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Old 11-07-2019, 07:27 AM   #21
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take a read


Offshore with a dinghy
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:28 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
You forgot two: It obscures the boat name and hailing port. Not unfixable. Coming down off plane causes some backwash. Manageable.

Backing into a slip isn't an issue; we do that (everything) from the flybridge (only helm station) and our visibility is great.

Yep, it adds a few feet to OAL. Cost of doing business, as we don't like our other option (bow mounted).

Following seas aren't great, but we're mostly inland, we can choose our time to go offshore -- or usually anywhere -- for a while), so it hasn't become an issue.

Dink (except for the outboard) is below our line of sight from cockpit seating; no significant obstruction.

Our davit system is a cantilevered mount, so there's about 18" between the mother-ship transom and the dinghy tubes. Walkable, but we do have to pay enough attention so we don't trip over the davit mounts.

Can't say it looks great, but it doesn't look horrible (to us) and the launch/recovery system is very fast and easy. In our case, as long as we have sufficient clear space to our port side.

You probably couldn't make it out in our avatar, but much of our davit system comes off relatively easily (and is off, in the avatar) so we have no significant obstructions when we're fishing...

-Chris

THanks for an honest answer
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:29 AM   #23
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An 8 Ft is too small I agree. We had an 8.5 and it was very tight.
Now have a 10.5 RIB with a 15 2 stroke and it's perfect.
If you have room on the transom for a 10 ft RIB and can mount it so you can use your transom door, that would be the best set up in my opinion for convenience.
Good luck sorting this out.
Happy cruising!
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Old 11-07-2019, 08:16 AM   #24
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Never had any issues with our inflatables tipped up on the swim step or when they were carried on the boat deck - so far only 30 years or so of practice.
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Old 11-07-2019, 08:27 AM   #25
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I'm still having the dinghy debate myself. Our current cruising plans don't make one particularly necessary, but at some point that will change. Even then, I don't anticipate using it all the time, so I'm kinda torn between something like a Porta-bote vs an air floor inflatable in terms of practicality.

Storage-wise, I'm figuring an inflatable would get deflated for storage, or either one could be lashed down at an angle on the bow across the forward seat (need to measure how long a dink will fit there). And that doesn't block the forward deck hatch for egress. For me, swim platform mount or davits are a no-go, as this boat is quite stern heavy already with full tanks, so I'd rather keep the weight more forward. Outboard would probably have to sit near the stern though, unless I decide I like rowing.
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Old 11-07-2019, 08:44 AM   #26
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Thanks for all the great input! The largest I can put on the swim platform without interfering with the transom door is 9' using the horizontal pull-up style (Hurley or Trickdavits). I do like the Seawise system and it would allow for a larger dink but more $ and more parts/weight to hang on the stern. I have considered putting it up top as many of these boat are fitted that way but this would be much more expensive and complicated. I have talked to some owners who think this crane setup is a hassle to the point that they tend to avoid using it.
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Old 11-07-2019, 09:25 AM   #27
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This really depends on where you will be using your boat and whether you are an anchor-out or marina person - basically, how far you need your dingy to go, and what type of weather (or boat wakes) you'll encounter. We will be leaving on an open-ended cruise from the Pacific side of Mexico and eventually end up in Florida and I anticipate some lengthy runs in the dingy, and quite a bit of beaching of the dingy. For us, largest dingy we can carry is about 11-feet, and boat-deck is our only real option. Pull-start OB of at least 15hp, preferably 20hp to ensure planing with a full load of groceries/ice/etc. Probably lean towards aluminum RIB due to weight.
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Old 11-07-2019, 09:28 AM   #28
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I have considered putting it up top as many of these boat are fitted that way but this would be much more expensive and complicated. I have talked to some owners who think this crane setup is a hassle to the point that they tend to avoid using it.
Consider Nick Jackson pipe-davits in PNW. For small dingy's, they are reasonably priced and simple to use. It is more of a hassle to hoist a dingy into place - especially if there are any waves, but its a secure and safe method to store a dingy.
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Old 11-07-2019, 10:59 AM   #29
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Question

What happens when it rains hard and adds a lot weight.


you forget to cover it or remove drain plug
a unexpected downpour occurs
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Old 11-07-2019, 10:59 AM   #30
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Thanks for all the great input! The largest I can put on the swim platform without interfering with the transom door is 9' using the horizontal pull-up style (Hurley or Trickdavits). I do like the Seawise system and it would allow for a larger dink but more $ and more parts/weight to hang on the stern. I have considered putting it up top as many of these boat are fitted that way but this would be much more expensive and complicated. I have talked to some owners who think this crane setup is a hassle to the point that they tend to avoid using it.
"The largest I can put on the swim platform without interfering with the transom door is 9' using the horizontal pull-up style (Hurley or Trickdavits)."

