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Old 11-17-2015, 07:43 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Marin View Post
The Constellation, CV-64, despite being about the same size as the Navy's nuclear carriers, was not one. When we went up to the lookouts' level at night a favorite place to stand was leaning against the stack housing as it was nice and warm.

The ship was scrapped in July of this year. The experience of being aboard her for the week of filming will always be one of the highlights of my career in film/video production. Sad to think that she's gone.
When I was a teenager, my Dad (who was an Episcopal minister) gave the blessing (or whatever the term is) at the commissioning of Constellation. I got to tag along and was wide eyed and impressed.
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Old 11-17-2015, 11:18 PM   #22
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Was a plank holder on the constellation CVA 64 when she was commissioned at
Brooklyn shipyard in 1961. Seen her tip like that at sea trails and when we had a
man go overboard.
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Old 11-17-2015, 11:38 PM   #23
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I was in the ship's angles squadron (helicopters) on Enterprise on her maiden voyage & shake down to GTMO. Her speed was classified and when she commenced a tight turn we could stand upright on the deck with a hold down clamped on our britches and look down into the water. All planes were tied down (Hanger and flight deck) with a hurricane tie down. When she would heel in a turn, it was something to behold. The speeds mentioned here surprise me as her top speed was classified.
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Old 11-17-2015, 11:40 PM   #24
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Jeeeezzzzz, I'm thinking I'm not such an old fart after all! I wasent on the Connie for another ten years after you became a Plank Owner. Maybe I should modify my screen name to "Sorta Crusty Chief" .
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Old 11-18-2015, 01:02 AM   #25
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Marin-you really missed your big chance while on the Connie. You should have talked into taking you up. You cannot believe what being launched from a carrier is like. I flew backseat F-4Js in the USMC out of Cherry Point, NC. We had an annual rotation cruise with the Fleet, usually on the USS Enterprise. An F-4J has a takeoff weight of anywhere from about 52,000 to 58,000 lbs depending on armor and fuel load. Our aircraft had GE J79-10 engines at about 18,500 lbs thrust each, about 26,000 lbs each in full afterburner. Liftoff speed for the F-4J is approximately 190 knots, although coming off the front of the carrier, you are usually at about 185. The catapault accelerates a 57,000 lb aircraft from 0 to over 180 knots over about 600 feet and 3.3 seconds. It is a kick in the ass that you never forget. It is really cool to go below decks and see the cat-they are steam powered, one massive piston. I don't know how big, but imagine the mass needed to get that aircraft moving that fast that quickly. It is impressive.

True Catapault Story-around 1971, the USMC and the USAF had an exchange program where the AF would send a squadron of F-4s in to Cherry Point to become carrier qualified. We had an auxiliary airfield at Cherry Point, Bogue Field, that had a cat and arresting gear. The AF had to fly our aircraft as the AF F-4s had a weaker undercarriage than the Navy/Marine ones. The AF pilots were used to long, slow, shallow glide paths. Navy pilots bring the aircraft in and from about 75 feet or so just slam the plane to the deck, that's how you catch the arresting gear. Well, when we flew final carrier quals, we flew out to the old FDR, a WWII carrier. The AF guys could not believe how small an 800 foot ship looks from 5,000 feet! But we get everybody landed and were scheduled for launch the next morning. The first thing you get told on the cat is "Head back against the headrest, heels back against the base of the seat, and hang on to something". Well the old Martin-Baker-5 ejection seats we had had three means of ejecting, a face curtain, a lever on the right almost at the floor, and a big "D" ring between your knees. Well, the first AF pilot that launched, his backseat guy held on the the D Ring. With that accerlation his hands pulled up and he ejected himself right over the bow of the FDR! We always had two choppers in the air during operations, so they get to him pretty quickly. And fortunately for him, unhurt. A lot of ejections cause back and neck compression injuries. At the end the AF stay, at a dinner in the O Club, our CO gave him a "Premature Ejaculation" Award!
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Old 11-18-2015, 03:51 AM   #26
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We landed on the cables when we arrived and were launched off the starboard bow catapult when we went back to San Diego at the end of our week.

