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Old 03-03-2014, 11:56 AM   #21
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Thanks for the input! Part of her trepidation comes from some feedback we got at an AGLCA rendezvous we attended. Two people told her to get the smallest boat that she could be comfortable on. They felt that a 45-50' boat would limit where you could go/stay. One of her other points is guests are only on the boat 10-20% of the time. During those times we can just make other arrangements like stay in a marina with a hotel close by. That seems awe fully limiting to me.
That is always interesting to hear those with various sized boats talk about the difficulty in where you can go and stay. Up to the 50 and 60 foot ranges, that just isn't an issue as long as your draft isn't excessive. What you have to pay is but not where you can do it. Funny thing is 35' owners warn against going over 40', 55' owners warn against going over 60', 60' owners warn against 80' and 80' owners warn against 100'. Yes, at each level a few marinas fall by the wayside but most areas have one larger marina with greater capability and at 50' boat just isn't going to limit you.
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Old 03-03-2014, 12:16 PM   #22
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Thanks for the input! Part of her trepidation comes from some feedback we got at an AGLCA rendezvous we attended. Two people told her to get the smallest boat that she could be comfortable on. They felt that a 45-50' boat would limit where you could go/stay. One of her other points is guests are only on the boat 10-20% of the time. During those times we can just make other arrangements like stay in a marina with a hotel close by. That seems awe fully limiting to me.
I'm planning on doing the loop in a couple of years and had that in mind when purchasing this boat. Regarding size, draft (full fuel, water, and all that crap you're bringing & the crap you will buy along the way) and air draft (bridge clearance with or without a mast and other removable items on top) are likely bigger constraints than LOA and Beam. Regarding guests, I have friends (know that's hard to believe) who might join us for a few days to a week. Cruising with friends for a long weekend is great fun........ as long as you aren't constantly rubbing elbows.

Ted
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Old 03-03-2014, 12:21 PM   #23
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Relative to size I'd like to have the wide body Willard ... the Voyager. Look how much space is lost (pics) w those side decks.
Tankage is under my decks, so there is little loss of living room. Love my wide 360-degree decks. (I don't want a smaller boat.)

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Old 03-03-2014, 12:26 PM   #24
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It seems here on the east coast, the 40-50 foot range is the most popular. Enough room for two long term, can be single-handed somewhat, not too expensive to operate and maintain.

Boats bigger than that seem to be purchased to support egos. Lots of these seem to sit, being such a PITA to get under way and operate.

I've cruised long term on my 38x(kinda skinny)12'. Two can be comfortable for long term coastal cruising with stops every few days, up to a week, to replenish. Cruised a week with four and that was crowded.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:01 PM   #25
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Thanks for the input! Part of her trepidation comes from some feedback we got at an AGLCA rendezvous we attended. Two people told her to get the smallest boat that she could be comfortable on. They felt that a 45-50' boat would limit where you could go/stay. One of her other points is guests are only on the boat 10-20% of the time. During those times we can just make other arrangements like stay in a marina with a hotel close by. That seems awe fully limiting to me.

I think I'd counter that with a suggestion to get the biggest boat that you're comfortable with that will do The Loop.

That's a long time to spend with little elbow room, in each other's face all the time... since even wonderful relationships often benefit from some quiet time.

A secondary suggestion is to have the most minimal guest accommodations as possible, if you need them at all.

And it's also slightly possible that the larger boat without too many additional systems just may give you better access to maintain or repair/replace stuff as necessary.

FWIW, or boat is nominally 42' but we carry a dinghy aft so our true LOA is about 49' -- and finding slips has not been a problem.

Now about that cost thing... well, can't advise, there.

-Chris
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:04 PM   #26
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It seems here on the east coast, the 40-50 foot range is the most popular. Enough room for two long term, can be single-handed somewhat, not too expensive to operate and maintain.

Boats bigger than that seem to be purchased to support egos. Lots of these seem to sit, being such a PITA to get under way and operate.