If your transom door hugs one side of the boat and you put the dinghies bow on that side and favor the other you may find that you can accommodate a larger one - we found that anyway.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:01 AM   #31
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What happens when it rains and adds a lot weight.


you forget to cover it or remove drain plug
a unexpected downpour occurs
The dinghies we have carried we leave the transom plug out of.
The dinghies we have towed all have self bailing hulls.
The dinghies we tip up on the swim step do not fill up.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:01 AM   #32
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What happens when it rains and adds a lot weight.


you forget to cover it or remove drain plug
a unexpected downpour occurs

like everything on a boat...gotta be smater than the equipment or all of it can bite you one way or another....


EVERY option has it's plusses and minuses.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:11 AM   #33
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If going small and light consider an electric outboard. They are great for putting around the anchorage or to and from the dock. Light weight, no starting, no gas or oil, no noise. If you expect to go commuting many miles, then larger and more powerful will definitely be better.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:17 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lipets View Post
Those of you that have transom or stern mounted dinks explain the following please


visibility when backing into a slip

Pay more for a dock due to added length


Following seas

Sitting in cockpit looking aft

Getting on/off boat


How about simply how it looks

Lipets,
On our boat, visibility when backing with the dinghy on the stern is very good with the possible exception of the last couple of feet of dock space. For us the pilot can look out the side deck and see very well, as well, the "docking partner" would be at the stern giving directions via wireless headset. Therefore, no issue that can't be overcome.

The dinghy mounted this way adds about 1.5 to 2 feet to the LOA, not a biggy, and would certainly not be a make or break as far as boat expenses go.

So far the dinghy has been no issue at all in following seas. However, we are coastal cruisers and will not be going off shore, such as down the west coast to Mexico, therefore not a real issue for us IMO. We have been out in 2-3 meter seas and everything was fine in that regard.

When sitting in the cockpit, it can block some of the view. Solution, deploy it (in about 2 minutes with minimal effort) and it is out of the way!!
Getting on and off the boat. With our setup we have almost the full width of the swim grid to work with and can exit very easily to starboard which is the side we dock to 98% of the time. At anchor, just deploy if the full swim grid is needed. If does however, stop you from "just walking" straight off the back. If that is desired, deploy the dinghy and tie it along side, or in front of your boat.

Look is simply a personal preference and to each his own. I find some boats are more attractive than others Also as time goes on, a person can get used to almost anything in that regard.

As to the name and port thing, we have the boat name and port (vinyl decal) on the bottom of the RIB dinghy, so no issue there either.


For the OP, as far as the weight issue of the Seawise parts, not really that big of a deal. Yes a few pounds of added weight, but less than adding a crane up top. However, you are correct, the Seawise is not cheap!!


All davit systems (even towing a dinghy) have their pros and cons (just like boats). We feel that our setup provides great convenience and ease of use and to us, therefore the positives far outweigh the negatives.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:21 AM   #35
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I think having dink with big motor is not needed at all.


A 10' with a 4-6 hp is much easier to get on/off the boat and will get you there with way less hassle.


Why do you need go like a bat out of hell in a dink?


Oh and your wallet will be happier

We use our tender for fishing, prawning and crabbing. Usually have to travel a distance from the anchorage through some rough water to get to the fishing area.

And with a larger tender, you get a console, windshield, comfortable seating, VHF, fishfinder, plotter and the most important - a powerful stereo. Add to that an electric downrigger, prawn pot puller and large cooler for the catch.

We carry it on the boat deck. It's lifted up there with a Nick Jackson pipe davit. We pull the drain plug, it does have an automatic bilge pump.

