Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-27-2011, 09:08 AM   #1
Member
 
Old Goat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 18
Earnestly Seeking Advice

I have a question for the Forum that is very important to us.*

We want to own a trawler to do cruising and to use as a summer retreat on the water.* We plan on keeping it on Lake Erie in the beginning and then eventaully setting off to do the "Loop."* My concern came about when I bought and just began reading "Honey Let's Get a Boat."* After they bought their bought, had the survey and repaired everything that was identified in the survey needing repair, they took their boat out and everything began falling apart causing a huge repair bill.

My concern is the funds we have available to do this.* We have managed to save $140,000.* If we buy a boat and then get hit with huge repair bills, we will have nothing left to use for cruising.* We will have pensions, but that won't cover unexpected monsterous repairs.* The only thing is, we don't want to abandon our dream and would feel like something were missing in our life if we don't buy the boat.

I'm not sure how to ask this question, but I'm beginning to get the jitters about a boat purchase.* Have any of you exerpienced the same before making the decision to purchase your boat?**Am I just being paranoid?

May I hear your minds and hearts on this?

Thanks!

Ron
__________________
Advertisement

Old Goat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 09:35 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
marinetrader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 301
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Hi Ron,

As a broker, I hear this repeatedly from my customers. I have had them say the same things, what if that breaks, stops or quits. My answer is always the same. We will look carefully for a good boat and make sure a good surveyor checks her out. Significant issues will most always come up during survey but there will always be the chance some minor issues occur later; an air conditioning compressor quits. Boats are mechanical and things break, but rarely are they significant.

But don't let that keep you from fulfilling a dream. None of my customers has backed out and everyone of them are still smiling
__________________

marinetrader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 09:41 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
GarryP's Avatar
 
City: Homosassa River, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Mango Mama
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 114
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

If you have $140,000, don't buy a boat for $140,000. Buy a good boat for $100,000 or less (there are some good deals out there) then fix and update what is needed. That way the important stuff is new or recently upgraded so it can be reliable. Do what work you can do yourself and hire good people to do the rest. Don't strive for perfection (very expensive), strive for reliable and good enough.
GarryP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 10:03 AM   #4
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Country: US
Vessel Name: "Sandpiper"
Vessel Model: 2006 42' Ocean Alexander Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,421
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Quote:
Old Goat wrote:
I have a question for the Forum that is very important to us........

*If we buy a boat and then get hit with huge repair bills, we will have nothing left to use for cruising.............*

I'm not sure how to ask this question, but I'm beginning to get the jitters about a boat purchase............
* * * ** Ron:

******** You have ask a very thoughtful & valid question. One's first reaction is to tell you to

******** follow your dream, however, after carefully reading your post & breaking down key

******** words in it, I would advise you to "not buy a boat."* (I'll probably get hammered

******** for that one.)* Boating is not for everyone but most everyone that has a boat says

******* "go for it!"* Boats are expensive to maintain, (properly) whether you make the

******** repairs yourself or hire them out. Something is always breaking! To keep the boat

******** on Lake Erie in the Winter is another matter. (I'm from Erie, PA.)

****** * Perhaps a truck and trailer is the way you should go. Couple it with a "car topper"

******** for fishing, etc. and you can summer about anywhere you wish.

*

******** Just my opinion..........

********
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 10:24 AM   #5
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,154
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Quote:
marinetrader wrote:
Hi Ron,

As a broker, I hear this repeatedly from my customers. I have had them say the same things, what if that breaks, stops or quits. My answer is always the same. We will look carefully for a good boat and make sure a good surveyor checks her out. Significant issues will most always come up during survey but there will always be the chance some minor issues occur later; an air conditioning compressor quits. Boats are mechanical and things break, but rarely are they significant.

But don't let that keep you from fulfilling a dream. None of my customers has backed out and everyone of them are still smiling
Mike makes a good point... The major downside that I can't seem to resolve in my head is that it's very hard to do that while just "shopping around". Surveys cost a lot of money... you don't know if you REALLY want to buy it UNTIL you get a survey... But if you get a survey and DON'T want to buy it, your out hundreds of dollars. Too many times doing that and you'll never be interested in boating. You'll get scared off by sticker shock of the shopping alone.

I always felt a little pressure and felt a bit rushed because once the ball starts rolling, it's hard to stop. You sign a commintment to buy and put a deposit down to hold... So you are already on the hook... Then, and only then, you order a survey... If you do not want to buy, you have to reverse the whole proceedure. It's maddening.

