Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-27-2014, 12:34 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Pittsburgh Pa.
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 58
East vs West

Anybody that has experience cruising both coasts. How well do Trawlers do in the Pacific? How do dockage costs compare?
__________________
Advertisement

Iknowimcrazy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 12:49 PM   #2
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iknowimcrazy View Post
Anybody that has experience cruising both coasts. How well do Trawlers do in the Pacific? How do dockage costs compare?
The Pacific is a big area. Of course, so is the Atlantic. Trawler type boats are the boat of choice in the PNW. California is more sport boat and yacht but trawlers still work. Dockage in the PNW is less than most East Coast areas, but in California it's higher.

Are you trying to compare specific areas?

Much of East Coast cruising is done in the ICW and that's a huge difference. Much of the West Coast leaves no where good to duck as when the weather gets rough then even the inlets that do exist are difficult. We live in South Florida and have spent a good bit of recent time in the PNW. Rough conditions are more common in the PNW. But then on the East Coast, that could be said for the far NE as well, Maine and on up. The Pacific swells are much more prevalent than swells on the East Coast where waves are more commonly wind produced.

But a huge difference from Seward to San Diego just as there is from Halifax to Key West.
__________________

BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 01:45 PM   #3
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,797
Way, way too general a question. Try to home in on a particular area. I have been fortunate to have boated on almost the entirety of both coasts and their immediate inland waters. I disagree with B and B's assessment as it also way too broad.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 02:03 PM   #4
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
Way, way too general a question. Try to home in on a particular area. I have been fortunate to have boated on almost the entirety of both coasts and their immediate inland waters. I disagree with B and B's assessment as it also way too broad.
I intended to state the same as you but make assessments only on PNW and some very few general statements such as ICW exists on East Coast but not on West Coast. I do totally agree with you can't lump all of either coast. I can answer Alaska versus Florida but Atlantic vs. Pacific is two huge areas that have tremendous variations within them. To answer in any degree of information we do need him to speak of specific areas.

Also, I freely admit that I cannot speak to boating on the California coast. I have looked into docking though enough to know it's far more expensive than in the PNW. I was shocked at the low rates in the PNW. Maybe he'll post now and give some specific areas.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 02:35 PM   #5
Guru
 
Edelweiss's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1976 Californian Tricabin LRC
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,834
When you say PNW, depends on what you're talking about. Even that is awfully broad and open to interpretation!! When I think PNW, that's the Columbia River and North to around Juneau. But I'm sure some will argue further South or North.

A majority of the pleasure boating here is the Columbia River, Puget Sound, San Juan Islands, Juan de Fuca straits, Gulf Islands, the inside of Vancouver Island, BC mainland coastal waters and the inside passage to SE Alaska. And yes, there are those who venture out to the open waters of the pacific.

All pretty well protected and doable in a 20' boat and outboard on the inside. But picking your weather is certainly important though. The Straits of Juan de Fuca, Georgia and Queen Charlottes can be a butt kicker at times!!

Moorage costs. . .the nearer to Seattle you are the higher they go!! A new 46' slip at port of Anacortes is 6 boat dollar per month.
__________________
Larry B
Careful . . .I Have a Generator and I'm not afraid to use it !
Edelweiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 02:48 PM   #6
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edelweiss View Post
When you say PNW, depends on what you're talking about. Even that is awfully broad and open to interpretation!! When I think PNW, that's the Columbia River and North to around Juneau. But I'm sure some will argue further South or North.

A majority of the pleasure boating here is the Columbia River, Puget Sound, San Juan Islands, Juan de Fuca straits, Gulf Islands, the inside of Vancouver Island, BC mainland coastal waters and the inside passage to SE Alaska. And yes, there are those who venture out to the open waters of the pacific.

All pretty well protected and doable in a 20' boat and outboard on the inside. But picking your weather is certainly important though. The Straits of Juan de Fuca, Georgia and Queen Charlottes can be a butt kicker at times!!

Moorage costs. . .the nearer to Seattle you are the higher they go!! A new 46' slip at port of Anacortes is 6 boat dollar per month.
You are correct and I should have recognized that in my response. There is a lot of boating in rather protected waters versus off shore. We've done both very recently so for me to overlook that was a miscue. As to moorage costs, even the Seattle and Anacortes costs are lower than South Florida. Transient charges still very low. Elliott Bay at $1.25 per foot and Cap Sante at $1.30 if I remember correctly. Those would both be on the low end of the East coast. South Florida is more in the $3 range. Miami Beach Marina is $4.50 up to 50 ft., $5 for 50-75, and $7 over that.