I've cruised long term on my 38x(kinda skinny)12'. Two can be comfortable for long term coastal cruising with stops every few days, up to a week, to replenish. Cruised a week with four and that was crowded.
While there are some larger boats purchased for ego purposes and sitting, I think there is a much more common problem often overlooked. Many are purchased with intent of use and because the purchaser really desires using them. However, they're purchased by those still working, often executives as you get larger. And, then it speaks directly to our lifestyle and business expectations in this country. Executives and managers in business don't get much time off. They work weekends. They cut vacations short. They don't get extended time. And just making time to use the boat becomes difficult plus by that point they're tired and not willing to go through much effort to do anything. And if you seldom use the boat and it is just sitting, then each trip will be less fun as you'll arrive and have to deal with the issues of non-use. We work the most days and hours per year of any major country.

So, as you look at the boats sitting unused, consider for a moment that there may be other reasons than what you suspected.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:32 PM   #27
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While there are some larger boats purchased for ego purposes and sitting, I think there is a much more common problem often overlooked. Many are purchased with intent of use and because the purchaser really desires using them. However, they're purchased by those still working, often executives as you get larger. And, then it speaks directly to our lifestyle and business expectations in this country. Executives and managers in business don't get much time off. They work weekends. They cut vacations short. They don't get extended time. And just making time to use the boat becomes difficult plus by that point they're tired and not willing to go through much effort to do anything. And if you seldom use the boat and it is just sitting, then each trip will be less fun as you'll arrive and have to deal with the issues of non-use. We work the most days and hours per year of any major country.

So, as you look at the boats sitting unused, consider for a moment that there may be other reasons than what you suspected.
Great post!!!

People that have funds to buy things like large boats typically earn that money through long hours at the office!
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:41 PM   #28
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We went from 54 to 36. I like the smaller sized boat most of the time, except when I have to go into the engine room--I just don't crouch and turn like I used to
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:58 PM   #29
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I do think Skipper Bob's maxime for buying a full time cruiser(and really any boat for that matter) is one of the best n boating: "Don't buy the biggest boat you can afford, buy the biggest boat you can be comfortable in". That is a very personal decision. We came to after having chartered many different sizes and configurations over the course of several years. "Comfortable" covers more than creature comforts: operating and servicing ergonomics, sea keeping capability, etc, all laid against the base line of the crew's skill levels and seamanship. What proved wonderful and perfect for us would not be perfect for many people on a number of different counts. Now that we are done with the full time cruising and living aboard, and only want something for weekend day beach trips and puttering around, our beloved 13' Whaler (former dinghy) fits the bill, but will likely be stepped up to something in the low 20's once we have done our land-based adventures over the next 2 or 3 years.
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:56 PM   #30
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I am looking for input. Do you ever wish you had bought a smaller boat?

Do you ever wish for a less complex boat?
Nope,

and nope.

I like small and simple, and that is what I have.
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Old 03-03-2014, 03:50 PM   #31
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I would modify Skipper Bob's mantra to say "Don't buy the biggest boat you can afford, buy the smallest boat you can live on". I think it's a whole different attitude. This is how we ended up with a 36' boat that meets our needs. The hard part is to truly separate wants from needs. Once you can honestly agree on that, the boat decision is much easier. Get a boat that fits you, not somebody else. Enjoy the ride.
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Old 03-03-2014, 04:55 PM   #32
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For most boaters there are 3 key elements in the decision making process. What I want, what I need, and what I can afford. Rarely do the 3 align themselves except for the fortunate few.
For those like the OP that have chartered before and owned a 30 footer, the decision making becomes easier. They should pretty much know what they want and possibly what they actually need. That leaves them with the 'what they can afford'. If you like/want a 45-50 footer and you can afford it, don't let someone else change you mind especially if they never owned a boat in the 45-50' range and have never downsized. When I use the expression "you" I am referring to a joint decision between you personally and your SO.
Incidentally, a "joint" decision is now becoming legal in many states.
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Old 03-03-2014, 05:43 PM   #33
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Interesting thread, but the question is somewhat of a conundrum for us. We have a 36 ft. boat that we're happy with....no elbow rubbing, even in the galley for the most part. But the puzzle appears when we think about moving up in size, the cubic space of our 36 is huge, and we'd have to go 42' or more to gain much. We have actually considered stretching out boat to 40, so wishing it was smaller hasn't been a cosideration, save for the times when a hurricane was threatening us from the Atlantic.
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Old 03-03-2014, 09:01 PM   #34
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One thing I'd add. Someone said or implied having a guest cabin wasn't important for the small amount of use, to put the guests in a hotel. That means you're tied the entire time to that or other hotels. So now you can't really take your guests on your normal cruise to enjoy what you enjoy with you. Now, I'm not saying you need a huge amount of cabin space, but also saying that one of the greatest pleasures of cruising is when guests join for a short period.
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Old 03-03-2014, 09:55 PM   #35
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[QUOTE=woodsea;217185] Do you ever wish you had bought a smaller boat?