I sure wish surveyers and brokers can allow you a very close look (without getting a full survey) at a reasonible price and before you make any commitments. But they always seem to want to get the ball rolling.
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 10:26 AM   #6
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,853
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Seahorse II makes a good point.* Cruising on a budget without reserves for major repairs is doable, but you would have to be very flexible.* Having been around the icW for some 40 years, I have seen much.* There have been people that would have to stop and get jobs to pay for repairs so that they could keep going.* I have known some that worked in restaurants and bars, around the marinas, painting boat names, you name it.* They still enjoyed what they were doing, but the expense of keeping a boat in condition to cruise expensive.* There is always the cost of insurance and fuel.* Just replaceing a large battery bank can cost upwards of $2,000.00.* Even newer boats have things go wrong.* The marine environment is hard on equipment.

I'm not saying that you couldn't do it, but it would take the proper attitude to deal with it.* I spend too much money on my boating, but that is just something I will do as long as I can.
Moonstruck is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 10:55 AM   #7
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

My feeling is you always have to have at least 10 grand available for un knows.* A boat is like a vehicle and house all in one and there is a good chance something will come up.* You might be able to get partial financing for the boat, but*you will probable not get financing for a remodel/repair.
*
Also make a list of repair/wants and prepare a priority list and budget, and make it flexible as things change.* I made a list 16 years ago and there are still several items on the list not done/complete.* Each year I make a list/budget/schedule and do not take one to much at one time.* I am still doing/working on things that were scheduled for April/May because of the weather and personal family items.*
*
Most dirt/wantabe boaters have in the mind the ultimate frosting on the cake, CRUISINGS.* What they do not see/know is the funds and time required to cruise. If you can/do not enjoy the boat tied to the dock as well as cruising then, you probable will not be a happy boater and/or meet you boating goals as you are going to be frustrated, and cost you a lot more than you thought.
*
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 10:59 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
yachtbrokerguy's Avatar


 
City: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Model: I have keys to lots of boats...
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 469
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Quote:
*
I sure wish surveyers and brokers can allow you a very close look (without getting a full survey) at a reasonible price and before you make any commitments. But they always seem to want to get the ball rolling.

*As a broker I always allow the potential buyer to spend as much time as possible on board and sometimes suggest that if the surveyor is local that they inspect the boat at the dock before doing a haul out and sea trial. On a few occassions I have suggested a buyer do a pre survey sea trial, that they go for a short ride to get the feel of the boat. However these are done after a buyer and seller have made an agreement, there is a commitment.

In the $100,000 price range a good boat in decent condition that is comforatble for the loop will take some effort to find, but there will be good choices available. and then there can be some reserve for repairs.

*
yachtbrokerguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 11:05 AM   #9
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Country: US
Vessel Name: "Sandpiper"
Vessel Model: 2006 42' Ocean Alexander Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,421
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:*I spend too much money on my boating, but that is just something I will do as long as I can.
******** I am definitely in Don'camp. I spend too much, also, but it is within my financial

******** resources to do so. My problem is that "I just can't imagine being without a boat in

******** my life."
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 11:09 AM   #10
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,154
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Quote:
SeaHorse II wrote:Moonstruck wrote:*I spend too much money on my boating, but that is just something I will do as long as I can.
******** I am definitely in Don'camp. I spend too much, also, but it is within my financial

******** resources to do so. My problem is that "I just can't imagine being without a boat in

******** my life."

*+1*10^5
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 11:30 AM   #11
JD
Guru
 
JD's Avatar
 
City: New Bern NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Stella Di Mare
Vessel Model: Mainship 34t
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,702
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Ron,

You don't mention how old you are and your boating experience* You don't mention where you will keep the boat (Erie is a big lake).* If you are close to retirement age why not move the boat south.* The cost to keep a boat on the hard in Cleveland or Lorain is as much as it is to keep a boat in the water full time here in NC.* Are you going to keep a land home? *Is that really necessary?* Is the house paid off?* Or are both going to be an expense.* The point is you are the only one that can make these decisions.*

Looking at boats is like looking at cars or houses.* If the boat you are looking at is McGivered together in every way it is going to cost you a ton to keep it floating.* One that is clean and neat like a nice looking car means it probably has had good maintenance and will only cost half a ton to keep a float.* But cost it will as Moonstruck says.