We had the complete run of the ship while we were on board so checked out the operation of the catapult and arresting gear systems while we were there. I found the arresting gear system more impressive (and noisy) than the catapult system.
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Old 11-18-2015, 05:17 AM   #27
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Best turn

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Originally Posted by Bob Cofer View Post
And the Nimitz...Attachment 46636
Now that is the biggest and best hard turn I have seen!
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Old 11-18-2015, 09:37 AM   #28
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Crust Chief, you know your old when you met a retired chief that did his 20 after you retired. But pay backs are sweet after drawing $54 a month as E-1.
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:23 AM   #29
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Thanks for sharing guys.
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:47 AM   #30
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I was in the ship's angles squadron (helicopters) on Enterprise on her maiden voyage & shake down to GTMO.

Which squadron?
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Old 11-18-2015, 12:02 PM   #31
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Sailor son informs me

It takes roughly 400 gallons of water, converted into steam for each cat launch!

Quote:
Originally Posted by THD View Post
Marin-you really missed your big chance while on the Connie. You should have talked into taking you up. You cannot believe what being launched from a carrier is like. I flew backseat F-4Js in the USMC out of Cherry Point, NC. We had an annual rotation cruise with the Fleet, usually on the USS Enterprise. An F-4J has a takeoff weight of anywhere from about 52,000 to 58,000 lbs depending on armor and fuel load. Our aircraft had GE J79-10 engines at about 18,500 lbs thrust each, about 26,000 lbs each in full afterburner. Liftoff speed for the F-4J is approximately 190 knots, although coming off the front of the carrier, you are usually at about 185. The catapault accelerates a 57,000 lb aircraft from 0 to over 180 knots over about 600 feet and 3.3 seconds. It is a kick in the ass that you never forget. It is really cool to go below decks and see the cat-they are steam powered, one massive piston. I don't know how big, but imagine the mass needed to get that aircraft moving that fast that quickly. It is impressive.

True Catapault Story-around 1971, the USMC and the USAF had an exchange program where the AF would send a squadron of F-4s in to Cherry Point to become carrier qualified. We had an auxiliary airfield at Cherry Point, Bogue Field, that had a cat and arresting gear. The AF had to fly our aircraft as the AF F-4s had a weaker undercarriage than the Navy/Marine ones. The AF pilots were used to long, slow, shallow glide paths. Navy pilots bring the aircraft in and from about 75 feet or so just slam the plane to the deck, that's how you catch the arresting gear. Well, when we flew final carrier quals, we flew out to the old FDR, a WWII carrier. The AF guys could not believe how small an 800 foot ship looks from 5,000 feet! But we get everybody landed and were scheduled for launch the next morning. The first thing you get told on the cat is "Head back against the headrest, heels back against the base of the seat, and hang on to something". Well the old Martin-Baker-5 ejection seats we had had three means of ejecting, a face curtain, a lever on the right almost at the floor, and a big "D" ring between your knees. Well, the first AF pilot that launched, his backseat guy held on the the D Ring. With that accerlation his hands pulled up and he ejected himself right over the bow of the FDR! We always had two choppers in the air during operations, so they get to him pretty quickly. And fortunately for him, unhurt. A lot of ejections cause back and neck compression injuries. At the end the AF stay, at a dinner in the O Club, our CO gave him a "Premature Ejaculation" Award!
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Old 11-18-2015, 08:28 PM   #32
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Crust Chief, you know your old when you met a retired chief that did his 20 after you retired. But pay backs are sweet after drawing $54 a month as E-1.
$54 bucks in 61? You were living large! I thought I was rich getting $205 with free room and board in 72.
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Old 11-18-2015, 09:29 PM   #33
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Here's a photo I took of the Intrepid in 1971 just before the flight deck went under water. we commented at the time that we were unrepping with an extremely large sub
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:52 PM   #34
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John,

What ship were you on? I was on USS Sacramento AOE-1, we unrepped most everything that floated and was painted grey.
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Old 11-19-2015, 06:19 AM   #35
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The difference between a Sea Story and a Fairy Tale,,

The Fairy take begins , "Once Upon a Time"

The Sea Story begins , Now this is No SH**.

Best 60's sea story from Approach was of a night cat shot where the controls were hooked up backwards.

Mfg error in using same sized fitting in hyd setup.

The Naval Aviator figured it out (at 80 ft) and was able to get back aboard.

