Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-28-2012, 07:05 PM   #1
Guru
 
Arctic Traveller's Avatar


 
City: Juneau Alaska
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Arctic Traveller
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 619
Fire, it could happen to you too

A huge tragedy was averted Thursday night when on of our boats caught fire at 1:00AM. Two people barely escaped with their lives. It's quite likely the fact that one was a light sleeper is the only reason they are alive today. Were all very shaken by this, that they got away is a true miracle. Watching your boat burn is a visual I never want to see again. At this time, we don't know what started the fire, there are a couple theories, but I can't go into them.

A fire aboard a boat might just be the scariest thing that could happen to you. I would encourage everyone to take a fresh look at their boat the next time they are aboard, and think about the possibility for a fire. What possible sources of fuel could you remove? Do you store paint, rags, solvent, fuel cans, or other flammable materials in the engine room? Is your wiring in good shape? When was the last time you had your fire extinguishers serviced? Do you have smoke / carbon monoxide alarms with fresh batteries in every habitable space? How would you get out if a fire happened? Do you have more than one exit route and is it blocked? Do you use extension cords instead of proper fixed wiring? The list goes on and on, but the idea is to remove the fuel and possible ignition sources.

Don't let this happen to you, boats are just and can be replaced, but loved ones can never be replaced. Please think about this...........Arctic Traveller

Seattle luxury yacht destroyed in fire | NWCN.com Washington - Oregon - Idaho
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Trawler training and yacht charters at www.arctictraveller.com
Arctic Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 07:17 PM   #2
Veteran Member
 
City: Prince Rupert,BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Salty Bear
Vessel Model: Ta Yang Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 41
Omg!
We were just talking about "if a fire broke out on the boat"......
I know our fire extinguishers are current but I will be checking the alarm batteries.
__________________

Salty Bear II is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 09:18 PM   #3
Guru
 
swampu's Avatar


 
City: Biloxi, MS
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cajun Rose
Vessel Model: Biloxi Lugger
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,144
Glad everyone made it. Batteries, blow up all the time. They are dangerous you know.
swampu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 09:50 PM   #4
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by swampu View Post
Glad everyone made it. Batteries, blow up all the time. They are dangerous you know.
You betcha...just tried to charge a dead garden tractor battery overnight. Woke up... and it wasn't charged and was almost too hot to handle. Put it on a steel trailer hitch carrier and drove 15 miles to the store to replace it and turn it in as a core. After 15 miles out in the wind and on the truck for another 15 minutes while I dickered...brough it in and it was still hot!!!!
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 10:01 PM   #5
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,562
By law our houses must have smoke alarms but I never considered them for the boat. Domestic battery powered alarms are cheap, and can be sensitive, possibly easily set off when cooking inside,but on balance a good idea.
Anyone have them already? What are your experiences?
BruceK
BruceK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 10:05 PM   #6
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
By law our houses must have smoke alarms but I never considered them for the boat. Domestic battery powered alarms are cheap, and can be sensitive, possibly easily set off when cooking inside,but on balance a good idea.
Anyone have them already? What are your experiences?
BruceK
Would never think of going asleep without smoke and CO alarms near where I sleep. The CO alarms are important not so much for your boat if it's diesel...but for any gassers nearby that may idle their engines or generator while you snooze. CO can build fast in a small cabin and that's all she wrote.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 10:22 PM   #7
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Man, it's great to know you are ok.

Fire scares the pure-T-shit out of me. So we check and tag our extinguishers every year! Keep spare fuel up on the flybridge and throw all oily rags away. After the McCotters fire, we replace our dual 30A power cords and I check ALL the plugs and connections. However, after my cousin's bad experience with halon gas, we have removed out engine room extinguisher until we can afford a new one. CO alarm in the stateroom with new batteries every DST change. Would like a regular smoke detector too, but never think about it when I should. I will now though.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 10:25 PM   #8
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
Is that the boat we met on during the Seattle Boat Show? Good to hear no body was hurt.

So what alarm is best for over heat batteries? We have 2 smoke alarms in the engine room, and the hylon is right above the batteries and a fire exstenquisher and smoke alarm in every room/area.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 11:03 PM   #9
Guru
 
Woodsong's Avatar
 
City: Atlanta
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,630
For the last 2 boats i have purchased (our trawler and our pilothouse), the first thing I have done is buy all new 9v battery home style fire alarms and place them throughout the boat. A couple in the engine room, one in each stateroom, one in the companion way, main salon, and even behind the electrical panel! It is a very inexpensive way to keep your family and friends safe.
Woodsong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 07:32 AM   #10
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
By law our houses must have smoke alarms but I never considered them for the boat. Domestic battery powered alarms are cheap, and can be sensitive, possibly easily set off when cooking inside,but on balance a good idea.
Anyone have them already? What are your experiences?
BruceK
I have a smoke and a CO detector in my berth area even though the CO detector is not required because my boat is diesel powered. I also have a propane alarm in the galley.