Are you capable of some repairs your self or will you have to have every thing done for you?* Another deciding factor.

You might read the thread on Buyers Brokers.* A good broker can save you a lot of time and find you only boats that are worth the trip to see.* Don't limit yourself to boats only on the three lakes near you.* Your best boat may be in FL or here in NC.* Look around, go see a lot of boats.* Take two or three day holidays and go look at several boats in NJ or MD.* Go to FL over Christmas and look at boats there.* Take your time. I think all totaled I spent several thousand dollars on boat seeking expeditions and that was just to get an idea as to what I really wanted.

As far as surveys go if the boat looks good and it doesn't smell bad (I'm not kidding here) then you might be interested in getting an insurance type*survey done.* This does not require a haul out and the Surveyor can tell you a lot about the boat that may save you heart ache later.* If it passes muster than you can decide to have it hauled and the rest of the survey can take place including the sea trial.* True you may have to pay for the Surveyor to come back a second time but that will only add up to a couple of hundred more in the end than a full survey would from the start.* If it fails then go on to the next boat.*

Just some ideas. Hope they help.

PS.* I heard there is a coaching job available near you.* So you might be able to pick up a few extra bucks and then you can buy anything you want.
JD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 12:14 PM   #12
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

A lot of times a survey has already been done which will usually point out the problems with the boat.**So ask if there is a recient survey and then ask about the invoice for the repair bills pertaining to that survey.

As far as the jitters the thing you need most is a good sound hull and deck.**As few leaks as possible ( all boats leak) and a good motor. Most other considerations will be nominal in expence or no more than a boat buck or two (I boat buck= $1,000.00) As long as she is running you can live with a blown windshield wiper or an older set of electronics.

The best advice is to take your time the more you look the more you will know about boats.* Ask all the questions you like.**If the answers are not what you like.**Keep looking Lots of boats for sale.*All boats are for sale. Knowledge is money.

SD
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 01:34 PM   #13
Guru
 
Conrad's Avatar
 
City: Calgary
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blue Sky
Vessel Model: Nordic Tugs 42 Hull #001
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,553
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Quote:
skipperdude wrote:
A lot of times a survey has already been done which will usually point out the problems with the boat.**So ask if there is a recient survey and then ask about the invoice for the repair bills pertaining to that survey.

*

That is a great starting point, and could be an early go/no go indicator, but do NOT rely on the seller's survey as the ultimate check on the boat's condition. A survey done for a seller will have a certain slant wheras a survey done for a buyer will have a different slant. You want the latter slant.
Conrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 02:13 PM   #14
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Ron---

I don't participate in this forum anymore since I think every topic that can be talked about has been covered about 10,000 times before, but your basic question is an excellent one and is something every boater has faced at one point or another. So although I've said all this before ad nauseum perhaps it will be of some benefit......

Owning a boat is a never-ending expense. The purchase price of the boat is only the down payment for the boat. Something a surprising number of boat buyers overlook is the ownership cost of a boat. Ownership cost consists of: insurance, moorage, annual registration fees (if applicable), electricity (uniess the moorage fee includes this), fuel, servicing, maintenance, upgrades, and repairs. In other words, everything but the purchase price/payments on the boat.

A very rough, but basically accurate, rule of thumb for calculating annual ownership cost is ten percent of the purchase price of the boat per year. So if you buy a boat for $100,000 you should figure on spending about $10,000 per year on ownership cost the entire time you own the boat.

As I said, it's a very rough rule of thumb. A brand new or nearly new boat will not have the maintenance, repair, and upgrade costs of an older boat, at least not for a number of years, so the annual ownership cost will be less than ten percent, perhaps a lot less. On the other hand, an older boat may end up needing a lot of things done to it and the annual ownership cost can easily exceed the ten percent figure, at least in some years.

Doing as much of the servicing, maintenance, and repair work on the boat yourself is one way to reduce that ten percent figure. And some years not much will have to be done so the ownership cost will be lower, perhaps much lower. Other years you may need to replace a shaft or install new engine mounts or have a new exhaust system put in, and the ownership cost for that year may exceed the ten percent figure, perhaps by a lot. But on average, with average boats, ten percent per year is a pretty accurate number to use for initial budgeting purposes. It has certainly been the case with our older Grand Banks, and we try to do as much of the servicing, maintenance, and repair ourselves as possible.

