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Old 09-10-2012, 11:42 AM   #21
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I see us doing pretty much the same things with a 30 footer as we did with our kayaks, in that we'd go to an isolated bay, I would take my camera gear and explore the beaches, creeks, rivers, forests, and mountains while my wife stayed in camp (or now on the boat) writing and reading. More like a base camp than a live aboard.

What we would lose in access with kayaks (such as small uncharted pocket beaches near Cape Caution with bright orange sand so fine it squeaks when you walk) will be made up for in warm, dry, distance gobbling comfort.
More than likely you'll be able to carry the kayak (or two) on the deck and hand launch them for trips into the coves and thin water you're prohibited from taking the boat into. The best of both worlds. I certainly wouldn't get rid of them till you knew if you could take them with you.
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Old 09-10-2012, 12:13 PM   #22
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I sure hope not (in answer to OP) as I'm looking at 35-40 foot trawler style boats for my first owned boat.
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Old 09-10-2012, 02:32 PM   #23
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For the PNW where you live, a vessel large enough for diesel heat, comfortable o'nites, maintenance access and safety is always a good idea. On this Forum R Cooke has a trailerable boat he uses in the PNW, you may want to consider that approach as you ponder alternatives. There are many 30' trailer boats suitable for the Prince Rupert - Kitimat area. I've spent much time on a 30' Osprey in the PNW and it is perfect for fishing, safety o'nites and staying warm.

But, all 25' to 30' boats are not created equal. Some are junk and some are not. A low inital purchase price can be misleading as you pour money into getting it up to expectations and beyond.
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Old 09-10-2012, 02:44 PM   #24
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And a stern thruster to straighten out the prop walk. I'd even like to have one of those especially when backing down on an anchor.
He could get a 28'Bayliner cheap cheap and try that for awhile but he'd not get his money back but then it would be peanuts compared to anything I can think of. As I recall he lives way up a long canal so would be able to put the speed to good use being employed w Jobs. Mind wandering again.
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Old 09-10-2012, 03:59 PM   #25
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30 feet shouldn't be too big, and from what you describe as your usage, is probably just about right. We went from a 17 foot bow rider to a 30 ft sailboat, and it has been a perfect size for us. Learning to drive the bigger boat wasn't all that difficult, although I did have a lot of experience driving other people's boats prior to our moving up. All that said, do check on insurance before you write a check. Despite 20 plus years of boating experience, most insurers wouldn't even give us a quote when we moved to the 30footer. BoatUS was one of the only ones willing to insure us at the time. We are now looking to move to a Camano 31 - loa about the same as our sailboat but more usable room. For us, it is plenty big to spend vacations on - other might say it is way too small for more than a weekend. Really it comes down to your own personal experience. And lenght alone isn't the only thing to consider - beam makes a big difference. An extra foot or two in the sam width boat won't seem like much, but add an extra foot to the width of the boat and you really add a lot of space. So, check out lots of different boats before you make a choice.
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Old 09-10-2012, 05:32 PM   #26
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The perfect boat should.
Drink 6.
Dine 4.
Sleep 2.

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Old 09-10-2012, 08:32 PM   #27
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Our first boat was a 27' with an 8' beam. we got tired of that very fast and within 2 years went to a 32' with an 11-1/2' beam. we kept that for 18 years. Plenty of room for 1 week cruises for 2 of us. As we got older our requirements changed. We wanted diesel instead of gas, a fly bridge with stairs instead of a ladder, a bed you could access from both sides. for the last 5 years we've had a 39' with a 14' beam.
30' is probably a nice size to start with, but for a novice it's a lot of boat when docking. Decide what you want, then practice docking a lot and you'll have no problems.
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Old 09-11-2012, 05:31 AM   #28
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Use to be a starter boat was a good idea, in the current boat market you would be better to get a keeper and you will avoid having to upgrade in the near future.

There are tons of good deals out there, I think something around 36' should be your goal. Small enough to handle but large enough to seriously cruise on. More storage space and range.

Our 32 works for us, but it is still a bit like camping out. Once you start upgrading your new boat you will not want to change to a bigger one. The hassle of selling and buying a bigger one will cost you a lot more than getting a good size boat in the first place.

IMHO JohnP
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:01 AM   #29
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The perfect boat should.
Drink 6.
Dine 4.
Sleep 2.

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As you wish. Small Craft Advisor - Com-Pac 16 Trawler

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Old 09-11-2012, 09:25 AM   #30
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30 ft is not too big. Actually, not very big if you take long trips, but still do-able. Once you learn to dock the boat, size could be an advantage. I find that the bigger and heavier a boat is, the slower things happen. That will be a big help in handling with cross winds and current.
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Old 09-11-2012, 11:10 AM   #31
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Ben2go,
Love the Com-Pac. One of my favorite ideas is to convert a sailboat to a powerboat.
Most boats of this type are ruined by an ugly cabin hastily put together or emerging from simply bad taste. Com-Pac definitely hasn't suffered that fate.
Another overpowered boat though. I've been known to overpower small OB boats in engine choice but run them at 1/3 throttle .. nice and quiet.
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