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Old 05-02-2015, 07:27 PM   #61
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We're learning about this important aspect of boating and offer the following:
Twin screws, bow thruster.

1) Establish good communication with crew. Radio headsets are great! No need for her to yell when she can cuss me out in a normal voice. Radios allow this.

2) When docking, I'm in neutral 80% of the time- offering only appropriate short bursts, much like a capsule in space.

3) No jumping onto dock. I get vessel close she get her secured. Fine tuning of the lines can happen later.

4) She gives specific instruction to "helpers" who may appear. They almost never listen, though.

5) Never get your hand or finger in the loop as it is dropped over the cleat! Her fingertip was 2/3 severed! She was distracted as the vessel was nearing the "end" of it's fixed spring line.
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:36 PM   #62
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OUCH!
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:30 PM   #63
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Dang man!
That looks painful


You're right.
Hands and feet clear of all objects at all time.


Had a crew member trying to "help" dock a small boat we were on, in high wind and rough water conditions once. She kept sitting on the dock, and placing her foot between the gunnel and the dock "to keep us away."


We really do have it under control, and I keep telling her to remove her feet/hands from between the two before she loses a body part!!


Hope your lady is doing well with that injury.

OD
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Old 05-02-2015, 08:59 PM   #64
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This happened in late March.

She applied direct pressure (she's a nurse) and I immediately drove her to the the local urgent care, which was open that Sunday evening. We arrived around 5:15!

They took her in quickly and the doctor used 10 stitches. The nail is a wait-and-see situation. The fingertip is still numb but seems to be healing great.

BTW- I was amazed that the dish cloth she pressed on the wound had very little blood- probably less than an ounce! Direct pressure was the reason, I'm sure.

I (we) had never been cautioned about this but it was a tough lesson-learned!

Thanks for the well wishes.
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Old 05-02-2015, 09:23 PM   #65
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Quick thinking on her part.
It was one of the first lessons I learned way back when I had hair-LOL.


Hell of a way to learn, but neither one of you will ever forget.
Thoughts and prayers for a full recovery.

OD
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Old 05-02-2015, 10:26 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
One problem with docking with only one method, or relying on lines to get and keep the boat alongside.....is you are setting yourself up for failure when cruising as all the tricks in the book need to be practiced regularly.
I don't know about you boys, but for me getting on the VHF and saying "I'm not very good at docking" brings out all the help one could imagine. And then if the landing is less than spectacular I'm already covered.

But if it's picture perfect I can smile and say "Thanks boys"

For the record, I'm not the best at docking and along side works great for me. Backing into a slip scares the bejeebers out of me! Of course I can bow in and then swap her around with lines. There is a distinct advantage to having a small boat.

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Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
I can reach out the helm window to grab the line, but my midship cleat is about 2 meters foreword. Slipping the line on there is probably more difficult than reaching the dock cleat.
I was going to move the cleat further back but the aft end of the boat doesn't pull into the dock nearly as well.
Ditto on Seaweed when I bought her. The forward cleat was near the bow and the dinky toy pretend cleat only useful for a fender was just aft of the pilothouse doors.

One of the first things I did was add two proper sized cleats about a foot forward of the doors. Seaweed has doors on both port and starboard so docking is not too problematic. Helm is on center.

And if it were looking like an issue, I'd just anchor. That's easy.

Also, I go slow -- which is sometimes a problem (not enough forward momentum) ... It's something I need to practice at a deserted dock once this new engine install is complete.
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Old 05-02-2015, 11:16 PM   #67
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rclarke246:
Rt. Hand Communication finger February, 2015 Dominican Republic. Removing anchor chain from gypsy without double checking anchor. From entering to exiting the E. Room at the local Midico was 20 minutes cost $0.00. They asked for my name when I was leaving. Same numbness, etc...and # of stitches.
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Old 05-02-2015, 11:19 PM   #68
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Your right Janice. We rarely "have to" dock in a particular place or method.

You have a distinct advantage, though. You don't have a male ego to get in the way.

I occasionally suck it up and dock (or anchor) wherever is easiest, and wait it out until the winds become more favourable.
Radioing for assistance would be a struggle though. It's a bit like asking for directions when driving. I prefer to wander around lost for hours.
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Old 05-02-2015, 11:40 PM   #69
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We use this when hooking up to oil platforms for bottom fishing. a 10' piece of pvc pipe, a 1/2" rope with a loop the piece of garden hose keeps the loop open to fit over a cleat or even a piling. It would be a big help docking, I recently made a smaller one using vinyl coated SS wire instead of rope it works well too. it has a large loop about 20" dia on one end for pilings and a smaller loop on the other end for lock pins or cleats I don't have a picture of it now but will post in a few days. Of course a bow thruster and a big rudder help on a single engine boat.
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:10 AM   #70
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Ray is on Mahalo Moi's port stern quarter, a guard position he took when we departed (with single engine) Pittsburg Marina at our March TF get-together. It was a tight squeeze, only inches separated our boats and despite my boat's starboard prop walk, no fending off was necessary. I took a similar position on my starboard stern quarter when Ray arrived after I a day earlier. Ray's expert handling his boat's twin engines made fending unnecessary too. ... Everyone's waiting for the Coot to toot its horns.


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Old 05-03-2015, 01:52 AM   #71
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Well thank you for that picture Koot... I now have a serious case of Cary'D Away transom envy. And the beautiful pup on the swim platform looks right at home too. [A tuna-door is on the someday wish list.]