Thats why the Navy and Marines train Aviators , not pilots like the Army and Air Force..
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:42 AM   #36
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Great memories guys, It's good to see so many on the site.
I got my start as Pipefitter, civilan employee working for DOD at Philadelphia Naval shipyard in the early 80's. Under Ronald Regan the Navy went to a 600 ship fleet which created a ton of work at ship yards nationwide. I had the opportunity to work on many FF's DDG's. I remember doing the tank level indicators on the Wisconsin. The main work load was the SLEP program, Serviice life extension program for most of the convential steam carriers. The refit was supposed to give the carriiers an additional 15 years of service life. I think the first two carriers the yard worked on were were the Forresthall and Saratoga followed by America, Independence, Connie. A lot of fond memories. The two things that impressed me were seeing the Wisconsin in dry dock, the majority of the ship sits below the water line, very impressive. The second was being amazed that these vessels would float .The amont of pipe, steal, crome molly, copper nickel, stainless on a carrier was amazing. I spent two years fitting pipe in the bildge of engine room three on the independece. Every day, six days a week and never got out of the bilge.
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Old 11-19-2015, 11:41 AM   #37
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Here's a photo I took of the Intrepid in 1971 just before the flight deck went under water. we commented at the time that we were unrepping with an extremely large sub
John
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I was flying Sea King helicopters off Intrepid in that time frame. Might not be the same storm, but the ship was supporting a cold weather NATO operation called Snowy Beach off the coast of Maine. A hurricane came up the coast and the ship had to run ahead of the storm because the Captain was afraid to turn the old rust bucket. All but a couple S-2's were tied down on the hangar deck. Green water over the bow, tie yourself in your rack stuff. One of the S-2's got tore all to hell. A day into the run south, an escort destroyer called that they had a crew member who was badly injured in the heavy weather and they had to get him to the carrier's sick bay. So they dragged one of our H3's up to the flight deck. I started the engines and threw all the switches for the hydraulic blade spread. The system was struggling, so the deck crew who had left the tiedowns on the blade tips helped drag and stabilize them into the locked position. We had wind gust in the 65 knot range on the airspeed indicator and the ship was barely making way. Got it cranked up without incident, and that old pig fairly leaped off the deck with only a tiny bit of collective pitch. Ended up hoisting the injured sailor in a litter from the destroyer (no helicopter deck), which was pitching and heaving wildly. Wouldn't have attempted a landing even if they had a landing area. Got back to the carrier and except for the damaged S-2s we had the whole place to ourselves. Normal landing spot was forward on the angle deck. Air Boss said put it wherever you like, Lieutenant. We picked a spot exactly mid-ships to minimize pitching motion, but the heave was still an interesting synchronization exercise. All's well that ended well.

Years later I was an engineering test pilot out of the Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent River and aboard the Connie doing an envelope recertification for the H-3 landing envelope. There had been a number of accidents over the years resulting from loss of tail rotor control power in adverse winds. So we had the carrier out looking for the nastiest weather they could find...winds and waves. Never got close to what we saw on Intrepid ten years earlier, but still plenty scary as we were focused on night ops. The landing spot at the very end of the bow was a nightmare as it was moving 50-60 feet vertically at a high rate. The trick was to get in synch with the ship and slam the aircraft onto the deck right at the end of the downward motion. Time it wrong and the ship came up and slammed the snot out of the landing gear. After nearly punching a strut up through the sponson, we eliminated that spot for night landings. Of course the other problem was on a black murky night there was zero visual reference for the pilot other than out the side windows or the chin windows.

Worked off of eleven carriers from the 70s through the early 80's.
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Old 11-19-2015, 05:56 PM   #38
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Crust Chief, you know your old when you met a retired chief that did his 20 after you retired.
Did exactly that back in the spring. What a humbling experience.

Marty..................
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Old 11-19-2015, 10:13 PM   #39
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John,

What ship were you on? I was on USS Sacramento AOE-1, we unrepped most everything that floated and was painted grey.
Bob
I was on the Santa Barbara AE28. I was a plankowner and served on her from 70 to 72.
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Old 11-19-2015, 10:30 PM   #40
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My brother was on the flight deck of the Enterprise in January of 69 when the missile launched on the flight deck and started the fire. He was blown off the deck and landed 70 feet down in the water along with several other guys. He was in the water for 18 hours until they found him and fished them out. I was in boot camp at the time. Me and another guy in our boot company (744) had brother missing in that fire. They had us sit in the chaplains office for two days waiting for news. They found my brother alive and his brothers body..
John
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