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Old 12-04-2018, 08:25 AM   #1
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The First Glass Boats

Shared on the PsssageMaker Facebook page this morning.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...096953196&_rdr
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Old 12-05-2018, 11:08 AM   #2
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Love the guys wearing jackets and ties laying the fiberglass...
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Old 12-05-2018, 11:48 AM   #3
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Thatnis how I dress to work on my boat, doesnít everybody dress like that?
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Old 12-05-2018, 05:58 PM   #4
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Thatnis how I dress to work on my boat, doesnít everybody dress like that?
Me, too. Only fitting - my bride wears chiffon cocktail dresses and heels when she does house cleaning.
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:08 PM   #5
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I find this subject fascinating. I'd love to find a more in depth video.
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:29 PM   #6
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I find this subject fascinating. I'd love to find a more in depth video.
After seeing this yesterday I did a quick Google of fiberglass. One of the things I found that, while they had been trying to work out how to do it, the answer was discovered by accident. Someone was pouring liquid glass and it was hit by a blast of compressed air by mistake and... surprise, glass fibers were the result!
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:36 PM   #7
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Greetings,
Mr.m. Interesting about the FG. I hadn't heard that BUT the question STILL remains...Who discovered how to make glass? Not talking about terrestrial glass (volcanic/lightening fused) or extra terrestrial glass (meteorites) but man made.


Edit: Regarding the clothing in the OP...It was filmed in England in the 40's/50's. Not uncommon for even tradesmen to wear a jacket and tie in pursuit of their livelihood. Prim and proper British.
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Old 12-05-2018, 08:48 PM   #8
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I remember in the early 50’s an add by “Beetle Boats”.
They were heavy and crude. But they kept at it.
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Old 12-06-2018, 08:32 PM   #9
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Edit: Regarding the clothing in the OP...It was filmed in England in the 40's/50's. Not uncommon for even tradesmen to wear a jacket and tie in pursuit of their livelihood. Prim and proper British.[/QUOTE]


My Uncle, a farmer in Ireland wore a suit every day. Pictures my mother has of her childhood show her father wearing at least what looks like a dress shirt and vest in most shots.

They, mom, Uncle Jimmy and four other sisters grew up on a farm with no electricity or running water and cooked on an open fire.

Rob
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:29 PM   #10
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Dare to Dream.

Can you imagine how much negative pressure they got from some traditionalists?
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Old 12-07-2018, 07:05 AM   #11
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Greetings,
Mr.m. Interesting about the FG. I hadn't heard that BUT the question STILL remains...Who discovered how to make glass? Not talking about terrestrial glass (volcanic/lightening fused) or extra terrestrial glass (meteorites) but man made.


Edit: Regarding the clothing in the OP...It was filmed in England in the 40's/50's. Not uncommon for even tradesmen to wear a jacket and tie in pursuit of their livelihood. Prim and proper British.
I spent a good amount of time in the Middle East and distinctly remember seeing glass pieces made 3,000 year ago. Remember them because I was surprised the process was that old. I think glass blowing is much newer but still an ancient art (quick Google shows somewhere around 100 BC) and some still make a living at it today. Go figure.
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Old 12-07-2018, 09:12 AM   #12
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Dare to Dream.

Can you imagine how much negative pressure they got from some traditionalists?

Yes, and that pressure lasted a long time. Higher end boat builders refused to use it until it was very well proven. I also understand that when larger boats began to be built with FG the hulls were massively overbuilt.
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Old 12-07-2018, 10:17 AM   #13
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That’s one reason there are so many old Hatteras’s out there: they were built like battleships until they learned how to use the minimum amount of fiber and resin instead of the maximum.
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Old 12-10-2018, 03:36 PM   #14
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Bet he itched some!

Watching the video, I was struck by the lack of any at all PPE, no gloves, no safety glasses, no coveralls. no face mask. Bet those guys itched a little! Wonder what the follow on medical history was, I suspect perhaps some lung issues.
By the way, a good book on the early days of fiberglas boat building is "Heart of Glass" that traces some of the early FG boat builders in the US from the early '60's.
Merry Christmas everybody!!
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Old 12-10-2018, 04:36 PM   #15
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Dare to Dream.