Way back in the 1960s I read a fictional story in Boy's Life Magazine about a young man who came to a New England seaport town and decided he wanted to buy a sailboat. Another young man, a local boy who was an expert sailor, gave him a piece of advice which was, "Buy the smallest boat you can afford." By which he meant that for x-amount of dollars, the smaller a boat one buys, the newer it will be, or the better shape it will be in, which generally amounts to the same thing. So you get a better boat for the money and you get a boat that will not need a ton of work just to make it usable.

Needless to say, the newcomer did not follow this advice and bought the largest sailboat his budget could accommodate. The boat was a disaster and when combined with the newcomer's lack of sailing experience the inevitable end result was the rather dramatic loss of the boat.

"Buy the smallest boat you can afford" is a simplistic statement designed to stick in your mind--- it obviously has in mine. However it needs a bit of interpretation. You certainly don't want to buy a boat that's too small for your needs. If what you want to do, the number of people you want to carry, etc. dictate a 42 foot boat, then buy a 42 foot boat. But don't buy a 50 foot boat just because you find one that fits your purchase budget if the right 42 foot boat will meet your requirements.

The other thing I feel is important to do is to forget about makes and models of boat at this point. Define what you want to do with the boat first. Ask yourself every question you can think of that applies to what you want to do with the boat and how you want to use it. How many people on board? How many heads/toilets do you want? What kind of waters are you going to cruise in? Are you going to be going through a lot of locks? If so, what kind of deck access do you need to set fenders and lines? Are you going to anchor out or marina-hop? What kind of galley do you want, propane or electric? How fast do you want to go? What's the weather going to be like where you cruise? Do you need air conditioning? Will you need to deal with a rainy climate a lot? Do you prefer one engine or two (either way has its advantages and disadvantages--- there is no right or wrong one-size-fits-all answer here). Are you going to have pets on board? Kids? What does your boating partner want out of the experience? What will make her confident and happy out on the water. (Example--- my wife is more confident and relaxed with two engines under the floor instead of one even though we used to charter a single engine boat and she enjoys flying a single engine floatplane into remote territory in SE Alaska and BC. So for us, this makes a twin-engine boat a requirement despite the higher fuel, service, and maintenance costs-- having a relaxed and confident boating partner is worth whatever it takes to achieve this.)

The more questions you can think of to ask and answer, the better the definition of your boat requirements will be.

Once you have asked and answered all these questions, you will then have the data you need to start narrowing down the type of boat that will best suit your needs. It may not be a "trawler-type" boat at all. It might be a cruiser-type boat (Bayliner, Tollycraft, etc.). It might even be a trailerable boat. Or it might be a trawler-type.

And never, never, get into boating with the idea that a boat is some sort of investment unless you're buying something like a restored vintage Gar Wood or Hacker Craft. There are exceptions to this and one can lease-back a boat into charter and perhaps cover the ownership costs and whatnot. But for the most part for most people a recreational boat is a toy and as such you will always lose money on it. Sure, in 1998 we paid more than twice as much for our Grand Banks than what it sold for brand new in 1973 but that's just the actual dollar amount. In terms of dollar value, we paid significantly less than the boat had been worth new. In 1973 a new GB36 cost about $40,000 equipped. In 1998 a new GB36 cost well in excess of $300,000 equipped. We bought our boat with the intention of never seeing one dime out of it at the end. All the expenses--- new exhausts, shafts, radios, GPS plotters, engine mounts, etc., etc., etc.--- are simply the cost of being able to enjoy the boat.

One thing we did when we went to California to inspect, sea trial, and have surveyed the boat we eventually bought was to take a good friend with us who had spent thirty-plus years in the marine propulsion/generator industry. He knows boats like ours backwards and forwards and, most important, could have cared less if we bought the boat or not. My wife and I were totally new to this type of boat and short of an electrical panel actually being on fire, we were not experienced enough to accurately evaluate boat systems and construction ourselves. But our friend was. The money we spent on his airfare and lodging for a couple of days was probably the best money we've ever spent as his presence helped us properly evaluate the boat and then have confidence in our final decision. I don't know if you know anyone in a similar position, but if you do a person like this can be a real asset.

