Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-20-2016, 02:58 PM   #21
Guru
 
Hawgwash's Avatar
 
City: Sidney
Country: Canada
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by No Mast;
We check:
Alternators
Oil pan
Coolant tank
Stab. Hydraulic tank
Valve cover
Heat exchanger
After cooler
Drip less seal
Exhaust riser
What IR do you have and at what distance does it lose reliable accuracy?
__________________
Advertisement

Hawgwash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 03:12 PM   #22
Guru
 
mbevins's Avatar
 
City: Windsor
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Keeper IV
Vessel Model: 44 Viking ACMY
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Like others we visually check things before startup.

After that, we rely on sensors.

We of course keep track of the common ones like coolant temp and oil pressure, but we have more.

[*]Boost and pyro gauges (pyro will tell of a cooling issue long before coolant temp)[*]Fuel consumption (found a broken rigid fuel line with this that could have resulted in a fire I suppose)[*]Engine room smoke detector[*]Engine room temperature[*]Engine room camera


Plus I use my ears. I know what my boat sounds like, and anything amis is quickly noticed.
I'm with you with the exception of the extras that you have added of late. Getting into my ER is a huge pain. I have to roll up a pc of carpet in the saloon.
I'm very anal about monitoring gauges every 5-7minutes on average.
I caught an oil leak last fall just by seeing a slight drop in pressure.
__________________

__________________
"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."

mbevins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 03:17 PM   #23
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post

If I couldn't easily peek or operated a vessel that was fast enough I would have to slow to leave the helm...a camera would be high on my to do list.
We do thorough checks before leaving the dock working from a check list. We service regularly and thoroughly. We also have more than the standard guages and instrumentation to monitor things. Still, every hour, someone does a visual check and on a boat without a full stand up ER or even areas of one with, cameras are invaluable (and with audio even better). We don't use them to replace checks in person but to augment them. Most things that can go wrong have very early warning signs. Water in the bilge but not to the level of setting off an alarm yet. Other fluid in the bilge or on the exterior of the engine or hoses. Fuel filters starting to show signs of something. Belts just a little loose. A strange sound coming from somewhere.

Cameras have become so inexpensive that we're of the philosophy, the more the better. For security. For docking. For keeping an eye on the engine room. I think it's one of those things that has snuck up on us, both the view they can give you and the modest cost. They also are of tremendous help if an alarm goes off in allowing you to quickly see the area and know what you're dealing with as you head down.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 03:57 PM   #24
Guru
 
kchace's Avatar
 
City: Brookline, NH
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Blue Heaven
Vessel Model: Albin 43 classic double cabin, twin 135 Lehmans
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 761
I don't *think* I'm anal, but before a long cruise I'll make sure fluid levels are good, check belts,etc. after maybe an hour or 2 into the cruise I'll actually go down and sit in the ER for a bit. From there I can listen to make sure the engines sound right, check all strainers, look for leaks and check that the stuffing boxes are dripping properly. I might hit a few spots with the temp gun. Every few hours after I do about the same check. I'd love to get an ER camera. After I get my new electronics set up (this spring) I'll look into it further.

Ken
kchace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 04:30 PM   #25
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Portage_Bay View Post
In addition to gauges, sight and sound don't forget smell. I've caught before major problems overheated electrical, an engine running to hot, a fuel leak and scariest of all the gen set oil filter gasket had developed a pin hole leak and was spraying oil on the Maine's turbo.
Yes indeed! I discovered a suddenly leaky fuel pump, and a chafing power cable to one of the air-cons that way.

With the IR gun I checked the oil filter (engine and transmission), the shaft packing gland, the coolant temps coming out of the heat exchanger, the alternator, the exhaust before and after the shower head.

I also checked the mechanical gauges that were in there for engine temp, oil pressure, and drive oil pressure/ plus the fuel filter vacuum and pressure and the pressure and temp gauges on the Naiads.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 04:38 PM   #26
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,195
Another big +1 for the ER cameras. I keep a regular eye on the cams that are wired to the HDTV. A simple selector button allows me to change cameras for a view of each engine. I might add more cameras for added perspectives.



They don't replace the need for ER checks, but I find that I do the ER check less often as I can easily see the engines now. I still like a pre- and post- ER check to confirm fluid levels and general conditions.

ER Lights on:



ER Lights off:

__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 04:43 PM   #27
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,824
I do pre and post cruise checks. The pre is like everybody else's looking for leaks and fluid levels. The post is for smells and smoke. If you open the hatch with the engine room vent running, the odors are contained in the ER. I'm looking for oil haze, coolant odor, burnt rubber (hoses and belts) smell, and diesel fuel odor. Many of these can be gone or less noticeable by the next morning.

Underway for only a few hours, I'm probably not doing an engine room check.

All day cruise, I try to do a check every 3 hours. Engine for leaks, belts, drip pan under engine, coolant reservoir, sea water strainer, and the Racor (fuel separator) are mostly what I check. I have an IR temp gun that I may or may not use. I cruise solo much of the time. So there are places where it's not realistic to do ER checks. I'm also an opportunist. If I'm waiting for a lock, bridge or other navigation blockage, time for a quick check.

