Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-12-2012, 11:14 AM   #41
Guru
 
ARoss's Avatar
 
City: Chocowinity NC
Vessel Name: My Yuki
Vessel Model: 1973 Marine Trader 34
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 625
Ensign aft, Carolina State flag on the bow pulpit, Yacht Club burgee and officer flag on the spreader.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P3290144.jpg
Views:	222
Size:	182.7 KB
ID:	12269  
__________________
Advertisement

ARoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 11:30 AM   #42
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,864
For lack of any better written guidance I would follow the USPS guide...

6.02 If the Maryland flag is flown on sailing vessels:

Sloops, cutters, and schooners

While underway - sailing vessels with one mast should fly the U.S. Ensign at the stern staff, or two-thirds of the way up the leech of the mainsail (or at the top of the leech, if gaff-rigged). The Maryland flag should fly at the starboard spreader, or on the forward mast of a schooner.

While at anchor - The U.S. Ensign should fly from the stern staff and the Maryland flag from the starboard spreader

Yawls and ketches

While underway - The U.S. Ensign should fly at the stern staff or at a position two-thirds up the leech of the mizzen sail (or at the peak of the leech of the mizzen sail, if gaff-rigged). The Maryland flag should fly at the starboard spreader ("at the starboard spreader" means the spreader on the most forward mast if more than one and from the most outboard hoist of that spreader).

While at anchor - The U.S. Ensign should fly from the stern staff and the Maryland flag from the starboard spreader.

6.03 If the Maryland flag is flown on motorboats:

While underway and at anchor - The U.S. Ensign should fly from the stern staff and the Maryland flag may be flown from the forestaff in lieu of a yacht club burgee.

Motorboats with auxiliary masts should follow the rules for sailboats.

__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 01:54 AM   #43
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
In 2001, we arrived in Australia right after midnight. About an hour later another vessel came in and rafted along side us. When Customs, Immigrations and Quarantine arrived in the morning to check us in, the other vessel was not flying the "Q" flag and they were cited.
.
Where did you moor/anchor awaiting Sydney Customs, Q flag displayed? Is there a designated area? The bay referred to as "Quarantine" inside the Heads to stbd ( where once people were off loaded for a week to see if they became sick), comes to mind.BruceK
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 04:36 AM   #44
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,254
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARoss View Post
Ensign aft, Carolina State flag on the bow pulpit, Yacht Club burgee and officer flag on the spreader.
Should we expect you to be a perfect mariner?

A couple of times I've reported to yacht club officials of their members not behaving in proper maritime manner such as not showing lights or making sounds in limited visibility, but the officials never responded.

Perhaps sailors should be reluctant showing their clubs' colors, or perhaps not?



View from anchor-light-displaying Carquinez Coot off Benicia, CA boat harbor, November 2011. Had expected the motoring sailboat to show a red side light and higher white light toward me as well as periodically sounding a prolonged signal, but I was disappointed.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 07:27 AM   #45
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Where did you moor/anchor awaiting Sydney Customs, Q flag displayed? Is there a designated area? The bay referred to as "Quarantine" inside the Heads to stbd ( where once people were off loaded for a week to see if they became sick), comes to mind.BruceK
Bruce: We cleared in at Scarborough, NW Morton Bay, Queensland. They had a Customs/Quarantine Dock that was fenced in. Australia takes their Quarantine/Customs/Immigrations very seriously.
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 05:58 PM   #46
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
I am reviving this thread to find out the proper display of an Air Force flag on a boat? My eldest son is currently serving and my middle son has enlisted and is wanting us to fly the flag.

Old Glory is appropriately displayed on our stern staff as it should be and we have an existing bow staff. I gather yacht club burgees would be flown on the bow staff but wonder if displaying the USAF flag in that position would be considered a breach of proper etiquette?

As an express cruiser we have limited flag placement options and no mast or halyards. We prefer to adhere to traditional protocol if possible.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 06:56 PM   #47
Guru
 
Insequent's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Insequent
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 50 Mk I
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,424
I'm curious about some flag positions as well. I'm Australian registered so I fly either blue (normal) or red Australian ensign at the stern. But where to fly the US flag as a courtesy flag? A reasonably knowledgeable friend advised:
1. Courtesy flag not to be higher than national flag
2. No courtesy flag at the bow, that is rude and insulting.

I don't have a gaff, so should it be national flag at top of mast, courtesy flag on starboard spreader and stern post empty?
__________________
Brian
Insequent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 07:01 PM   #48
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Insequent View Post
I'm curious about some flag positions as well. I'm Australian registered so I fly either blue (normal) or red Australian ensign at the stern. But where to fly the US flag as a courtesy flag? A reasonably knowledgeable friend advised:
1. Courtesy flag not to be higher than national flag
2. No courtesy flag at the bow, that is rude and insulting.