Finally, never forget that this whole boating thing is supposed to be fun. If you buy the wrong boat, or get in over your head with a boat that needs a lot of work, or if you get a boat that proves to not really do what you want it to do, your boating experience will not be all that enjoyable and could end up being a giant-- and expensive-- frustration. So don't rush it, take plenty of time to truly evaluate what you want a boat to do for you, and then shop carefully. There are a ton of boats out there, they're not going away, and you will always have a huge selection to pick from. Talk to boaters who do what you are hoping to do. This will help you get a realistic idea of what you need in a boat and will start generating a short-list of potential boat makes and models that could fit your needs. When the day comes you think you've narrowed your search down to a particular boat, spend the money for hull and engine surveys by the best surveyors for this type of boat you can find. This usually means two surveyors as most of them tend to specialize in hulls/structure/systems or engines.

Whether you get the right boat or the wrong boat, either way it's going to cost you a bunch of money to buy it and own it. So better you take your time and do everything you can to ensure you get the right boat. Do it right, and you'll have the time of your life.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 02:29 PM   #15
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,719
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Ron,

I don't see it yet so my 2 cents worth is to start thinking of a smaller/newer boat that is more likely to be in perfect shape. It will probably be too small for you but a very good example would be a 25' Albin aft cabin Swedish cruiser. With a newer engine they are as bullet proof as a boat can get. They have stainless steel fuel tanks that don't give trouble and no plywood to rot. They are very seaworthy and sell typically for $20-30K. They avoid almost ALL the huge pitfalls that the typical Taiwanese Trawler or similar boat has to cut a boat owner off at the knees. Has FF recommended a non-trawler yet? That could be a good way to go too.
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 03:12 PM   #16
Guru
 
Woodsong's Avatar
 
City: Atlanta
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,630
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

This is one of those situations where it sure would be handy to be able to look into a crystal ball and see the future!
As you are shopping and prepare to buy, it is all about minimizing your risk. Things you can do to reduce your risk of unforeseen repairs, etc.:

1) Buy a 100% freshwater vessel! The fact of the matter is that salt water is tough on boats and all mechanicals. Apples to apples, a freshwater boat will be WAY ahead of the curve when it comes to system quality and condition. Caveat with that is, particularly as you get into older boats, maintenance history becomes much more important than make/brand. Generally speaking though, a 20 year old freshwater boat kept under a covered slip her entire life will be in better condition than a 20 year old FL salt water boat. Again, that is a big generalization as ownership history and use and upkeep can play a lot into that equation.

2) Have a buyer's broker with experience in the type of boat you are buying. They can help you weed out the junk and there is a lot of junk out there sometimes.

3) Be sure you are comfortable with your budget. Stuff does break and things go wrong. Buying the right boat with good upkeep history will greatly reduce your risk here. Often times it can be the little things....A/C units, the head, etc. Checking the quality and age of those systems will go a long way to see what other upcoming costs may be looming.

4) if you hone in on a particular make/model/year do as much research as possible- a lot of boats have particular issues associated with them that if you discover that upfront you can look for those problems and possibly save a lot of headache.

5) The 2 minute rule: generally speaking, you can tell within 2 minutes of setting foot on a boat as to whether it was well taken care of and is in good shape. This is not always the case but if the cabin and exterior and living quarters are dirty, smelly, and unkept, odds are the engine room won't be a happy place either.

6) Avoid teak decks! I don't care how pretty and nice they are- they will eventually lead to big issues.

7) A single screw boat is a lot cheaper to run and own than a twin screw boat IF you can get good at handling a single screw.

8) If you go for a newer boat keep in mind that one of your largest expenses is that which is usually overlooked in some regards and that is DEPRECIATION. I lost more in depreciation on my 2005 model year sedan I sold before owning our trawler than all other expenses.

9) Buy a freshwater vessel!!!

10) Have fun, whether on a large or small boat. Worse case- get a pontoon boat with a little cabin enclosure and go out and have fun on the water because that is what it is all about. i have a friend with a little 25' bowrider with a bimini and eisenglass enclosure, a small portapoty, etc. and that guy on that boat has cruised thousands of miles all over the place.

