Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-02-2014, 07:58 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Salt Lake City, UT
Vessel Name: Kia Orana
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 35
Ever wish the boat was smaller?

I am looking for input. Do you ever wish you had bought a smaller boat? Do you ever wish for a less complex boat? My wife prefers smaller. We have 2 adult children and expect grandkids in the future. She is concerned about slip availability. She is concerned about the ability to maneuver in marinas and get into out of the way anchorages. Our last boat was a 30' twin engine. We have chartered a Bayliner 4788, a 48' Californian and a bunch of sailboats (various sizes) with no problems at all. We initially plan to use the boat on the west coast and PNW for 4-5 years then possibly truck it to the great loop for a multi year adventure there. I am kind of a buy and hold guy. I like to buy something nice and take care of it in a pride of ownership way. We have done a fair amount of looking at different boats, styles and sizes. We have kind of settled on a Bayliner 45/47 layout (my preference and truckable) or "Europa" type layout like a Mainship 40 (her preference because of smaller size, also truckable but more complicated) She really likes the Nordic Tug 37 with flybridge but its too pricey and I think it is too small. We both want a boat that will run well at trawler speeds but have the ability to pick up speed if need be. Care to share your thoughts?
__________________
Advertisement

woodsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 08:11 PM   #2
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
No, not ever. a boat may seem complex dorm the beginning but the key is to spend time digging and playing with all the various systems to get a feel and idea what they do. N4712 seemed complex from the start but after messing with the various systems and digging through wire and just studying everything I could tell you where every hose/wire/conduit/etc goes and connects to. It's just a matter of time. IMHO. BTW Welcome aboard!
__________________

__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 08:14 PM   #3
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,996
Greetings,
Welcome aboard.

__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 08:19 PM   #4
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,714
Sure ...

Every time I pay my moorage.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 09:08 PM   #5
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,916
I'm sure I could get there...but on my budgets...never. Each and every liveaboard could have been a few feet longer or have a few upgrades to pretty old systems.

Then again...my thoughts have been always buy smaller less complex than you think you need...except if you liveaboard or are retired and really planning on using the boat.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 10:24 PM   #6
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodsea View Post
We have done a fair amount of looking at different boats, styles and sizes. We have kind of settled on a Bayliner 45/47 layout (my preference and truckable) or "Europa" type layout like a Mainship 40 (her preference because of smaller size, also truckable but more complicated) She really likes the Nordic Tug 37 with flybridge but its too pricey and I think it is too small. We both want a boat that will run well at trawler speeds but have the ability to pick up speed if need be. Care to share your thoughts?
Yes, the Bayliner 47 is a fantastic boat for what you are planning, but I'm biased.

I am in the exact same situation. I bought my 4788 to cruise, and have outfitted it for independant operation.

It is not the perfect boat for anything. but it is very good at almost everything you could ask of a coastal cruiser.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 10:29 PM   #7
Guru
 
bligh's Avatar
 
City: Santa Cruz, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Frisky
Vessel Model: 99 Nordic Tug
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,097
Only at the fuel dock!
bligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 10:48 PM   #8
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by bligh View Post
Only at the fuel dock!
That's why you get a "Trawler".
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 11:42 PM   #9
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by N4712 View Post
That's why you get a "Trawler".
At six knots, one can get something like 4 miles per gallon ("your mileage may vary").
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 12:02 AM   #10
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
At six knots, one can get something like 4 miles per gallon ("your mileage may vary").
Yes, we get 3NMPG at 6 1/4 kts, if memory serves.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 02:16 AM   #11
Guru
 
Tidahapah's Avatar
 
City: Mooloolaba
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Tidahapah
Vessel Model: Bert Ellis Timber motor cruiser
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,779
The only times I have ever thought that it would be nice if it was smaller is when I am anti fouling the bottom.
As soon as I am back at sea and 100 mile off the coast I some times wish it was bigger but never smaller.
all in all I am very happy with the boat I have.
cheers
Benn
__________________
"When I die I hope my wife doesn't sell my toys for what I told her I paid for them"
Money: It's made round to go round , not flat to stack.
"Get out and do it"
Tidahapah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 03:13 AM   #12
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
To answer the OP, no, we never do. But that really has no benefit to you as we all use boats differently and have different likes and dislikes.

Larger is more comfortable. Generally more sea worthy

However, larger may use more fuel and will definitely be more expensive to dock. You mentioned shipping and obviously the larger would be more expensive to transport.

As to handling. I don't really think within the range of sizes you're considering it's a major consideration. Docking isn't much different. Yes the smaller size will fit more places but in docking it may actually be easier as it's not blown as quickly or harshly.

But it's your intended use, and what you're comfortable with. If we only used the boat a few times a year, never stayed on it, used it on lakes or protected waters, we'd go smaller.