Can you imagine how much negative pressure they got from some traditionalists?
That hasnít even died yet. If I was having a new boat built now Iíd opt for wood. Thereís many advantages for either material.

The first really big advantage was that FG boats could easily be built in shapes that would require a very high level of craftsmanship. Many such shapes were just not built in wood for that reason. But other shapes like a sharp edge between the transom and the bottom (that reduced drag) was easily done in wood but most all production FG boats were limited to about 1/4 to 3/8Ē radius.

But of course the big reduction in labor was the controling factor in what material would survive in the marketplace. That made the FG boats appear cheap. But Riva eventially went FG much to my astonishment. The concept that wood rotted (imagine that) took over and almost nobody wanted a wood boat after that. There are hundreds of comments on this forum to that end.

Well, I donít own any wood boats now but it has nothing to do w rot. I choose one 18í FG boat (Winner) over all the others because it didnít have wood stringers. Had the boat for over 20 yrs. The bottom is stiffened and supported by a FG insert that looks much like an egg carton. And laminated to the inside of the bottom. Design over the low labor wood (in this case) saved many owners in years to come of the huge job of replacing the wood stringers. Haha my plywood floor is soft in quite a few small places where screws were used to fasten things like seats. But the floor is easy to replace compared to stringers.

A new or fairly new wood boat is wonderful but old ones are mostly to stay clear of unless one is really motivated. Re the wood boat thing something to think about is that wood boats (especially planked ones) are made of many many pieces of wood and most are somewhat easy to replace like a muffler on a car. Gotta do it though when it comes time. And then thereís fasteners .....
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Old 12-10-2018, 04:38 PM   #16
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Exctyengr,
When I worked at Uniflite in the shop (70’s) we all washed in a huge tub of acetone about 3” deep. With our bare hands.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:02 PM   #17
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[Mr.m. Interesting about the FG. I hadn't heard that BUT the question STILL remains...Who discovered how to make glass? Not talking about terrestrial glass (volcanic/lightening fused) or extra terrestrial glass (meteorites) but man made]

RT, perhaps you can make a pilgrimage of sorts to the Corning Museum of Glass, oddly enough in Corning, NY. Well worth the visit and be prepared to be blown away! Thereís something for everybody, but the permanent exhibit on the history of glass is utterly incredible. It starts with 4K year old middle eastern stuff but by Greek and Roman times, the objects are as beautiful and technically perfect as anything you could imagine. (There is also an exhibit of stuff made with natural glass.) Youíll be brain dead by the time you make it into the late 19th c.

And then, pop over to the Glenn Curtiss Museum in Hammondsport, NY.
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:30 PM   #18
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[Mr.m. Interesting about the FG. I hadn't heard that BUT the question STILL remains...Who discovered how to make glass? Not talking about terrestrial glass (volcanic/lightening fused) or extra terrestrial glass (meteorites) but man made]

RT, perhaps you can make a pilgrimage of sorts to the Corning Museum of Glass, oddly enough in Corning, NY. Well worth the visit and be prepared to be blown away! Thereís something for everybody, but the permanent exhibit on the history of glass is utterly incredible. It starts with 4K year old middle eastern stuff but by Greek and Roman times, the objects are as beautiful and technically perfect as anything you could imagine. (There is also an exhibit of stuff made with natural glass.) Youíll be brain dead by the time you make it into the late 19th c.

And then, pop over to the Glenn Curtiss Museum in Hammondsport, NY.


Both excellent.
Let me know if you are in the area...
I'll provide regreshments.
About the origins of glass... interesting that early attributions (unsubstantiated) were given to sailors
https://www.cmog.org/article/origins-glassmaking

Re first FG boats. http://www.pslc.ws/macrog/mpm/compos...as/history.htm

Also see https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...N8ZFOD4xbU2nov
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Old 12-10-2018, 11:09 PM   #19
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FG boats are not really glass boats.
They are plastic boats. People call them glass boats because the word plastic is ofensive. They are fibreglass reinforced plastic boats. Like reinforced concrete w rebar. But the FG boats are plastic boats.
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Old 12-11-2018, 08:19 AM   #20
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You do realize that fiberglass is made from real glass? Calling a boat “glass” is a lot easier than saying “glass resin matrix” , I’m not sure if there is any actual plastic in a boat. Unless it’s made from an injection molded thermosetting material.........
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