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Old 02-23-2019, 10:17 AM   #1
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Exhaust Hose Repair

I am having my fuel tanks on a GB42 replaced and the worker assigned to the removal punctured the exhaust hose with the tip of the Sawzall blade. It's just a small wound and I'm not sure if the hole is thru the hose. The hose is directly behind the tank and I don't ever want to have to remove the tank for a re-repair. Any suggestions on a foolproof repair technique.
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Old 02-23-2019, 11:12 AM   #2
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Can you cut out a six inch section containing the hole and slide in a 10" section of fiberglass tube?
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Old 02-23-2019, 11:18 AM   #3
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Centek makes fiberglass couplings which are sold by chandlers like WM, Defender, Fisheries Supply. Make square cuts on either side of the puncture, slip in the coupler and clamp with T-Bolt clamps, two to a side.

Here is a pic of something similar. In the pic the coupler is between the blue hump hose and the black exhaust hose.
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Old 02-23-2019, 11:22 AM   #4
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Duct tape of course.

See real answers above.
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Old 02-23-2019, 11:26 AM   #5
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Actually if the hose is ten years old or more, this is a good excuse to replace the whole thing.
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Old 02-23-2019, 01:17 PM   #6
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If it is behind the fuel tank and is going to be inaccessible then I would replace it even if it was not damaged. Now is the time to do it.
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Old 02-23-2019, 02:07 PM   #7
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Evelyn,
Plus one on replacing the whole hose. One, if a worker damaged it, it is their responsibility to replace it. Two, since it will be inaccessible after the new tank is installed, all the more reason to replace the entire thing now while it is accessible. What would you do if the "repair" develops a leak and the connections are not readily reached due to the newly replaced tank. Not worth the risk in my opinion. Your boat, your call.
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Old 02-23-2019, 02:28 PM   #8
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Exhaust hose repair

These were all great responses {with the possible exception of the Duct tape or as the guy who did it said "use gorilla tape it'll stick to anything}. Definitely going to change the whole section. Already ordered the tubing and fiberglass connector. Tanks every one for your responses.
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Old 02-23-2019, 02:40 PM   #9
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Put some high temp gasket goop on it, then take a soup can, open it on both ends, make a cut down the side, wrap the soup can around the hose such that the one edge of the slit you've cut slides under the other, and compress the can with several hose clamps.

I repaired a large rip in an exhaust hose this way when I was hours from the nearest harbor, it lasted not only for the rest of the run, but for several cruises after as I waited for the replacement hose.

Luck!

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Old 02-23-2019, 06:55 PM   #10
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Hypothetically speaking, this is the rescue repair to get you home. You know, if you weren't there already. Take it as a newer, improved replacement for duct tape.

https://www.rescuetape.com/


I don't know of a suitable replacement for soup cans.
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Old 02-23-2019, 07:42 PM   #11
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I changed the hose behind the fuel tanks on a GB 42. The hardest part was removing the support clamp. I replaced it with a fiberglass tube and joined it to the original flex tubing some 5 ( maybe more) from the transom. The job went relatively smoothly and was completed in a few hours. The new exhaust tube was supported by clamps for and aft and I used 90 degree and 45 degree fiber glass elbows to make it fit. Each joint has a rubber coupling clamp on it.
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Old 02-23-2019, 09:50 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVELYN B View Post
These were all great responses {with the possible exception of the Duct tape or as the guy who did it said "use gorilla tape it'll stick to anything}. Definitely going to change the whole section. Already ordered the tubing and fiberglass connector. Tanks every one for your responses.
Your original post says you are having the tanks replaced and the assigned worker cut the hose. Doesn`t that mean the Yard providing the assigned worker should be replacing the hose at no cost to you? Mess up, fix up.
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Old 02-24-2019, 11:31 AM   #13
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Used Rescue Tape on two different exhaust hoses...and after years are still in service.
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Old 02-24-2019, 01:34 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ancora View Post
Used Rescue Tape on two different exhaust hoses...and after years are still in service.
As I stated in Post #7, I totally agree with Bruce. If a worker caused the problem (in other words "broke something") they should "make it good", in this case due to many factors would to me mean replacing the entire damaged hose.
Ancora, personally I would not risk possible CO exposure or a sudden failure with hot seawater entering the boat by leaving a "temporary repair" by Rescue Tape as a "permanent" solution. Nothing personal or judgemental meant by my comment, just my opinion.
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Old 03-01-2019, 04:19 PM   #15
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Marine Tech here, if I did that there would be no question whatsoever!! Replace the hose, yes expensive but.... I would never expect any customer of mine having a "repaired" hose due to my error (yes we all make mistakes). Shop should step up and everyone sleep well at night. Happy customers keep me happy!
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Old 03-01-2019, 04:38 PM   #16
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I repaired my exhaust hose and it has been durable.
I used Loctite Black PL Rubber roof flashing polyurethane. You could also use black 5200.
Cleaned hose, coated the hose, then I wrapped with multiple layers of fiberglass drywall tape. Made sure to have it well saturated with the black polurethane rubber. I fixed the end of the hose where it had ripped doing this, and also another hose end that was too thin and wore out. Its been perfect.

If you understand how hoses are made they do the same type idea, it is wrapped with a durable cloth fiber, and saturated with rubber goo.

I would probably fix it for a little slit. I would not cut it and put in a sleeve when you can not get to the clamps as they can break.

The polyurethane rubbers stick very well to rubber hoses
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:58 PM   #17
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When I sold my 1972 GB42 in 2015, it had the original exhaust hoses. This caused quite stir with an insurance surveyor several years prior to the sale of the boat. He was all excited about the fact that the hoses did not have some current USCG stamping in the exterior rubber AND that they were over ten years old. A more experienced surveyor explained to the insurance company that the boat conformed to the standards of the day for when it was built and that the hoses were sound - they still are doing fine with the new owner. Oh, and the tanks in this woodie are also original.

Had I ever replaced the tanks, however, I would have replaced the hoses with updated material, and I recommend you do that.
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Old 03-03-2019, 06:08 AM   #18
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From a professional in the marine engine world...and I agree from my experience..


" ... the typical mode of failure is internal delamination that leads to reduced cross section and loss of structural rigidity. Just like the way a fuel hose might fail imternally and block fuel flow, an exhaust hose can do the same thing. It will eventually fail completely and tear at a fitting or a bend.



Putting a band-aid on the outside of a rotted hose does not fix the rot. If the hose is soft enough to be punctured by the tip of a Sawzall blade it is probably near the end of its useful life."

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Old 03-03-2019, 06:27 AM   #19
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Depends on age hose..... but inaccessible location and sectioned repair on older hose IMO makes replacement best option.
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Old 03-03-2019, 09:43 AM   #20
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Recently hauled my 1982 mainship 34. I was curious on how far barnacles would extend up the exhaust hose, so stuck my arm up there.. Certainly glad I did as the hose had started delaminating to the point of blocking the exhaust up to 1/3 the area and would have sunk the boat if it had ruptured.
I assume the hose was original to the boat and had remarked before that the hose looked like new but that was only what I saw near the engine. The part at the transom that sat constantly in water was rotten.
It was a bear to remove and replace but glad I caught it when I did!
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