Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-04-2015, 12:19 AM   #81
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,573
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbevins View Post
Is it a Rocna grapple?...
Could it be a Rocna Grappa?
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 02:52 AM   #82
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
I enjoyed all the airplane landing comments, I just wonder how well a plane would land if the runway was moving with a 3 or 4 knot current.
I somewhat take exception to the wind and current being referred to as "threats", I am sure that they can be at times but not always.
dan
ANYTHING that can be a threat "sometimes" should be considered a threat ALL the time. I realize you can use some adverse conditions to your advantage. But generally, wind and tide are a threat to your operation. Even in your example, the tide was a threat until it shifted in the other direction. Your master knew the threat....and he waited for it to minimize.
__________________

__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 03:08 AM   #83
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,633
And as far as the questions of "how did you get good...."....
My answer would be humility. You never ever assume that you are good or that you have mastered the art. You are in a continuous state of trying to master it.

The drummer for Rush, Neil Peart, said it perfectly in an interview. The interviewer asked him if he ever got tired of playing the song "Tom Sawyer" in concert. His Answer......"No because I haven't played it perfectly yet!!!".....and he wrote the song!!!!
There is a lot to be learned in that simple statement!!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 07:12 AM   #84
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,996
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 11:57 AM   #85
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
And as far as the questions of "how did you get good...."....
My answer would be humility. You never ever assume that you are good or that you have mastered the art. You are in a continuous state of trying to master it.

The drummer for Rush, Neil Peart, said it perfectly in an interview. The interviewer asked him if he ever got tired of playing the song "Tom Sawyer" in concert. His Answer......"No because I haven't played it perfectly yet!!!".....and he wrote the song!!!!
There is a lot to be learned in that simple statement!!!!


That's a great quote. The way I saw it, every flight is just a series of thousands and thousands of corrections, most we never think about and a few we can never forget. No flight ever came off without a mistake being made in some small way. Most mistakes are subsequently compensated for, but they occurred nonetheless.

After each flight, I'd review my significant mistakes in my mind as a sort of personal skills inventory and devise a way to prevent it in the future...much like a flight instructor would review a student's performance.

Boating is much the same...a series of corrections and recorrections. I make mistakes and then I correct. Sometimes along the way, I learn how to avoid the mistake in the first place, but without a plan, it ain't gonna happen by chance.

This weekend I was at a fishing club campout. One of the new guys was having troubles maneuvering and handling his new-to-him 23 ft cuddy and asked for help. So I went out with him and observed his operation, then made suggestions on how I'd do it differently. He was very receptive and saw an immediate improvement in his performance which led to greater confidence.

Then we came in to the marina to dock. It seems that every docking event is a near-emergency with this guy and he keeps blaming his wife for not doing it right. As it turns out, this guy has ZERO anticipation skills. He only reacts to events and does not plan ahead in his mind to avoid problems. He never discusses what he needs or expects from his wife while docking. It's like he expects it all to go well by chance! I've never met a boater like him before but I'm sure there are plenty out there.
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 12:17 PM   #86
Curmudgeon
 
BaltimoreLurker's Avatar
 
City: Stoney Creek, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moon Dance
Vessel Model: 1974 34' Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,631
Sort of like learning to sail. Learning to sail takes maybe an hour. Learning to sail well takes the rest of your life.
BaltimoreLurker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 12:47 PM   #87
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
It seems that every docking event is a near-emergency with this guy and he keeps blaming his wife for not doing it right. As it turns out, this guy has ZERO anticipation skills. He only reacts to events and does not plan ahead in his mind to avoid problems. He never discusses what he needs or expects from his wife while docking. It's like he expects it all to go well by chance! I've never met a boater like him before but I'm sure there are plenty out there.
I think there are a lot of those out there. I(we) take for granted our aviation background and how important it is to brief everyone that is participating in the event. One of my passengers once asked me if flying big planes has any relation to operating a boat. And my answer was that that it certainly helps. Not necessarily the immediate dynamics of it all....but the mindset. I get into much hairyer situations in an airplane where the consequences of mistakes are obviously extreme. Like I said in 2008 when this thread was started....you have to know your threats and you have to have a plan to mitigate/eliminate those threats. And you must brief those involved with how you are going to execute that plan and be open to suggestions. And if you get into an "Unsafe Aircraft State"(UAS) you have to be able to recover. Recovery is your last chance at avoiding an incident/accident. That is when you have to "do some of that pilot shit".

As the saying goes.....a superior pilot uses his superior judgement so he does not have to use/rely on his superior skill!!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 01:27 PM   #88
Guru
 
Heron's Avatar
 
City: Cypress Landing Marina (NC)
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Heron (2)
Vessel Model: '88 Cape Dory 28 Flybridge #115
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
It seems that every docking event is a near-emergency with this guy and he keeps blaming his wife for not doing it right. As it turns out, this guy has ZERO anticipation skills. He only reacts to events and does not plan ahead in his mind to avoid problems.
Amen....I always instruct my crew on what is about to happen and what they need to do. (Plus, by bow thruster makes me look like a genius every time!!)
__________________
Steve
Heron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 04:57 PM   #89
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
If it's just my wife and I on the boat we know what needs to be done in a docking situation so well that regardless of who's driving and who's the "deckhand" we rarely have to actually say anything to each other as we're executing the maneuver aside from the deckhand letting the driver know when such-and-such a line is attached. Or in the case of pivoting backwards out of a tight spot while being blown onto the dock, the driver tells the person with the bow breast line when to release and haul it in as the boat backs off.

And since we always drive from the lower helm, communication is easy since both of us are only a few feet apart.

When we have guests and we feel that they are competent to help in a challenging docking situation (which is the only kind of guest we allow on the boat anyway) the rule is that whichever one of us (me or my wife) is being the "deckhand" he or she has charge over the helpers. The driver just drives and communicates only with the deckhand.

We have found that this eliminates conflicting orders and this confusion on the part of our "assistants."

Prior to every docking or departure other than our home slip my wife and I discuss the situation and what our plan of approach (or departure) is prior to executing the actual maneuver. If there are options or "what happens if?" questions we figure them out beforehand.

If we have guests, whoever the deckhand is tells each guest exactly what their task is, why they're doing it, and what their actions area supposed to result in.

So far in all the years we've been doing this, it's worked great.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2015, 05:55 PM   #90
Senior Member
 
rclarke246's Avatar
 
City: Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Lady Di
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 279
Quote:
Then we came in to the marina to dock. It seems that every docking event is a near-emergency with this guy and he keeps blaming his wife for not doing it right. As it turns out, this guy has ZERO anticipation skills. He only reacts to events and does not plan ahead in his mind to avoid problems. He never discusses what he needs or expects from his wife while docking. It's like he expects it all to go well by chance! I've never met a boater like him before but I'm sure there are plenty out there.
_______________
Looks to me like this guy's wife should be well on her way to becoming a "former boater".
I guess when he's singlehanded he'll blame the person who's not there!
__________________

rclarke246 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1963 31' Cheoy Lee Monterey Clipper "Troller" (Trawler) chiropaul Classifieds 8 01-06-2012 09:52 AM
36 ft, 69' Vega/pilot, hull #5,"Dulcinea" (prev "Hornblower"), a newbie to TF baggins General Discussion 5 05-08-2011 09:41 AM
Add Rolling Chocks to a "hard chine" Taiwanese Trawler? AKdadio General Discussion 12 04-03-2011 02:32 PM
For those who asked - my ships wheel is "Brown Bros Rosebank Edinburgh" 7tiger7 General Discussion 1 02-28-2011 03:36 PM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012