Important - Smoke and CO detectors have a limited life, sometimes as short as three years. Check your documentation and if in doubt, replace them. That "test" button usually only tests the power supply and alarm sounding device, not the function of the detector.

One thing I learned about fire extinguishers during my career is - they should be located in your path of escape. In other words, near the door or hatch. You don't want to move towards or into a fire to get the extinguisher.

The vent in my V berth was described by the surveyor as an "escape hatch". Well, I guess it is.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 07:39 AM   #11
Guru
 
swampu's Avatar


 
City: Biloxi, MS
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cajun Rose
Vessel Model: Biloxi Lugger
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,144
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
Important - Smoke and CO detectors have a limited life, sometimes as short as three years. Check your documentation and if in doubt, replace them. That "test" button usually only tests the power supply and alarm sounding device, not the function of the detector.
My rv sniffer has a test funtion where you push the button and then let the gas from a lighter go into the unit and it beeps. Handy test to make sure it works.
swampu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 08:14 AM   #12
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by swampu View Post
My rv sniffer has a test funtion where you push the button and then let the gas from a lighter go into the unit and it beeps. Handy test to make sure it works.
I had spray cans for testing these things when I was working. I don't know if they are available to the general public.

I constructed a long pole with a remote lever so I could reach ones on high ceilings without a ladder.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 05:29 PM   #13
Guru
 
Arctic Traveller's Avatar


 
City: Juneau Alaska
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Arctic Traveller
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 619
[QUOTE=rwidman;84820]I have a smoke and a CO detector in my berth area even though the CO detector is not required because my boat is diesel powered. I also have a propane alarm in the galley.

Actually, anything that burns a fuel (a propane stove for example) has the potential to emit carbon monoxide. In addition, your dock neighbor might have a gas powered generator running, or be idling his engines and in the process, filling your boat with carbon monoxide. Detectors are very inexpensive life insurance. Make sure to have plenty of them located where you can hear them. Our chief engineer did not hear the smoke alarms, possibly because they were not in his berthing space............Arctic Traveller
__________________
Trawler training and yacht charters at www.arctictraveller.com
Arctic Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 05:31 PM   #14
Guru
 
Arctic Traveller's Avatar


 
City: Juneau Alaska
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Arctic Traveller
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 619
[QUOTE=Phil Fill;84806]Is that the boat we met on during the Seattle Boat Show? Good to hear no body was hurt.

No, it was a different boat, and yes it's a miracle no one was hurt.........Arctic Traveller
__________________
Trawler training and yacht charters at www.arctictraveller.com
Arctic Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2012, 07:17 PM   #15
Guru
 
timjet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,905
A co-worker aboard his recently purchased boat awoke one morning to the smell of smoke. He was in the aft cabin and smoke was rising from the area behind his head. He went outside and yelled fire, went back in side to fight the fire but had great difficultly in finding a fire extinguisher due to the accumulating smoke. All of the fire extinguishers were white and attached to a light colored wall or bulkhead. He finally found one and with the help of a dock mate extinguished the fire that was later determined to be corroded power cables.
__________________
Tim
Tampa Bay
Carver 355 ACMY Twin Cummins Diesels Sold
timjet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 08:32 AM   #16
Guru
 
alormaria's Avatar
 
City: Trenton
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 902
This year's survey required smoke and CO detectors. First time for that.
__________________
Al Johnson
34' Marine Trader
"Angelina"
alormaria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 08:58 PM   #17
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by timjet View Post
A co-worker aboard his recently purchased boat awoke one morning to the smell of smoke. He was in the aft cabin and smoke was rising from the area behind his head. He went outside and yelled fire, went back in side to fight the fire but had great difficultly in finding a fire extinguisher due to the accumulating smoke. All of the fire extinguishers were white and attached to a light colored wall or bulkhead. He finally found one and with the help of a dock mate extinguished the fire that was later determined to be corroded power cables.
It's great that they put out the fire and all are safe, but it's generally best not to go back into a fire unless you have the proper equipment and training.
__________________

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012