I don't have a gaff, so should it be national flag at top of mast, courtesy flag on starboard spreader and stern post empty?
Fly the US courtesy flag from the starboard spreader or if not one a starboard antenna. Your national ensign should be flown at the gaff or stern staff. I know of no rule about the courtesy flag has to not be higher than the national flag.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 09:35 PM   #49
Guru
 
Conrad's Avatar
 
City: Calgary
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blue Sky
Vessel Model: Nordic Tugs 42 Hull #001
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
Fly the US courtesy flag from the starboard spreader or if not one a starboard antenna. Your national ensign should be flown at the gaff or stern staff. I know of no rule about the courtesy flag has to not be higher than the national flag.
That is exactly my understanding as well.
__________________
Conrad
Berthed in
Campbell River BC
Conrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2013, 01:39 AM   #50
Hospitality Officer
 
Andy G's Avatar
 
City: Pittwater
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Sarawana
Vessel Model: IG 36 Quad Cabin
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,557
According to my old mate, a retired RN historian(yep it's true)the 'no higher protocol' refers to national flags raised side by side on land, it does not apply to maritime vessels.

He maintains that the courtesy flag should be flown on the starboard yard arm or gaff. I asked him what if the vessel had no yard arm or gaff, "shouldn't be on the bloody water then" was his reply.He's a bit old school.
Andy G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2013, 07:28 AM   #51
123
Member
 
City: ---
Country: ---
Vessel Name: ---
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 379
Nice topic, it seems the "rules" in the US are more or less the same as in Europe. This is what i found.

The Flag Advisor

Flag etiquette can be arcane and boggling. We surveyed Chapman’s Piloting and our flag maker for guidance and came up with some general recommendations for boaters:

Courtesy and National Flags

As a gesture of courtesy, cruisers should fly a foreign nation’s flag when they enter and operate in its waters.

Rule No. 1—There are no real rules. Customs observed in various foreign waters differ from each other. We’ve seen cases where not flying or flying a courtesy flag improperly causes some awkward moments; you may be regarded as impolite, but nothing more. In others, it’s local law to fly the flag. Officials can—and do—impound passports or assess fines until the proper flag—which, of course, can only be purchased locally at great expense—is flying on board. If in doubt, inquire of other cruisers and observe other craft from your country for guidance.
Do not fly a courtesy flag until your vessel is properly cleared by customs and immigration. Until clearance is complete, fly the yellow Q (quarantine) flag.
On a mastless powerboat, the courtesy flag replaces any flag that is normally flown at the bow.
If a powerboat has a mast with spreaders, the courtesy flag is flown at the starboard spreader.
On a two-masted powerboat, the courtesy flag displaces any flag normally flown at the forward spreader.
On a sailboat, the courtesy flag is flown at the starboard spreader. If the sailboat has more than one mast, the courtesy flag is flown from the starboard spreader of the forward mast.
Courtesy flags are usually Civil Ensigns—not the national flag of the country. Not every country has a civil ensign. However, most former British colonies do; it is usually the red variant of the flag. It’s considered a horrible breach of etiquette to fly the blue national flag. So, if the flag that we catalog doesn’t look exactly like the national flag that you remember, it’s probably a civil ensign.
Don’t fly a foreign courtesy flag after you return to U. S. waters. It may show that you’ve
’been there,’ but it’s not proper etiquette.
Generally, the vessel’s national flag is flown from the stern (or leach) when a courtesy flag displaces it.
It’s better form for U. S. vessels to fly the U. S. flag (the “stars and stripes” with a full complement of 50 stars) at the stern or gaff or leech, rather than a Yacht Ensign. If you want to fly a Yacht or USPS Ensign, do so from the port spreader on a sailboat. If there are multiple flag halyards available on the starboard spreader, the Yacht or USPS Ensign is flown there, inboard from the courtesy ensign.
Any citizen of any state may fly the flag of that state unless doing so is specifically prohibited. It should be flown at the main masthead in place of any private, yacht club, or officer’s flag. On a mastless boat, a state flag flies from either the bow or radio antenna.
No flag—state, heritage, Confederate, pirate, gag, or otherwise—except for the vessel’s national flag, should EVER fly from the stern of your vessel. This is considered a place of honor, for the vessel’s national flag and no other.

Sizing Flags

Chapman’s recommends the following:

The flag at the stern of your boat—U. S. Ensign, Yacht Ensign, USPS Ensign, or vessel’s national flag—should be one inch on the fly for every foot of overall vessel length (e. g. 48” flag for a 48’ foot vessel).
Other flags—club burgees, private signals, or courtesy flags—should be ” for every foot of overall vessel length.
Christine Davis differs with a somewhat more practical approach. She suggest that you let your eye be your guide. Generally, yachts up to 50’ in length look properly “dressed” with a 16” x 24” ensign and 12” x 18” courtesy flags. Size up one step for every 25-or-so additional feet in length. If you prefer the look of larger flags, go ahead—just make sure that there is a clear 360-degree fly from your halyards. Otherwise, your flags will soon be in tatters.

