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Old 03-25-2017, 10:56 AM   #21
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We essentially live on the boat from April to November on our small Nordic Tug 32/34. Do a lot of cruising and a lot of fishing. Cockpit is rigged with rail rod holders, plus several more attached inside cockpit and salon roof. Rods are carried in rail racks on salon roof. My walk-thru transom to swim platform makes landing large fish easy. Landing smaller fish over the rail with a net also not an issue. Trolling is a problem since at idle in gear, I'm doing over 3 knots, unless I'm going against current. Most of my fishing is in-shore and either drifting or anchored up. I also carry a 10' kayak on the salon roof rigged for fishing (kayak photo is my old 8' footer). I'll anchor out away from shore and take the kayak into the shore and rocks, giving me access to real fishy areas, like Block Island, Montauk, Cuttyhunk, Fishers Island, to name a few. I can use the dinghy as well for away-from-the-boat fishing. Go for it.

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Old 03-25-2017, 11:29 AM   #22
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We have used troll valves and dragging chutes on prior boats. Our current boat pulls chutes. They are secured from the bow cleat area and drag back to about midship. The trip line off the aft of the chutes is secured near the aft fishing deck. This arrangements keeps the chutes away from the Downriggers and the fishing gear and permits easy retrieval of the chutes and storage on the side decks.
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Old 03-25-2017, 02:04 PM   #23
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hjorgan I wish I could add to this conversation but since I don't like to eat fish I don't fish for it either.

However, my advice is to decide whether you are more interested in fishing and cruising coastal, or more interested in true offshore passages. A large cockpit close to the water does not go hand-in-hand with passage making.
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Old 03-25-2017, 03:34 PM   #24
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Troll valves are a simple installation for most transmissions if you want to go slower than 4 knots. Much simpler and safer than sea anchors in the water when fishing.

We usually troll at 5-7 knots for tuna or snook. These species seem to match trawler speeds very well.
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Old 03-25-2017, 04:32 PM   #25
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hjorgan ...... A large cockpit close to the water does not go hand-in-hand with passage making.
There are many owners of sportfishing boats who would disagree with you on that point. Me included.
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Old 03-25-2017, 04:38 PM   #26
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There are many owners of sportfishing boats who would disagree with you on that point. Me included.
I'd agree that a big cockpit can be a liability if it doesn't have adequate drainage, but I see no problem with a low cockpit.
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Old 03-25-2017, 04:51 PM   #27
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I'd agree that a big cockpit can be a liability if it doesn't have adequate drainage, but I see no problem with a low cockpit.
...and adequate speed to minimize overtaking waves.
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Old 03-25-2017, 05:35 PM   #28
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Thanks to all, I'm encouraged by the fish pics. We haven't pull the trigger on a trawler yet. This thread helps me know that features will make fishing more of an option.
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Old 03-25-2017, 08:57 PM   #29
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I fish from my swim platform. I use one engine and have outrigger poles, flopper stoppers and drags to slow down enough for salmon. With outrigger poles it's easy to set speed doing S turns. Fish coming on the outside pole means you were going too slow, etc.
Tuna like a fast lure. On commercial gear, you troll on the surface and set your speed to just below where the hook is ripped out when they strike. After the early morning bite, planners will keep the tuna biting. If you get in a school, the swim platform is a good place to pole tuna. I have a rail that's removable. Commercially, I have landed a ton in an hour by myself. I carry 2 small freezers just for tuna.
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Old 03-25-2017, 11:10 PM   #30
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...and adequate speed to minimize overtaking waves.
Totally agree, but then again, technically speaking, I don't really have a 'Trawler' anymore.
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Old 03-26-2017, 04:22 AM   #31
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There are many owners of sportfishing boats who would disagree with you on that point. Me included.

We're talking about two different animals here... a sportfish is not a passagemaker. Also, nobody outruns seas when crossing an ocean and they are 20-30 feet high - at that point you are approaching survival conditions for a small boat.

So once again, the OP has to do what all of us need to do and clearly define his personal needs.
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Old 03-26-2017, 07:47 PM   #32
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It appears you have received many comments in support of fishing from a trawler. I have spent as many as 10 hours a day depending on the fish species I am fishing for and weather conditions fishing.

Dipsy divers can be used instead of down riggers although you don't quite get the depth you may need to reach the fish. Bottom fishing can be great for whatever species of fish for.