At the other extreme if we were going to live aboard and cruise heavily we'd go larger.

As you look think of what you like about each boat, but also think about what you don't like and what things could be deal breakers. For one person twin engines or single engines might kill the deal, for another it might be the size of the galley or whether it's up or down. For us, if we were going to cruise and spend nights, a flybridge is essential on our list as it increases the usable space and the outdoors. It's like adding 10 or 15' because that's what you're doing. But if you face height clearance issues, then that's a problem. For the loop make sure it comes in under 19'1".

Actually your list of negatives, of deal killers will help to narrow things considerably.

We cruise a lot, spend a lot of time on a boat, and we want space. But that isn't you. You have to decide the keys to you.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 08:07 AM   #13
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Is that anything like wishing my privates were smaller?
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 08:21 AM   #14
Guru
 
hollywood8118's Avatar
 
City: Port Townsend Washington
Country: USA
Vessel Name: " OTTER "
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander Europa 40
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,482



nope!

HOLLYWOOD
hollywood8118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 08:41 AM   #15
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
No, not smaller. Not a lot bigger either, but who doesn't wish they had a foot more here and a foot more there?

Any boat is a compromise. Find what works for you.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 10:52 AM   #16
Veteran Member
 
City: Salt Lake City, UT
Vessel Name: Kia Orana
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 35
Thanks for the input! Part of her trepidation comes from some feedback we got at an AGLCA rendezvous we attended. Two people told her to get the smallest boat that she could be comfortable on. They felt that a 45-50' boat would limit where you could go/stay. One of her other points is guests are only on the boat 10-20% of the time. During those times we can just make other arrangements like stay in a marina with a hotel close by. That seems awe fully limiting to me.
woodsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 11:01 AM   #17
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
As a live aboard no as it has all the comforts of a land home. Away from the dock again no, as it has the displacement, stability, tanks and range for any type of cruising we might do. Arriving and departing form the dock, - some times as docking a 58 ft and 40+ tons can be daunting and a hell of a pucker factor. Finding moorage and cost, yes as slips for a 60 ft are limited and costly. So over all NO.

Most winters require one to two weeks with no water, sanitation and some time days with no power. The Eagle has 400 gallons of water, 50 gallon sanitation tank, two gen sets, a Webasto diesel boiler heating with 600 gallons of fuel. So we can be self sustaining for maybe up to one month down to 0 F with the marina frozen solid.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 11:01 AM   #18
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodsea View Post
Do you ever wish you had bought a smaller boat?
No, never. What a silly thought. Now faster, that is a different question.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 11:14 AM   #19
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodsea View Post
..... people told her to get the smallest boat that she could be comfortable on. They felt that a 45-50' boat would limit where you could go/stay. ...guests are only on the boat 10-20% of the time......
Add to that the fact that slip fees and haul-outs are by the foot. I assume that money is not an issue or you wouldn't be looking for a 45-50' boat. So, lets get past here and look at why you should get what you think you need.

If you are going to do a lot of boating especially over-nighters, then generally bigger is better. I was originally was looking at 42-44 footers. Every time we looked at one, I would ask the admiral if you would like driving it she would reluctantly say "yes, no problem". Then we remembered looking at a 36 footer once and she kept bringing it up. I finally realized that she was intimidated by the larger boats. So, we bought a 36 footer. It would have been nicer to get a larger boat but the 36 is fine for our needs. So far we have come almost 600 miles form our origin in a really bad winter and all is still good. So in my particular case it worked out great which does not mean it would for you.

Buying a boat is a major ordeal. Both parties have to be happy with it. Since you have already chartered larger boats, your decision making should be easier because you have both experienced them. I am just relating my particular experience which is relevant to only me and the admiral. Your decision should be made by both of you and don't put too much into the advise of others. Unless you know some of these people really well, you might be taking advise from dock queens or from those that cant afford bigger. Listen to all, but go with your own instincts.
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 11:41 AM   #20
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,714
I was shopping for a little bigger boat a while back but now that I'm not in the land of cheap federally provided moorage I'll just keep my little 30' boat. Even though I do like long and narrow now I'd rather my 10.5' wide Willard was 12' wide. But Willy isn't really narrow as is.

Relative to size I'd like to have the wide body Willard ... the Voyager. Look how much space is lost (pics) w those side decks.

Another thought is that if I had a boat that was 100% OK being left out on the weather I could get a 36'. There was a 36' boat both Chris and I really liked.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	all to 12-15-09 421 copy.jpg
Views:	79
Size:	191.4 KB
ID:	27869   Click image for larger version

Name:	all to 12-15-09 426 copy 3.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	122.5 KB
ID:	27870  
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012