All the above are broad brush generalizations and each boat is different but my advice is to not give up on the dream- just do a lot of homework and research and educate yourself as much as possible.
Woodsong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 03:33 PM   #17
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,154
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Add a 5A to Tony's post... LISTEN TO YOUR WIFE!!!!!!! Make sure she is happy with the "vibe" of the choice. I won't go into the particulars, but you can almost say... LET HER MAKE THE FINAL DECISION. I she's not happy, you'll have no fun.
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 07:09 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
johnma's Avatar
 
City: Philadelphia
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dreamers Holiday
Vessel Model: Mainship 390
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 322
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

You need to have at least some mechanical and electrical abilities; if not, you will go broke quickly. just this past weekend the guy one slip to my right lost his steering and was about to call a mechanic in when we checked his fluid level and he was about 4 ounces low. He had a very small leak in a line, I tightened it up, filled and bled the system and saved him a couple of hundred dollars. the next day another guy on our dock was towed 10 miles at a cost of several hundred dollars because one engine would not start (why he had to be towed with one engine still working has not yet been answered) He had one battery for each engine, one was dead, and he did not know how to flip his cross over switch, nor did he know where it was!
Before you buy a boat, ask yourself some very important questions about how you maintain your house or car: do you call a plumber everytime your tiolet breaks, or a faucet leaks; do you call an electrician to install a dimmer switch; do you call the gas company when your pilot light goes out; do you call AAA when you get a flat, etc. If you answered yes to any of these questions, you boat will be a nightmare before the first week is out. Every week there will be some minor issue and as long as you can deal with those yourself without it driving you crazy, welcome to boating.
John
Mainship 390
johnma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 06:05 AM   #19
Guru
 
timjet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,905
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

Ron,

I read the book too. A couple of things to consider. The author by his own admission was not familar with boats and called a mechanic anytime something went wrong. He however became a quick learner and was repairing things himself toward the end of the cruise. Secondly, he had a lousy broker that did him no favors. Remember too that he had no plans to keep the boat at the end of the loop.*

You can avoid these pitfalls by finding a good broker, one that you can trust and has your interest at heart. You will probably have to go through several, but plan on that.

As has been mentioned, the boat will be far more costly if you call someone to fix issues that always come up. There is help to diagnoise almost anything that can go wrong. Become familar with internet sites that cater to helping one maintain their boat. Like this one and boatdiesel.com. Last week I can back from a day cruiise and the aft airconditioner stopped working. I did some simple diagonistic work on it and determined the compressor is not kicking on. I will be calling the manufactuer this morning to help me fix it. I've found the tech support at most equipment manufactures is excellent.*

I'm still at the point where I consider it a challenage to fix things and will always try before calling for help. If fixing things on a boat is something you really hate to do, owning a cruising boat will indeed be expensive.

In the end if you become so concerned that the expensive of owning a boat scares you off perhaps consider an RV or some other hobby. Just don't become one of those that regretted not owning a cruising boat and enjoying the wonderful times this hobby can provide.*

PS: Good to see your post Marin. I always learn from your posts, even though everything has already been covered!
timjet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 07:19 AM   #20
Member
 
Old Goat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 18
RE: Earnestly Seeking Advice

I want to sincerely thank everyone for their replies. You gave me very solid and sincere advice. I appreciate it very much and it gives me much to consider. You are wonderful people and I appreciate your concern for us.

As far as my age, I am 59 and my wife is 60. We have a disabled daughter (not physically) who will be with us wherever we go. So there will be three of us. We don't need fancy, just sound and functional. We want to to do the Loop and keep the boat as a livaboard. The idea is to follow the sun with the seasons. We would anchor out and use marinas as the mood suited us. I am handy with electrical systems but not engines. I can change fluids and such, but I don't know engine repair. I am a Ham radio operator and I know how to deal with radios and etc. My wife is handy at home maintenance tasks and has no problem getting dirty (she is a country girl). She has laid flooring, done tile work, painting, sanding, plumbing and toilets. She also cooks! We like traveling slow and enjoying the experience and seeing the sights.

We love being on the water and have done river trips in canoes, kayaks and etc.

We will take it slow and do our homework before we take the plunge. We have time to learn and search for what is right for us.

Blessings!

Ron
__________________

Old Goat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
USPS Course Advice, Please wizard General Discussion 57 12-21-2011 06:25 AM
Need your advice on this Fotoman General Discussion 16 09-16-2011 07:01 PM
Seeking info on Southern States/Gulf coast. Lobstah General Discussion 12 07-20-2011 04:29 AM
Advice, Please freddycycle General Discussion 4 10-12-2010 08:42 PM
advice re boat pallares General Discussion 44 07-14-2009 04:41 AM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012