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Old 05-02-2016, 08:45 PM   #81
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Doesn't it seem that a maserator/pump of substanial power (way, way above what is normally available today) could be designed/developed to have marine sized porcelain throne placed atop it so that there is no question that solids would get moved fast and completely???

What are you eating??? Solid waste is 75% water...even a manual toilet breaks it up pretty well so it dissolves very quickly in the tank. And an occasional overload that clogs the discharge line will usually dissolve on its own in an hour or less. But even if you are passing concrete blocks, you really need to check out today's all china marine "thrones"...'cuz they do have pumps and "grinders" (they don't even call 'em macerators) that can even chew up an occasional tampon. However, nothing can chew up a wet wipe...those shouldn't even be flushed at home. They're causing millions of $$ in damage to municipal sewers.
It does seem to me that for vacuum a unit like Masterflush does all they're asking for. MasterFlush Toilets - Dometic Corp

There are many other excellent units in the market today. The only one I have extensive experience with is Headhunter. On their demo they even show pantyhose being flushed, but I can't imagine the biological treatment would be terribly effective at disintegrating them and don't want to find out how the holding tank or the pump handles them.
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Old 05-02-2016, 09:06 PM   #82
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We put in a Masterflush, and really like it. If the power goes out, we have a bucket.
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Old 05-02-2016, 09:09 PM   #83
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We put in a Masterflush, and really like it. If the power goes out, we have a bucket.
I was very skeptical about a Vacuflush or any derivation thereof, but I now admit I have been very pleasantly surprised.
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:03 PM   #84
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Doesn't it seem that a maserator/pump of substanial power (way, way above what is normally available today) could be designed/developed to have marine sized porcelain throne placed atop it so that there is no question that solids would get moved fast and completely???

What are you eating??? Solid waste is 75% water...even a manual toilet breaks it up pretty well so it dissolves very quickly in the tank. And an occasional overload that clogs the discharge line will usually dissolve on its own in an hour or less. But even if you are passing concrete blocks, you really need to check out today's all china marine "thrones"...'cuz they do have pumps and "grinders" (they don't even call 'em macerators) that can even chew up an occasional tampon. However, nothing can chew up a wet wipe...those shouldn't even be flushed at home. They're causing millions of $$ in damage to municipal sewers.
Good God, Peggie - "What are you eating??? " - You didn't really have to use that terminology on this thread... followed by beginning of next sentence! - LOL GEEZZZ
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:07 PM   #85
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It does seem to me that for vacuum a unit like Masterflush does all they're asking for. MasterFlush Toilets - Dometic Corp

The MasterFlush isn't a vacuum toilet, it's Dometic's (nee SeaLand) private label version of a French clone of the Tecma called the Sanimarin Sanimarin SFA : the benchmark for automatic toilets - Sanimarin SFA

Tecma was originally an Italian toilet now owned by Thetford Tecma® Silence Plus | Products | Thetford
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Old 05-02-2016, 11:18 PM   #86
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Really Tough Toilets... That work first time, every time!

Our Tollycraft... Both Head's - Toilets: Raritan Crown Head – Model XCM / Series 0690 / 12 V / Centrifugal Discharge Series

Recent Model: Raritan Engineering | Crown Head II™ Electric Toilet


Raritan Crown Head Electric Toilet - White Marine Size - 90 Deg - 12 Volt - Raritan C-9-12# - Marine Heads and Portable Toilet Parts - Plumbing/Ventilation - Boatersland Marine
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Old 05-03-2016, 07:21 AM   #87
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The only realistic toilet for a New Boat would be an RV toilet set on top of the tank.

No electric , and the use of a pint a flush instead of quarts or more would mean the tank cam go 10+ times as long before pump or dump is required.

Usually impossible as a retro fit , but should be a concept .

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Just like with everything else on a boat, the sanitation system is a compromise. Putting an RV head directly above a holding tank might seem like a good idea if viewed in a vacuum, but in reality, it might mean installing the head in the saloon and there are good reasons not to do that.

In a smaller boat, space is limited and one of the compromises might be longer than ideal runs to the holding tank or excessive bends in the run.


I forget the maker, but we had a "Traveler" system in our Mainship Mk III, and it was reasonably bullet-proof as to function. Worked much like a non-portable porta-potty. Bombsight, so to speak.

Since it was a complete system, it didn't have lots of capacity, but I could imagine it not being very difficult to have a separate bowl and tank -- and then locating the more serious holding tank under the sole under the throne.

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Old 05-03-2016, 07:34 AM   #88
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How old was the Vacuflush? I'm hearing recent models give little trouble. I think sometimes on equipment we need to say how old the item we're praising or criticizing is. I make the same mistake by talking about a positive experience with something that is only 2 years old and not saying that.

