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Old 06-28-2014, 11:54 AM   #21
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City: Tuckerton, NJ
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When I did the sea trial on my Gulfstar I was purchasing a vessel that sat for 4 years. Step 1 was to contact a tank and fuel polishing company. The top plate on the tank was removed, the dip tubes were removed and cleaned, the tank was cleaned and they were able to visually inspect most of the tank because the plate was removed. It was determined that the fuel was no longer fuel I'd want to run in any diesel engine. 180 gallons were removed and properly disposed of by the tank cleaning vendor. About 50 gallons of fresh fuel was delivered to the boat for the sea trial.
Step 2 hire a Perkins certified diesel mechanic to ready the engines from their 4 year nap. All fuel filters were removed and replaced. All coolant was removed and replaced. All 3 engines (2) 4-154M's and the Westerbeeke 3 cylinder diesel had new oil and oil filters replaced. The previous owners had replaced 95% of the older hoses and V belts 4 years ago. I ended up having to replace 1 alternator belt and the main fuel fill and the tank's vent line. They were cracked and showing signs of their age.
Step 3 repair the Genset it wouldn't start it would try and then stall. This ended up being a bad oil pressure sender. It was replaced the generator now starts immediately and doesn't have excessive smoke.
Step 4 rebuild all the Sherwood raw water pumps. The original owners had replaced all the raw water pumps with Sherwood pumps about 6 years ago. The impellers were changed on all 3 engines. All fresh water strainer filters were inspected and cleaned.
Step 5 after the engines were started check temperatures with an IR gun and compare them to the gauges. All 3 engines were within spec after we ran the boat for about 10 minutes. The WOT run was done by the broker for a period of time between 8 to 10 minutes, I wasn't happy about this and the engines were backed down to normal cruising speeds. There was some black smoke for about a minute or two then it cleared up. Both Perkins engines started almost immediately and there was very little visible smoke. She fired right away and considering the time of layup I was surprised how little smoke appeared. The raw water flow was excellent. The engines are original and have about 2,000 hours on them. The Genset was replaced about 8 years ago. All engines showed good oil pressure well within limits towards the higher end of the accepted levels.
Step 6 the boats been on the hard since the sea trial. It's having the rudder blistering issue resolved, the rudders were removed and new rudder bearings were installed along with the glass repairs. I had the boat's hull or bottom anti foul painted black. A few minor repairs were done before the new black bottom was painted.
Right now the marina is performing some minor repairs stuff I would normally handle but given the distance and my current workload it's better the marina do these repairs in preparation for launching her either late this week or after the 4th of July.
I was fortunate that I had owners that would allow me to do this work based on a fairly low ball offer and a contract contingent on a satisfactory sea trial and survey.
Yes I spent money most would prefer to spends after they own a vessel not before the sale went through. In the end this seems to have worked out well for me because there are very few unknowns for a boat that's almost 40 years old.
Bill
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Old 06-28-2014, 01:21 PM   #22
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Most of the engine's are run at a gentle 1500 or similar cruising speed. Whilst it may feel good to be 'kind' to the engine what in fact is happening is that because the engine doesn't reach it's correct operating temperature a tiny portion of fuel is unburnt and is put into the exhaust system and creates a black oily coating on the inside of the exhaust manifold and piping. When the engine is gently opened up to WOT (monitoring for any overheating) the engine gets up to full temperature and the unburnt fuel coating also begins to heat up and starts to smoke. As the engine runs hard this oily coating will be burnt off and show itself as blue smoke, when the exhaust system is clean the smoke will clear and the engine will run sweet.
Older two stroke engines were very susceptible to this with a significant drop in performance until they become so poor that action is required either in the form of a costly strip down or, fill the tank with a 50/50 mix of Parrafin and diesel, as Parrafin burns hotter this helps the cleaning, the engine is run up under load (just like your Lehman) and run hard until it runs clear.
What is very important during this exercise, as stated previously, is that the engine is allowed to cool down naturally by letting the engine tickover until the temperature drops to around 70' Celsius to relief thermal stressing.
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Old 06-28-2014, 04:01 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by gonesailing13 View Post
Sorry I should have given a little more info . Ford Lehman 2715E
120 hp
6000 hrs
not sure about maintenance

Not sure how many angels dance on the head of a pin. Must be a trick question.
Let's assume it was well maintained with meticulous records of service. If you're older than 50...... it will outlive you. 6,000 hours is nothing for a Ford Lehman engine that has been well maintained.

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Old 06-28-2014, 10:28 PM   #24
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Just as a matter of interest and to put things in perspective we have engines in trucks in the family business, Scania, Iveco and Mercedes and 500,000 miles is normal and apart from normal servicing and things like starters and alternators and we had a Mercedes that exceeded a million miles which worked between Ireland, Sweden as far South as Greece before we traded it so I wouldn't worry about a few hours on the Ford.
The secret is in the servicing, top quality oil and filters, on time every time.
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Old 06-29-2014, 01:38 AM   #25
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Isn`t another factor in engine life the frequency or otherwise of cold starts. Viz the life of the taxi engine which, despite the usual driver abuse, way exceeds the same engine in the same family car, because the taxi works near 24/7 with multiple drivers, and never gets cold. Much like Irish Rambler`s 1M mile Merc truck. Real "trawlers", and charter/hire boats, achieve high hours too.
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Old 06-29-2014, 02:11 AM   #26
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Isn`t another factor in engine life the frequency or otherwise of cold starts. Viz the life of the taxi engine which, despite the usual driver abuse, way exceeds the same engine in the same family car, because the taxi works near 24/7 with multiple drivers, and never gets cold. Much like Irish Rambler`s 1M mile Merc truck. Real "trawlers", and charter/hire boats, achieve high hours too.
That's one of the benefits of equipping block heaters and using them in all but the heat of summer. And some guys even use them then. As noted above, using your engines and religious maintenance is best of all.
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Old 06-29-2014, 12:14 PM   #27
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Some people say that a guideline might be how much fuel has gone through it, slowly for many hours, or quickly for not many. It really depends upon how it has been treated.
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Old 06-29-2014, 12:37 PM   #28
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I wonder how much you have to discount to sell a very good condition 25 to 30 year old trawler with a great running FL 120 with over 6,000 hours , how about 7,500 or more?
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Old 06-29-2014, 01:05 PM   #29
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The reason the taxi engine's and trucks do big miles as was mentioned in an earlier posts is because when an engine starts from cold the during the warming up period the engine produces sulphuric acid.
This is the reason you are advised to drive off under light load to help pass this phase and not let the engine tickover to get warm, same with a boat, drive off gently until it's warm or if you want to charge batteries from the main engine secure your boat firmly to the dock and put it in gear to around 1,000 rpm to help it warm up quickly, it also helps to burn all the fuel injected because if it runs to cold any unburnt fuel washes the lube oil of the cylinder walls and accelerates engine wear.
If you dip a little oil on your finger tip to taste it will taste acidic if the oil is overdue for changing for this reason.
Many police cars in America are left running 24/7 and an exhaust will last for years as there's no sulphuric acid getting into the mild steel exhaust system.
I hope this explanation helps.
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