I think ER checks are good but one can take anything to extreme (I've been known to). I would rather be more OCD about preventative maintenance than ER checks. Never did one on any aircraft while I was flying it.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 04:57 PM   #28
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,890
The thing about ER checks and monitoring gauges is that things can go from all-ok to bad in a matter of minutes if not seconds. Some failures give hints, but not all. Chances of catching something during the check is pretty low.

For that reason I put good effort in keeping machinery in top shape, and having a good alarm system monitoring four points on the engine.

And I still do the checks!!
Ski in NC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 05:36 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Old deckhand's Avatar
 
City: Sitka
Country: Same
Vessel Model: Transpacific Marine Eagle 32
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 497
I wait until the "check engine" light comes on. That is what it is for, right?
Old deckhand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 06:04 PM   #30
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old deckhand View Post
I wait until the "check engine" light comes on. That is what it is for, right?
Is it yellow or red?
menzies is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 06:07 PM   #31
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,997
Greetings,
Admiral does ER checks every 2 hours or so and records temps/pressures as well as a visual overview.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 08:47 PM   #32
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Have some of it.



That's not including JD's idiot lights.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:02 PM   #33
Guru


 
City: Full-time onboard
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Trawler
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 937
We have an automatic hourly timer. Every hour, we take turns going into the engine room and checking visually, apart from video, sounds, etc. When I go into the ER, I make individual temperature measurements on 6 points and inspect around the engines, measure fuel, feel 4-5 bilge points for water, and touch the spinning shafts (laser temp doesn't work well with the shiny surface).

For the first 7 years, I recorded the temperature measurements and had a checkoff list that was recorded in a database. Starting 6 years ago, I stopped doing the recording because I could easily see any trends and understood the temperatures seen within a degree.

I have found multiple minor issues over the year that easily could have turned into real problems. I couldn't imagine watching 60+ minutes go by without the timer going off. If that's anal, I'm happy to wear the label. I just think it's the smart thing to do.
Jeffrey S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:11 PM   #34
Guru
 
No Mast's Avatar
 
City: Atlantic Highlands, NJ
Country: US
Vessel Name: Moana Huaka'i
Vessel Model: Selene 53
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwash View Post
What IR do you have and at what distance does it lose reliable accuracy?

We have a fluke 62. I think it's a max + but not positive. After 3 or 4 ft the "window" it reads becomes to large to focus on the specific component being measured generally.
No Mast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:22 PM   #35
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffrey S View Post
We have an automatic hourly timer. Every hour, we take turns going into the engine room and checking visually, apart from video, sounds, etc.
Gee whiz. Is your helm position very distant from the engine room that you can't hear what's happening there? My boat is small enough (helm is above the engine compartment), that I'd hear any unusual sounds. That's not counting engine sensors. Presume you've sufficient crew to have a knowledgeable person to spare to inspect the engine compartment hourly. ... Strange, I have no compulsion to inspect my automobile's engine hourly, nor my boat's engine compartment on an hourly basis.

If marine engines are expected to fail within any hour, I wouldn't see boating as an enjoyable past time. If it was a commercial business with several thousand persons aboard, I could understand.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:31 PM   #36
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
Funny....hundreds of sunk boats I have been involved with from fire and fkooding....and nobody heard a thing till it was too late.

I agree with Ski that a second after an engine room check you can have a severe emergency develope.

But I also know from experience catching things early are often solvable and dealt with in a better p,ace much of the time than when they become full blown.

He is also correct that if everything is well mainrained...thousands of hours and many miles will be covered without issue...till the time it does happen.....even brand new equipment can fail minutes after installed (and actually often does).

As I posted before....for me it is a 15 second issue to do a check.....for some boats it is so painful or dangerous...remote sensors may be the best you get.

So place your bets and roll your dice...
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:37 PM   #37
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Average 125 hours engine-operation each year, and have it professionally maintained, annually. That reduces the worry factor for me.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:53 PM   #38
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,997
Greetings,
Mr. ps et al. I fully agree, catastrophe can strike seconds after the Admiral leaves the ER. It's keeping track of trends more than anything else although the Admiral picked up on a loose belt (rubber dust on bulkhead) I had missed in my morning check and a stuffing box I had over tightened the night before as well as a leaking injector tube. It's all good.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:55 PM   #39
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Average 125 hours engine-operation each year, and have it professionally maintained, annually. That reduces the worry factor for me.
Not saying worry, you are right. Many bigger things to worry about...just don't expect to hear, see or smell something before the proverbial do do hits the fan.

We all hopefully try to avoid, then be ready if it does happen.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 10:50 PM   #40
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
So, if an hourly eye-sight inspection is warranted, isn't every quarter hour four times better? So, why not continuous? And that often only covers the visual.
__________________

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012