Other Flags

There are a number of flags that once were used on large yachts with professional crews (such as owner absent, cocktail, meal, etc.). Others are still common:

Diving Flags. There are two flags flown by diving operations: a red flag with a single diagonal stripe of white and International Code Flag “A”. It is generally no proper to fly dive flags on shore.
Quarantine Flag. International Code Flag “Q” is flown when entering a foreign port (except Canada and a few others) or when returning to a U. S. port from a foreign cruise. It signals to customs and immigration officials that you request clearance. Take it down and replace it with a courtesy flag after formalities are complete.
Union Jack. A rectangular blue flag with 50 stars, the Union Jack may be flown as follows:
Flying only at the jack staff—the bow staff on modern craft
Flying only during the day
Flying only when moored
Flying only on Sundays, national holidays, or when dressing ship

Dressing Ship

On national holidays, at regattas, and on other special occasions, yachts often “dress ship,” displaying a decorative collection of International Code signal flags. The following conventions are recommended:

Dress ship at 0800 and keep dress until nightfall.
Keep the dressed ship moored, except for its maiden or final voyages or for participation in parades.
Hoist the Ensign at the stern. Display the Union Jack (if desired) at the bow.
Hoist a rainbow of International Code Flags from the waterline forward to the waterline aft from stem (or bowsprit) to the masthead(s).
Bend on flags and pennants alternately. Since there are twice as many letter as numeral pennants, it is regarded as good practice to follow the following sequence:
Two flags, one pennant, two flags, one pennant, and so on
A popular example with an appealing color pattern is (from forward): AB2, UJ1, KE3, GH6, IV5, FL4, DM7, PO Third Repeater, RN First Repeater, ST Zero, CX9, WQ8, ZY Second Repeater.
Consult web page notes for signal flag set coverage.

Link: Flag etiquette

Cees
123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2013, 08:20 AM   #52
Senior Member
 
Gulfstar 36's Avatar
 
City: Kent Island
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sundowner
Vessel Model: Gulfstar 36 MrkII
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 226
Interesting post. But I’m ashamed to fly the flag of my state! If I had one I would cut it into strips and use it in the head. One other note on flags and pendants. On USN ships the church pendant is the only thing flown about the ensign. God before Country I presume.
Gulfstar 36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2013, 08:36 AM   #53
Senior Member
 
City: Green Turtle Cay/Western NC
Country: Bahamas/US
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 109
Ah, one of my favorite subjects! Flag etiquette is like table manners, some people have them, others do not.
Tingum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2013, 10:27 AM   #54
Guru
 
City: Pensacola
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 748
Fly your ensign from the stern and the Air Force flag pennant, from the bow. If you have a mast the stbd spreader is fine.
Blue Heron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2013, 08:32 PM   #55
Guru
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 677
psneed: Just had a flashback on account of your post - it went "Sweepers, man your brooms. Give the ship a clean sweep down fore and aft. Sweep down all lower decks, ladder backs, and passageways. Dump all garbage clear of the fantail. Sweepers".

Guess the "garbage over the fantail" part dates me. I'm sure it goes to the recycle unit now.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2013, 02:01 PM   #56
RED
Senior Member
 
RED's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 182
I note that Marin has it wrong in his picture. First of all, his boat has a cargo mast, not a sailing mast, so there is no gaff to fly the flag from. Also, even is one were to argue that the cargo mast can be used for a steadying sail, Marin is not flying the flag from what would be the gaff, because his flag is BELOW the cargo boom, and therefore being treated like a cargo lift, not a place of honor. I have seen sailing sloops attach a flag about 2/3 up the leech of the main, attempting to simulate a gaff position, but they are not gaff rigged.
RED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2013, 02:24 PM   #57
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Heron View Post
Fly your ensign from the stern and the Air Force flag pennant, from the bow. If you have a mast the stbd spreader is fine.
Thanks BH. Jives with my original thoughts was just checking first to avoid a protocol embarrassment. Flag etiquette is something we like to be respectful of and could not find an answer for our particular situation.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2013, 03:08 PM   #58
123
Member
 
City: ---
Country: ---
Vessel Name: ---
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 379
Today i learned something more. Only sailboats with a bend gaff rig are allowed to use a bend flag pole, all other ships use a straight flag pole....
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	gebogen.JPG
Views:	117
Size:	44.8 KB
ID:	19553   Click image for larger version

Name:	gebogen gaffel.jpg
Views:	130
Size:	135.8 KB
ID:	19554   Click image for larger version

Name:	rechte gaffel.jpg
Views:	134
Size:	23.8 KB
ID:	19555  
123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2013, 01:08 PM   #59
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,515
The only flag allowed to fly above the US Ensign is the Church Pennant and only when observing service.

In most countries NOT flying the flag of that nation at the stbd spreader (or similar for motorboats) is an act of WAR !!!

At a minimum there are fines and penalties for disrespecting the country you are visiting.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2013, 02:33 PM   #60
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,170
My daughter presented me the large US Flag shown flying from my radar mast. This flag was flown over the US Capitol on the day I retired.



I, too, want to comply with proper flag etiquette but find no prohibition to this display, in addition to flying the US flag from my stern flagstaff. Is anyone aware of any issues with this display?
__________________

__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
etiquete, flag

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012