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Old 05-25-2014, 03:05 PM   #21
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When underway my pilothouse doors are either shut (when it's cold) or I have netting that goes up over the doorways. There's no one to put the boat in neutral and/or come back for me, so it's imperative that I stay aboard. I'm fanatical about that.

And at anchor often the netting is up. It's not pretty, but it does keep Skipper and I inside the boat. And the netting holds the screens in place, an added benefit.



The net was from Defender. It's the stuff that sailboats use the keep their gear on deck. Rated to 300 pounds if memory serves me. But mostly it's to prevent accidental swimming. Fender hooks hold it in place -- not fancy but it works.

Another "bone to pick" -- how many boats have a way to re-board from the water? A lot do not. I worry about that. Self-rescue is imperative if you're aboard a boat.

And that step needs to be accessible from the water without assistance. None of us is getting younger and I'm certainly not more fit than I was ten years ago. So, it's got to be easy too.
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Old 05-25-2014, 03:33 PM   #22
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I have this boarding ladder but I have now just realized I have no way to deploy it from the water. I will have to get creative with some kind of ripcord, making sure you can only deploy it outside its trajectory as it would surely finish you off faster than drowning. It will also need a safety so it can't be inadvertently dropped. I don't like bungees for anything structural so I suppose some kind of pin or perhaps the method I decide to use to retract it might be the safety?

Any good ideas gratefully received!
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Old 05-25-2014, 05:36 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy View Post
Cue pictures of the Coot...
You mean this one?



Later,
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Old 05-25-2014, 05:53 PM   #24
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I have this boarding ladder but I have now just realized I have no way to deploy it from the water. I will have to get creative with some kind of ripcord, making sure you can only deploy it outside its trajectory as it would surely finish you off faster than drowning. It will also need a safety so it can't be inadvertently dropped. I don't like bungees for anything structural so I suppose some kind of pin or perhaps the method I decide to use to retract it might be the safety?

Any good ideas gratefully received!
Tractors use lynch and hitch pins to connect equipment. These pins range in size but can take quite a bit of force, far more than is required to hold up your step. I quickly searched and found these as an example, Lynch Pins, Locking Hitch Pins, Tractor Pins, Shaft Locking Pins, Tractor Linkage Parts, Farm & Tractor Accessories or Tractor Supply Co. - Enjoy browsing:Hitch Pins

These two, or something similar, or might work with some holes drilled through the ladder and its bracket. Might need to add a bushing to prevent wear on the ladder tubing though.

It looks like someone in the water would be able to reach up and disconnect the pins as long as their hands were not too cold.

Farm supply, big box hardware stores and hardware stores should have at least a few of these. Auto part stores might carry the pins in the towing section. If you find a pin that works, but more than one since it is on a matter of time before you drop one. I usually find them when I drop them on land, not sure that will be true on the water. I use a huge chunk of magnet from an old disk drive that sits on the back of the tractor to hold the pins so I am less likely to loose them when changing equipment. Looks like you have an Aluminum boat so the magnet ain't going to help ya.

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Old 05-25-2014, 06:03 PM   #25
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Heck put 2 pulleys about 4 feet apart on the upper deck and tie the rope near the middle of the ladder and thread the line through the pulleys...have a second pull down line.

Start it on it's way down via the pull down line and get off to the side and hold the line up to the pulleys....as it falls, that baby looks like it would pull you up on deck via the rope without even climbing........just kidding but a rope to a pulley near the top and controlled by the person in the water may be the only way without going to some kind of electric corded remote and a cheapo 12V ATV winch to let it down.
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Old 05-25-2014, 06:38 PM   #26
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Thank you both. I think the lifting part will be fairly easy but the release will be more of a challenge. Maybe with a counterweight so it doesn't kill the swimmer.
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Old 05-25-2014, 06:43 PM   #27
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I purchased an under-mount boarding ladder from Hopkins Carter that did the trick after seeing one on another members boat. Telescoping 3 step stainless steel and works like a champ. Easily deployed from the water.

I found out last year just how difficult it is to pull myself aboard a swim step after a leisurely swim. Hate to think it would be someone's only option at self rescue. Our marina has rescue ladders that can be easily deployed from the water too.
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Old 05-25-2014, 07:31 PM   #28
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Maverick Yacht Club in Cd'A Idaho a few years back. Shakedown cruise. Gary has his just repaired boat out and as he is very slowly coasting in goes to the back to put on fenders. Slips and falls into the water. Ends up drowning. Wear your life vests. I don't like all the mandates about everything either but they can save your life, are really comfortable now with all of the different options, and are cost effective. I even bought a belt type with manual inflation to wear around the dock when working on a boat. I doubt anyone has planned on drowning. It's called an accident.

Sorry but I have had two friends drown on boat accidents and it is close to heart.

Really good piece on drowning recognition which was the original and intended piece. Very sorry to rant on it. I wish all a safe and happy boating season.

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Old 05-25-2014, 09:45 PM   #29
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Life is full of risks...I have been on the water my whole life and have had my share of escaping helicopter dunker training more than any human should have to go through...so I am sympathetic....

Even though I have spent 35 years as a professional on or flying over the water and have seen the results of too many boating accidents to remember, I have lost way more friends, acquaintances and coworkers to health, driving and other hobby tragedies than boating.

Yes life jackets are the last step in preventing drowning but again...the risk of me drowning even though I am on the water 365 days mostly 24 hrs a day...I am more likely to drown from a dock or boarding accident than a underway boating accident. I am also way more likely to die from health or other causes than boating...both statistically and because of the way I know how to act and handle around the water situations.

For those with less time/experience...great... wear those life jackets all the time...please don't lecture me or worse...support legislation that requires it.

I would be more than glad to come into your world/profession and be happy to suggest legislation that may impact your job less than 1%.

I hope newbies learn from experienced boaters to know what the risks are and how to mitigate them and not just blindly follow absolutism because it's convenient and politically correct.
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