I don't think that's possible
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Old 03-03-2014, 10:01 PM   #36
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One thing I'd add. Someone said or implied having a guest cabin wasn't important for the small amount of use, to put the guests in a hotel. That means you're tied the entire time to that or other hotels. So now you can't really take your guests on your normal cruise to enjoy what you enjoy with you. Now, I'm not saying you need a huge amount of cabin space, but also saying that one of the greatest pleasures of cruising is when guests join for a short period.
Yes, the operative word is short.
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Old 03-03-2014, 10:43 PM   #37
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Greetings,
Short?
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Old 03-03-2014, 10:48 PM   #38
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There were somethings I really liked about my little Pilot 34. It was great on fuel even with a good turn of speed. The simplicity of a single engine was a big plus. The full keel was nice to have. However, I do enjoy the comfort of my 42. It's kind of like the "Perfect Trawler" thread. There are many perfect trawlers as the one that fits your needs is perfect for you. Then again there is no one perfect trawler for everyone.
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:06 PM   #39
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Marvelous posts!!
Interesting thread, but the question is which gun and anchor will I strip from the bigger boat to use on the smaller? Gotta run with a little humor here.
I think if you scan the replys you see consisent NO! reply for boats in the 35-42' range, 42-50' range most will be a conditional NO, a few bracketing or qualifing their reply with conditions of use etc.

I havent seen it mentioned here yet but, especially if live-a-board, it is nice have space enough for when communications breakdown with the "Chief", comfortable seperation is sometimes desirable! A cot in the ER is not acceptable. Just trying to provide the best preparation for others here! Also Keep the statreroms limited to two , smaller guest lists that way.
From personal experience, saved and looked for ten years for the ultimate 48-50', visited the "tanked" market again last year and ended up with bigger. Now the challenges, 50' is the breakover, finding slips, dockage, boathouse, for larger is a PITA . Would I give it up? Naw- not till the $ supply dictates so. But I am getting tired of the assumption that I am a rock star or something when paying at the register. I see the letdown in their faces when I must inform them I am nothing but a wage-earner fulfilling a lifes dream simply dressed in a Phil Collins disguise!!

Ah for all you doubters from the begin of the post, wouldn't advise to go without the Forfjord and follow the advise of the great Jack O'Connor the .270 is the choice for all non-dangerous North American! But now if you are only hunting halibut .357 works great. But for sakes do hand out ear-plugs first,it's really-reallyloud!
Cheers to all.
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:46 PM   #40
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Was told by many the perfect boat for weekend warriors like us drank six, fed four and slept two. Down to one kiddo now and he fits nicely on the fold down. Our vberth is plenty comfortable for us. Only negative thing we've found so far is we'll never buy another boat without a stern door. Aside from that, Bliss.

In the future if the right boat comes along we may trade up a little, but not much. We've found everything we need to enjoy a very pleasant weekend on the water in under 30'.
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