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Old 05-27-2016, 12:32 PM   #21
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Learned how to heave a coiled line underhanded in the Boy Scouts, where it was a mandatory skill in Lifesaving. Changed to the overhand throw as an adult when I had the opportunity to have that method demonstrated/taught/practiced. It's all very well to elevate your snoot and say you never heave a line when docking, but that does not eliminate the necessity to know how to effectively heave a line in a seaman-like fashion at some point.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:43 PM   #22
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I generally follow the BoatUS method but whether I toss it overhand/sidearm or underhand depends on the distance to the person I'm throwing it to.


I tell them to stick their right arm out and use that as a target, not their body.
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Old 05-27-2016, 03:09 PM   #23
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I tell them to stick their right arm out and use that as a target, not their body.[/QUOTE]

When my dad was on the sternwheelers on the Yukon they used the
windows of the freight shed as targets until the Old Man stuck his head
out of the wheelhouse and said "All-right boys, that's enough of that".

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Old 05-27-2016, 03:31 PM   #24
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We used to aim for the heads of the guys on the pier...
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Northern Spy: You would have fit in seamlessly on the steamboats I grew up on in New Orleans and St. Louis.
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When my dad was on the sternwheelers on the Yukon they used the
windows of the freight shed as targets...
hmmm... Apparently I missed my calling. Born a generation or two, too late.

Instead of a "Pirate looks at 40", I'm a "Sternwheeler looks at 50".

Anyways my boy works down in the North Harbour. If any of you pull in, I give you permission to aim at him.
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Old 05-27-2016, 04:02 PM   #25
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Yep and no rubber in the monkey's fist. Usually a 3/4" steel nut.
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Old 05-27-2016, 04:31 PM   #26
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Yep and no rubber in the monkey's fist. Usually a 3/4" steel nut.
This came from Electronic Latitude.

...while serving as a line-handler on the yacht Nirvana going through the Panama Canal in late April, she was hit in the eye with a monkey’s fist thrown by one of the Canal workers. It wasn’t something she could have avoided.

“When the guy realized he had overthrown the line with the monkey fist, he gave it a little tug back while it was still in mid-air,” Stout recalls. “At the last second the monkey fist became like the end of a whip and hit me in the eye.”

There are not many regulations to be found on how to restrict weights of heaving lines, but at least the "Code for Safe Working Practices for Merchant Seamen" issued by the UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency, is very clear on this subject. "Vessel’s heaving lines should be constructed with a monkey's fist at one end. To prevent personal injury, the fist should not contain any added weighting material." Obviously that’s not the way they do things in Panama.


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Old 05-27-2016, 04:56 PM   #27
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Here is an interesting video on tossing a line or a rope (I will not mention "dock" or "docking" as this is not the intent of this thread) I do value all opinions/comments wether negative and positive as I think it is a Captain decision to take appropriate action in any sea conditions:
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Old 05-27-2016, 05:14 PM   #28
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Not throw dock lines? I must live in a different world, or perhaps it is the constant 15kt+ winds. Wouldn't think of getting more than half way into the slip without one of the dockhands having a line. Also can't figure out how anyone can med moor without throwing lines.
They are just trying to say that they are better boaters than you or I.

Sometimes I can hand the lines, sometimes I have to toss them.
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Old 05-27-2016, 05:17 PM   #29
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Yeah, after seeing that black eye, better not toss it at the kid. He's of the Tee Ball generation.
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Old 05-27-2016, 05:17 PM   #30
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........... I try really hard not to throw anyone a line. If there's someone on the dock waiting to help, I ask if they wouldn't mind gently guiding me along by the handrails.
Its really easier and safer to use dock lines than rails or the bimini top supports. People don't have to stand as close to the edge or lean out over the water.
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Old 05-27-2016, 06:26 PM   #31
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What, you're not suppose to throw them both ends?
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Old 05-27-2016, 06:29 PM   #32
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29 replies. Most of them berating th OP as an idiot for even asking the question. A few actually answered the question.

I don't have any good techniques that have been taught and practiced. I normally toss a coil in a way that I hope will uncoil in flight. I wouldn't mind reading some techniques and will read the links already given.
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Old 05-27-2016, 06:30 PM   #33
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What, you're not suppose to throw them both ends?
^^^OK...That's funny!
Thanks for lightening up the matter at hand.
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I wouldn't mind reading some techniques and will read the links already given.
That YouTube video in post #27 is pretty good.
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Old 05-27-2016, 07:24 PM   #34
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What, you're not suppose to throw them both ends?
I've been trying to help novice boaters dock and suggested that they throw me a line. Several times, they have done just that; thrown me the entire line, still coiled up.
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Old 05-27-2016, 08:16 PM   #35
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One tip I might pass along. When the situation is critical (high winds) and it is necessary to make sure Bay Pelican does not get blown into the boat sharing the slip, we substitute a 3/8" line for our normal dock lines and thus Deb can toss it easily from a distance. The 3/8" line is attached to a normal dock line which can then be pulled ashore.

I tried to figure out how much sideslip we experience in docking and can't but it is a real issue with the windage we have.
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Old 05-27-2016, 08:33 PM   #36
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When I worked on tugs we took great pride in our ability to nail a cleat or a bit on the dock well before the boat got near it. Often it was simply required, certainly we did encourage and train deckhands to properly throw a line, sometimes pretty big ones. Our deck lines were often 2 inch diameter lines, of course our barge lines were much larger and you don't throw them very far, that's what a heaving line is for. I remember me and another deckape having throwing contests on the back deck on the way to AK., great fun! Our method is simple just grab as many coils of the line depending on size and weight, in the throwing hand, while leaving a fewer amount in the off hand to un coil as it goes out. Remember that the eye on these lines will be anywhere from 4-5 long and that would be thrown as part of the coil. We got pretty good at it.
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Old 05-27-2016, 11:09 PM   #37
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Shorty working a steam operated capstan on the side wheel steamboat President, New Orleans harbor around 1976. Note Heaving lines scattered around his feet. This is on the bow of the President
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Old 05-27-2016, 11:24 PM   #38
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That's a great picture!
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Old 05-27-2016, 11:28 PM   #39
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The Marlinspike Sailor by Hervey Garrett Smith

Source: https://books.google.com/books?id=Ky...hnique&f=false

Dangerous heaving lines article:

http://www.gard.no/web/updates/conte...-heaving-lines

Heaving line : http://ops.d11nuscgaux.info/opsforms/BCB0607.pdf
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Old 05-28-2016, 12:15 AM   #40
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I've numerously observed cruise ships throw light lines to the dock crews, who then pull in the heavy docking lines to secure the ships. Presumably that works for freightors too.... I see nothing wrong in tossing lines, especially toward the first mate who has stepped off the boat and onto the dock. That's what we do. If single-handed, I hold a line when stepping on the dock and continue the process until all lines are secure.
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