I think that's a useful point to emphasize. I read (from the feedback here) that my experience with a Vacuflush system -- BAM! Ka-chunk ka-chunk ka-chunk -- is outdated. Fair enough, that was 10-12 years ago, so I haven't had first-hand insight into changes they may have made since then.

Another example seems to be about Jabsco "terlets" (cited only because of this thread's subject matter). Apparently a Jabsco manual saltwater-flush model is way different from an electric saltwater-flush is way different from our Quiet Flush electric freshwater-flush model... but all Jabsco heads seem to suffer from the same description. Somebody says Jabsco, often without regard to model or era or whatever. To read about 'em, all are loud, none will handle urine (let alone macerating solids or TP), and so forth. Not our experience, but then we've not used the saltwater-flush models.

Not saying what we have is the end all and be all of the toilet world, just using that to reinforce the thought about product differentiation, evolution, age and service factors, etc.

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Old 05-03-2016, 10:53 AM   #89
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I forget the maker, but we had a "Traveler" system in our Mainship Mk III, and it was reasonably bullet-proof as to function. Worked much like a non-portable porta-potty. Bombsight, so to speak.

Since it was a complete system, it didn't have lots of capacity, but I could imagine it not being very difficult to have a separate bowl and tank -- and then locating the more serious holding tank under the sole under the throne.

-Chris
Again, not every boat has room for a holding tank directly under the head. Mine does not and there's no practical place to put the head where it would be directly over the holding tank.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:09 AM   #90
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Maybe I'm dreaming - would not be the first time!

But:

Doesn't it seem that a maserator/pump of substanial power (way, way above what is normally available today) could be designed/developed to have marine sized porcelain throne placed atop it so that there is no question that solids would get moved fast and completely???

So what if it takes a few or even many more amps to feed the BIG BAD macerator/pump for its designed purposes. That's what strong house bank batt setups are for.

I often have concrete/grout pumped, done it for decades... difference twixt that and crap is just levels of scale.

In other words - I think marine toilet discharge pumps and methods in general are tiny, tiny, puny at best.

Happy Crappy Daze! - Art

Yea - Peggie!!

Good God Man!? Just how big are your dumps that any of the good quality marine heads out there now can't handle them?

I just don't get all the fuss about and need to reengineer marine heads?

Saying home style gravity heads are the best way to go on a boat is unrealistic in most cases. The engineering design is just to limiting for the realities of boat design. Especially smaller boats.

And the good quality marine heads out there now are not a big deal to use or maintain.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:14 AM   #91
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Since it was a complete system, it didn't have lots of capacity, but I could imagine it not being very difficult to have a separate bowl and tank -- and then locating the more serious holding tank under the sole under the throne.

-Chris
You have a limited imagination then.

Vac U Flushes don't ka chunk any more. Their newer pumps are very quite.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:36 AM   #92
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I forget the maker, but we had a "Traveler" system in our Mainship Mk III, and it was reasonably bullet-proof as to function. Worked much like a non-portable porta-potty. Bombsight, so to speak.

It's the SeaLand (now Dometic) 7-11 M28 Marine Traveler...a self-contained system with an all china bowl--SeaLand's RV gravity toilet that looks like and has a flush pedal just like a VacuFlush and is also fed by pressurized fresh water--on a short pedestal sitting atop a 9 gallon tank. It's an excellent self-contained system...and you're right, it's an MSD portapotty "on steroids."

Since it was a complete system, it didn't have lots of capacity,

It has a lot more than you think it does. Because, unlike the VacuFlush, it really does only need about 1 pint of water--just enough to rinse the flush into the tank, the 9 gallon tank can hold 60-75 flushes...you'd need at least a 30-40 gallon tank to hold that many from any manual or electric toilet. If that's not enough capacity, you can add a second tank and put a y-valve and macerator pump in the pumpout line to transfer the contents to it.

Because it is completely self-contained, a lot more elegant than a portapotty and has a very reasonable price, I've always liked it a lot. It just has one drawback: the tank footprint is about 20" x 20"...too large for a lot of head compartments.

I just about given up trying to find anything on the Dometic site any more, but you can check it out in detail on the Defender site: SeaLand Traveler at Defender HopCar may also have it, if not, Parks can get it for you.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:57 AM   #93
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Looks like a neat, affordable unit.

What I don't understand: What do you do when it's full at 9 + gals. Does it have pipe that goes in near by deck of boat for pump out? Maybe needs to be evacuated through bowl bottom, through head window??