Trolling 4 knots doesn't seem to be an issue pulling a 8 inch Rapala if you can fight off the seals. If I need to go slower the use of a small gas powered trolling motor works well. Netting, harpooning, or gaffing not a big issue unless you latch on to large fish which I have and that can get interesting.

We take a little from the sea for our own consumption. Its great because you have freshly caught for the table. Crabbing and shrimping can also result in success. You can always fish in calm waters from a kayak or tender.

I own a 22ft bass boat and I'd almost rather fish from my trawler because of the diverse and out of the way places you can go. It can be a lot of fun traveling to your next destination as you watch you graph and come upon a hump, school of fish, or interesting structure. Just stop, give it a whirl, and usually fish on!

Good luck in your decision. Personally we've never had any regrets.
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Old 03-26-2017, 09:41 PM   #33
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My boat may not be considered a trawler, but IMO it is more trawler like than a traditional sportfisher. It is a Mikelson Nomad, built semi-custom to my specs, which were focused on making it tan excellent long range sportfisher.

Whether a trawler, or any other boat, is good for fishing depends in part on the species sought. For example, tournament marlin fishing requires a very fast boat and a tower for spotting fish. My boat is not fast enough (I typically travel at 8.5 - 10 knots, max cruise is 16 -17 (burning a ton of fuel) and max speed is 19 - 20).

My favorite target is offshore tuna, and the boat is well set up for that. 30 rod holders in the cockpit (not counting those mounted in the transom and gunnel), very large bait tanks in the cockpit, plus a smaller one on the bow, 800 pound/day ice maker to care for the fish, large self-bailing cockpit, the swim platform is integral to the hull and the stern has a reverse angle so backing down is a breeze, although the cockpit is about 12" above waterline, the swimplatform is only a few inches above, so it is really easy to get to a hooked fish if need be. The fishfinding electronics includes scanning sonar, which really helps when trolling -- if fish are spotted 300 or 400 feet off to one side or the other, a simple course change takes my spread right past them -- often results in hookups that would not have happened otherwise. And there is a tower for spotting breaking fish, etc. There are not supports or other obstructions that have to be worked around when chasing a fish around the boat. And with 2300 gallons of fuel, averaging better than 1 to one, even accounting for genset use (which is on 24/7), we have the ability to go loooong.

So, I think it is fair to say that at least some trawlers can excel as fishing platforms.

So, to answer your question,
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Old 03-26-2017, 09:54 PM   #34
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Often when a person learns I've a boat, they ask "do you fish"? When I answer in the negative, their facial expressions say "what a weird bird you are."

Typical San Francisco Estuary fishermen:



Fishing in Turkey (Istanbul):

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Old 03-26-2017, 10:43 PM   #35
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s. A large cockpit close to the water does not go hand-in-hand with passage making.
Thousands of prawn trawlers in Australia would disagree.
Our cockpit floor level is about 3 ft above the water.
When she was a working boat similar to the picture she used to do several thousand mile trips from Brisbane to the Gulf of Carpentaria chasing grubs.

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Old 03-27-2017, 12:49 AM   #36
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My favorite target is offshore tuna, and the boat is well set up for that. 30 rod holders in the cockpit (not counting those mounted in the transom and gunnel), very large bait tanks in the cockpit, plus a smaller one on the bow, 800 pound/day ice maker to care for the fish, large self-bailing cockpit, the swim platform is integral to the hull and the stern has a reverse angle so backing down is a breeze, although the cockpit is about 12" above waterline, the swimplatform is only a few inches above, so it is really easy to get to a hooked fish if need be. The fishfinding electronics includes scanning sonar, which really helps when trolling -- if fish are spotted 300 or 400 feet off to one side or the other, a simple course change takes my spread right past them -- often results in hookups that would not have happened otherwise. And there is a tower for spotting breaking fish, etc. There are not supports or other obstructions that have to be worked around when chasing a fish around the boat. And with 2300 gallons of fuel, averaging better than 1 to one, even accounting for genset use (which is on 24/7), we have the ability to go loooong.

So, I think it is fair to say that at least some trawlers can excel as fishing platforms.

So, to answer your question,
That sounds incredible!! I want to go fishing with you!

Ever caught a 6 ft sturgeon?
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