coast range of SE Alaska and BC. With no outside communications and, at the time, no satellite navigation or weather availability, in country where the mountains make their own weather right before your eyes, one is entirely on their own. The decisions one makes are the decisions that govern the success of one's undertaking and at times are the only things determining between life and death even though the outcome is unknown at the moment one makes the decision.

If one wants every advantage they can get in these situations, knowing one's limitations should be the very first item on the list. The second item should be never let the pressure to do something or be somewhere push you I to ignoring the first item.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:21 AM   #24
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We were cruising there this past week and heard the Pan Pan on the VHF. It was cancelled shortly after and I figured they were fine. Guess not. Definitely a shame, but we all take risks.
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Old 06-28-2015, 09:40 AM   #25
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Throughout Life:

Fate can be an unfortunate or fortunate aspect. I believe there are ways to live that may tend to protect against unfortunate fate and other ways that simultaneously may be a help in developing fortunate fate to occur. To each person their own regarding courses traveled. Then, of course, there is fate that could happen regarding any circumstance and that virtually cannot be avoided.

All in all... life is to be lived to the fullest extent possible while still doing one's best to not "Tempt [unfortunate] Fate". Seems to me that tempting fortunate fate is a really good way to go!

My condolences go to relatives and friends of all persons who have a sudden occurrence of unfortunate fate take their lives for any reason under any circumstance. I also send good energy to the souls departed.
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Old 06-28-2015, 11:03 AM   #26
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Earlier this spring we went to Glacier Bay with Holland America for our 30th anniversary. I cannot imagine a more sterilized, or risk/discomfort mitigated wilderness experience.

My impression of other peoples shore excursions is that they seemed to expect the 'safe cocooning' found on the cruise ship would follow them ashore, much like expecting Disneylands safety to extend beyond the front gate at days end.

My question is; were the risks explained up front, or were they buried in the fine print of the excursion contract?

We loved everything about Ketchikan.

What Art said......
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Old 06-28-2015, 03:34 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post

My impression of other peoples shore excursions is that they seemed to expect the 'safe cocooning' found on the cruise ship would follow them ashore, much like expecting Disneylands safety to extend beyond the front gate at days end.

My question is; were the risks explained up front, or were they buried in the fine print of the excursion contract?

We loved everything about Ketchikan.

What Art said......
Buried...just like the risk of operational issues or disease/illness. Problem is that people don't educate themselves. However, putting any of it too out in the open has consequences too and not just to the cruise line. What if it scares us from something we would really enjoy. I just saw a drug commercial on tv. The way they go through all the possible side effects, they scare you now regarding the drug, as they should. But if a cruise line advertisted and put the same disclosures, I think it would take a big toll.

We all have limited desires to want to know risk. We want some amount of knowledge but don't want to obsess over risk so much, we do nothing.
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Old 06-28-2015, 03:49 PM   #28
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The float plane flying in SE seems tame and taxi cab like compared to Western Alaska.
Once while leaving Platinum on the Bering Sea coast in November we were all anxious to get out (been working in a mine for 7 mos) and after several says of waiting for a plane one came .. a twin engined Beachcraft 18. The weather became legally non-flyable not long after he landed. A blizzard basically. Something below 0 and 40+ knots wind. The pilot said he was going back to Bethel and if anyone wanted they could jump in through the back door and please close it. We all piled in and closed the door. The crosswind takeoff was so crabby I don't think it could have been done on anything but snow and ice .. mostly the latter. But it turned out to be just another hop in the bush and we all were in an Anchorage hotel that night.
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Old 06-28-2015, 07:45 PM   #29
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"Seaplane Operations" - ditto.
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Old 06-28-2015, 08:02 PM   #30
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As well stated by Ken and Marin, the pressure on these float plane tour flight operators is considerable. A few weeks ago while cruising Misty Fjords we noted the hundreds of flights per week, adverse weather, 3000 foot cliffs and statistics for Alaska float flying. Sadly the points came together.

We are now in remote Alaska locales where float planes and boats are the only way to get around. Better yet no cruise ships.

Given the cruise industry's safety concerns about Mexico, their response to this tragedy will be interesting.
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