The tender is heavy enough that it does not swing around during lifting and lowering.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:58 AM   #36
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My 49ft MT came with an 11-ft Gloucester Yacht Sailboat/tender. 5 ft beam and 200lbs without a motor. Not sure if I will keep that or ?? Does this make an effective dinghy? Not trying to hijack the thread here, just a little sidetrack.
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Old 11-07-2019, 12:15 PM   #37
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And with a larger tender, you get a console, windshield, comfortable seating, VHF, fishfinder, plotter and the most important - a powerful stereo.
My best friend has a beautiful powercat with a RIB/Center Console and 60hp Yamaha - can't pull it up on a beach, and he worries about it at dinghy docks and worries about keeping the battery charged. He thinks my simple approach of a 11-foot RIB with tiller-steer pull-start OB and handheld VHF is uncivilized. It's a holy war - each of us in convinced the other is nuts. As far as remembering to put in a drain plug, all I can say is that in 20+ years of owning the same boat, it hasn't been a problem. But it's a good shout-out, but so far hasn't been an issue.

My boat has a canoe stern so no swim platform anyway. As an observer, biggest benefit I can see to the tip-up style of dinghy storage is it's easy to launch dinghy when bow-in to a slip. Biggest downside is the swim platform is unusable unless dinghy is deployed. For cruising in other countries where theft is a problem, it's more susceptible to theft.
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Old 11-07-2019, 01:53 PM   #38
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I think having dink with big motor is not needed at all.
It is if you actually need to do miles safely.
We have actually had to take our raw water pump and windlass motor in for repair while stranded in semi remote areas in 30 knot winds.
Luckily in this instance it only required several miles punching around an island to where a high speed ferry took them back to the mainland but a dink would have had a very tough and wet time of it.

I could, if I had to, have punched 20 or more miles back to the mainland myself if needs be.
The little dink would have made a sad news story.


Quote:
A 10' with a 4-6 hp is much easier to get on/off the boat and will get you there with way less hassle.
I would get that small dink off the boat in exactly the same way as I get the big tender off.
There would be zero saving in time or effort of which there is little anyway.

In the above example it possibly wouldn't have got me there at all.


Quote:
.
Why do you need go like a bat out of hell in a dink?
Its not about going like a bat out of hell.
Its about having the ability to cover miles in a safe robust tender when needed.


Quote:
. Oh and your wallet will be happier
We regularly bring back a full 200 litre/50gallon water bladder to add to our tankage
We bring back several months worth of provisions at a time
Ability to do this has allowed us to not need a marina in 4 years.
Our wallet is much happier for doing so to the tune of around $43000.

We started of with a small dink.with a 4hp
Within days upgraded to a 3.5 m alloy v nose punt with a 15hp
And less than a year later got what we have now and never for a second regret that decision.
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Old 11-07-2019, 01:56 PM   #39
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It is if you actually need to do miles safely.
We have actually had to take our raw water pump and windlass motor in for repair while stranded in semi remote areas in 30 knot winds.
Luckily in this instance it only required several miles punching around an island to where a high speed ferry took them back to the mainland but a dink would have had a very tough and wet time of it.

I could, if I had to, have punched 20 or more miles back to the mainland myself if needs be.
The little dink would have made a sad news story.
This seems to me to be very dependent on where you cruise. For some cruising in remote areas, yes, that capability is absolutely somewhere between very useful and necessary. For a lot of people, there will never be a true need to go that far or in water that open with the dink.
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Old 11-07-2019, 02:14 PM   #40
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Lots of really good points in this thread, one of which is that there is no perfect dink. Here the tidal zones are extreme, and having a boat to drag back into the water when the tide goes out is an issue, as is dragging it up above the tide line when you land on a beach.

Since I usually plan to anchor close to where I land, an inflatable with an air floor and small outboard is enough. I never have more than about four on board, so my Achilles 9 1/2' with a six HP has enough room and power, though it will not plane out with more than two on board. The Achilles weighs less than 70 lbs without the motor attached, and often I choose to row in so carrying it above the tide line is easier. I single hand a lot, so being able to deal with it by myself is a large consideration.

As long as I have enough speed to overcome the tidal currents coming back to the boat I am satisfied, and I do all of my shrimping and fishing from my boat, not my dink.
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