Life is good afloat, isn't it?
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Old 05-03-2015, 05:18 AM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Ray is on Mahalo Moi's port stern quarter, a guard position he took when we departed (with single engine) Pittsburg Marina at our March TF get-together. It was a tight squeeze, only inches separated our boats and despite my boat's starboard prop walk, no fending off was necessary. I took a similar position on my starboard stern quarter when Ray arrived after I a day earlier. Ray's expert handling his boat's twin engines made fending unnecessary too. ... Everyone's waiting for the Coot to toot its horns.


..."toot its horns"? Heck, we're standing around preparing to hold on to loose objects that fall off our boats when you "unleash" your horns!!!
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Old 05-03-2015, 08:54 AM   #73
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With 2 screws and a bow thruster I have never used the rudders in docking.
I suppose that if I knew what I was doing their implementation could be a benefit, especially in strong cross wind or current. Remember, we're new at this stuff.

Stern-in, it makes sense that the aft edges on the rudders should "point" the way in, right? (I have a rudder indicator to lessen the confusion)

Oh, as an aside, when preparing to cast off, we rig 2 short temporary lines, doubled- back, to hold the boat close to the finger pier. Once we're ready we find it easy to deal with just these 2, from the boat of course.

Thank you for all your tips! We need all the help we can get.
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Old 05-03-2015, 09:30 AM   #74
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Great book:

http://www.amazon.com/Powerboat-Hand...+boat+handling
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Old 05-03-2015, 11:35 AM   #75
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With 2 screws and a bow thruster I have never used the rudders in docking.
We have a twin and almost always use the rudders while maneuvering. They make the boat vastly more maneuverable. With the rudders, power and a single spring line we can pin the boat to a dock even with a strong wind or current (or both) pushing us off the dock.

The use of the rudders and differential thrust and a bow line ready to slip lets us get off a dock with a wind pushing us hard onto it and boats moored immediately ahead of and behind us.

The rudders and differential thrust let us pivot the boat much faster and more positively than differential thrust alone.

More recently, after observing the maneuvering of the commercial fish boats and tugs in our harbor, we introduced the use of power into our maneuvering, sometimes with both engines, more often with just one in combination with differential thrust. This opened up a hole new level of versatility when maneuvering and is one reason we will never own a single engine boat. Playing with two engines, transmissions and the rudders is way more fun. (We have run single engine boats so know the difference in maneuvering versatility).
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Old 05-03-2015, 12:42 PM   #76
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I posted on an earlier thread regarding a similar topic. On our smaller single screw boat without any additional docking equipment, we have found a simple solution. As I operate from the fly bridge when docking a small mountaineer grappling hook was purchased which has its own 35 foot nylon line. We contain this in a small bucket with holes cut in the bottom next to the helm. When approaching in a comfortable mode and close to the dock I heave this grapple hook out over the bull rail or if the dock is clear and no bull rail, over the other side of the dock or float. I can walk forward and back as deemed necessary, acting like a bow or stern thruster to a degree. Tie off on a center board cleat and then proceed to full line handling.
Lots of surprised dock watchers as the grapple hook sails over the side! Yes, I clear the range before firing!!
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Old 05-03-2015, 02:48 PM   #77
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Quote:
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I posted on an earlier thread regarding a similar topic. On our smaller single screw boat without any additional docking equipment, we have found a simple solution. As I operate from the fly bridge when docking a small mountaineer grappling hook was purchased which has its own 35 foot nylon line. We contain this in a small bucket with holes cut in the bottom next to the helm. When approaching in a comfortable mode and close to the dock I heave this grapple hook out over the bull rail or if the dock is clear and no bull rail, over the other side of the dock or float. I can walk forward and back as deemed necessary, acting like a bow or stern thruster to a degree. Tie off on a center board cleat and then proceed to full line handling.
Lots of surprised dock watchers as the grapple hook sails over the side! Yes, I clear the range before firing!!
Al- Ketchikan
Wow! What if there is a vessel on the other side of a pier? I guess the answer lies in making a very controlled toss from close in.
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Old 05-03-2015, 10:42 PM   #78
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Is it a Rocna grapple?
Sorry I just had to ask.
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Old 05-03-2015, 11:24 PM   #79
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My home slip is a double fingered one. I came home from my maiden voyage single handing Stillwater today. A couple of folks came to my slip to help - it was nice of them - however there's nothing for them to do really. Attempting to fend off would be downright suicidal and once I'm in and stopped the boat isn't going anywhere. So I can just as easily step off and tie up as have someone do it for me. Now if I am trying to dock on a side tie where either wind or current is blowing me off, I would be very happy for a couple of people to be there to grab lines and make them fast.

The challenge for me is that the slip is only 2' wider than my boat and there are two concrete pilings on the ends of the fingers. There's usually a cross wind blowing too - so getting the bow between them is a challenge - and I have a large overhang - so I'll hit the pilings well before the boat touches the dock.

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Old 05-03-2015, 11:35 PM   #80
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Not a Rocna, However, one could cut off one of the fingers, bend a couple of the other fingers,chrome plate it, add a section of chain to weight down the scope of the heaving line and you may have a close copy of an "Eric" approved Rocna. Be careful though because of you don't read the instructions, you can easily hit the boat on the other side of the dock. Like don't read "Clear the range before firing" in the first post.

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