But I did speak too generally in even using the term PNW. I know there are many boaters in Seattle who never pass Cape Flattery just as many on the East Coast who never venture outside the ICW.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 03:28 PM   #7
Veteran Member
 
City: Pittsburgh Pa.
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 58
I know, it's a general question. I'm only seeking seeking general answers. Thank you.
Iknowimcrazy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 04:12 PM   #8
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iknowimcrazy View Post
I know, it's a general question. I'm only seeking seeking general answers. Thank you.
Well, then....general. West coast is cold and hot. East coast is cold and hot. West coast has calm and rough seas. East coast has calm and rough seas. West coast has expensive and inexpensive. East coast has expensive and inexpensive.

Sorry, but these are huge expanses of coasts and there is more difference between the southernmost and northernmost points of each coast than between the coasts. The point is that on both coasts there are many different boating environments. I made the mistake of attempting to answer the impossible as was pointed out to me. I honestly don't know what you are looking for.

Where are you located?
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:27 PM   #9
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
West Coast usually has less humidity than the East Coast. (I hate humidity!) Also, West Coast winters are comparatively mild, permitting year-round boating.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:38 PM   #10
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
West Coast usually has less humidity than the East Coast. (I hate humidity!) Also, West Coast winters are comparatively mild, permitting year-round boating.
Our winter is milder in Fort Lauderdale permitting year round boating.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:41 PM   #11
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Our winter is milder in Fort Lauderdale permitting year round boating.
I'd expect so in the tropics. But don't you have a hurricane season?
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:44 PM   #12
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
I'd expect so in the tropics. But don't you have a hurricane season?
Occasionally. All the East Coast does even if people think South Florida has more. Not really so much the case. Our house was removed from the worst level of flood territories this past year to reflect the history better. The Gulf of Mexico coast also has hurricanes. West Coast has earthquakes and volcano eruptions instead, although don't know how they impact boaters.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 09:28 PM   #13
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
West Coast usually has less humidity than the East Coast. (I hate humidity!) Also, West Coast winters are comparatively mild, permitting year-round boating.
I'm with you Mark
Attached Images
 
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 09:29 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Billyfeet's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: JOHN D. MACDONALD
Vessel Model: FAIRCHILD SCOUT 30
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 179
Well I know the East Coast pretty well from Cape Cod to the Keys. The chance to cruise in protected waters or short passages is excellent all the way. Plenty of free anchorages if you look for them. Lots of waterfront towns with marinas or anchoring possibilities. You can move from great weather in Florida during the winter to great weather in the summer in New England and then spend spring and fall in the Chesapeake. Dockage can be reasonable to astronomical depending on where you are. Florida is miserably hot and humid in summer and Rhode Island is miserably cold and damp in the winter. I also know Southern California. There is nomplace to anchor for more than a few days. Dockage is hard to find, you will be dead before you get to the end of the waiting list for a "liveaboard slip", the weather is awesome year round for living aboard, but you won't be living aboard. Not many places to go and anchor out and frequently there is a ground swell in the open anchorages that will roll your guts out. I live in SoCal and do my cruising on land in a small camper van or on a surfboard.. I do my boating on the east coast.
Billyfeet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2014, 01:20 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
City: Anacortes
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 301
What's a trawler?
ghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2014, 01:28 AM   #16
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost View Post
What's a trawler?
A thing that crawls or moves at a slow pace, especially an insect.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2014, 08:32 AM   #17
Veteran Member
 
City: NH
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 72
I'm uncertain exactly what a Trawler is. I think it may be a Sea Ray that you operate with both anchors deployed. But you need the right anchors.
Jobe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2014, 10:08 AM   #18
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Country: pinellas
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,199
Having lived and boated in the SF area and the east coast my first thoughts were that there are more places to go on the east coast without making serious offshore passages.
From Santa Barbara north to Puget sound the coast has few places to easily stop compared to the east coast. IMO the west coast is far more attractive but far more difficult conditions at times. Even in good weather the entrances to many places can get "sporting". I have serious respect for anyone who regularly cruises from the Columbia river.
Even going a hundred miles north or south of SF requires commitment, once you are out there you are staying out until you reach the few safe harbors.
__________________

bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012