OH - Since writing the above. Pg. 3 of owners manual explains how to hook it up for exterior pump out. Pretty simple toilet to have on a boat.
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Old 05-03-2016, 12:05 PM   #94
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It's designed to be pumped out through a deck pumpout fitting, same as any other holding tank...has a fitting for a pumpout line and vent line.
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Old 05-03-2016, 12:30 PM   #95
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What I don't understand: What do you do when it's full at 9 + gals. Does it have pipe that goes in near by deck of boat for pump out? Maybe needs to be evacuated through bowl bottom, through head window??

OH - Since writing the above. Pg. 3 of owners manual explains how to hook it up for exterior pump out. Pretty simple toilet to have on a boat.
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It's designed to be pumped out through a deck pumpout fitting, same as any other holding tank...has a fitting for a pumpout line and vent line.

Yep, worked like a champ.

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Old 05-03-2016, 12:52 PM   #96
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Yep, worked like a champ.

-Chris
I can see, as I believe Peggie mentioned before, it would be good idea having a transfer pump/macerator/line from that toilet's rather small holding tank into a bigger holding tank that's near by.

To my way of thinking, planning: Seems this would work especially well if the bigger holding tank's top is just above (4+/- inches above) the top of toilet's tank. That way no pressure build up from toilet tank could maybe seep past transfer pump's impeller to overload the larger tank... even when both might become full.

With two tanks and such minimal flush-water volume it seems there would be considerable time available between pump outs from both tanks; each having a deck fitting for suction evacuation.

I like this idea and feel it might work well aboard our Tolly if need ever comes to install different toilets.

Also, except for the transfer pump amps, (which would not too often need to be used) electric energy use for generally flushing the toilet would be non existent.

Simple is as simple does!


I've full pictures, description, and links in my computer's "Yachting" folder - LOL
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:45 PM   #97
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There are a lot of you trying to invent something that already exists in better form than you can create. There are many good toilet options and waste systems for boats. They are excellent straight out of the box, installed exactly as their manual says and used as instructed. There's nothing more to it than that. Don't overcomplicate things so. It's not that complex.

I read here and on the cruising site of the apparently millions of problems with heads on boats when I was getting started in coastal boating. However, I haven't experienced any of those problems and I'm using equipment and systems straight as they come from the manufacturer.
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Old 05-03-2016, 02:02 PM   #98
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There are a lot of you trying to invent something that already exists in better form than you can create. There are many good toilet options and waste systems for boats. They are excellent straight out of the box, installed exactly as their manual says and used as instructed. There's nothing more to it than that. Don't overcomplicate things so. It's not that complex.

I read here and on the cruising site of the apparently millions of problems with heads on boats when I was getting started in coastal boating. However, I haven't experienced any of those problems and I'm using equipment and systems straight as they come from the manufacturer.
With all due respect Mr. B

IMHO... You may be playing with bigger boats and larger sums of disposable fun-money than some members on TF. Product affordability and readily available self-installation product capabilities, often requiring installation-inventive owner-opportunities, are often the deciding factors regarding equipment (toilets included) for many boat owners.

Therefore, musings as to how to most easily and at lowest cost be able to have good working toilets result in posts... containing helpful suggestions past on for others to contemplate.
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Old 05-03-2016, 02:17 PM   #99
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With all due respect Mr. B

IMHO... You may be playing with bigger boats and larger sums of disposable fun-money than some members on TF. Product affordability and readily available self-installation product capabilities, often requiring installation-inventive owner-opportunities, are often the deciding factors regarding equipment (toilets included) for many boat owners.

Therefore, musings as to how to most easily and at lowest cost be able to have good working toilets result in posts... containing helpful suggestions past on for others to contemplate.
I may be, but the single toilets are really much the same and Peggie has made many excellent recommendations. No, it's not the lowest cost perhaps to purchase a quality unit, but I think there is quite a cost to having continual problems with older units and with DIY modifications. I think many inventive owners are getting themselves into trouble with their inventions.

I don't think reinventing the wheel ever qualifies in "how to most easily". I know many people using inexpensive systems, relatively new and properly installed and having no issues. I have a good friend who is a yacht manager and regularly installs new units to replace old outdated and poorly functioning units. The problems are eliminated and the new units working find. He's having very good success with brands he once was very skeptical of. Now, I'll drop the subject, but just in my viewpoint, if I'm having continual issues, I'm going to replace with a new unit, selected within my affordability and installed as the manufacturer recommends.
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Old 05-03-2016, 03:18 PM   #100
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With all due respect Mr. B

IMHO... You may be playing with bigger boats and larger sums of disposable fun-money than some members on TF. Product affordability and readily available self-installation product capabilities, often requiring installation-inventive owner-opportunities, are often the deciding factors regarding equipment (toilets included) for many boat owners.

Therefore, musings as to how to most easily and at lowest cost be able to have good working toilets result in posts... containing helpful suggestions past on for others to contemplate.
yep
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