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Old 01-02-2013, 05:02 PM   #21
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Don't make it harder than it is...as jeffnick suggested (which is really only an after bow spring like I suggested earlier)...figure a way to get a line on a piling at the end of the finger dock and with a little practice you'll be in clean every time.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:27 PM   #22
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Best to invest money and time for dock/boat protection first so you do not have a fit/heart attack coming against the dock. There is nothing wrong with coming up against the dock if that is what you plan on. Watch the profession commercial as they most of the time come against the dock and thrust the stern over. Were the Eagle's bow usually hits, 10 ft long area, I have beefed up the dock protection/fenders, so I can come against the dock and thrust the stern over. If the bow is already against the dock before thrusting there is usually no damage.

The problem with spring lines is reaching/getting the line to the dock which may not be done with out the boat close/up against the dock. You don't have to actually get the line around the piling just looped over. Our old slip, Lake union, we had a spring line for the stern so the stern would not get push/drift to far over. However the boat had to be to mid cleat and up agsint the dock to reach the line. We also had/have a 3 ft diameter ball fender to put between the neighbors boat and the bow as the bow usually swung over as the stern was thrust against the dock. 75% of the pucker factor was getting the bow into the slip, and thrust the stern over against the dock.

Basically I have given up on spring lines and depend mostly on dock protection and fenders. So the hull gets banged/bumped once in a while, but itís a lot less stressful and no body gets hurt.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:48 PM   #23
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[asically I have given up on spring lines and depend mostly on dock protection and fenders. [/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]So the hull gets banged/bumped once in a while, but it’s a lot less stressful and no body gets hurt.
That's known as the Braille method of docking a boat.

Spring lines are wonderful things once one learns how to use them properly. And a permanent one at one's home slip can make docking a non-event in just about any kind of wind or current. Ours has made a huge difference in our boating, particularly for my wife who until we installed the spring on our float was apprehensive and nervous every time we came home. Now she doesn't worry about it at all.
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:12 PM   #24
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That's known as the Braille method of docking a boat.

Spring lines are wonderful things once one learns how to use them properly. And a permanent one at one's home slip can make docking a non-event in just about any kind of wind or current. Ours has made a huge difference in our boating, particularly for my wife who until we installed the spring on our float was apprehensive and nervous every time we came home. Now she doesn't worry about it at all.
I agree they work if you can reach them. The Eagle bow is 10 ft off the water, mid gate and stern are 6+ ft off the water. Also some boats are to heavy to man handle if the conditions are not right. My wife never worrried as she said I did enough for both of US. Besides If I bang/markded up her boat, I was the one that fix it. I do not mind the paint as much as breaking/marrning the varnish as that requires stripping and 6+ coats.
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Old 01-02-2013, 07:27 PM   #25
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Jarod
i saw your post yesterday but didn't get a chance to respond. i really like Captain K's sugestion and I have seen it used many times. It is really simple and it is amazing how well it works. As long as noe of your neighbors don't stick out past their pilings, just lay your boat up against the piling and follow his instructions (you will be backing into your slip instead of bow in). Anyone in our area that has twins and loses one for any reason uses this method.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:36 AM   #26
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One added tip - To minimize prop walk, once you get her moving backwards, put the transmission in neutral. She will continue to coast backwards but you won't have prop walk to deal with.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:44 AM   #27
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Gary,
I think that holds true for most of us that aren't overpropped just by going to idle.
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:32 PM   #28
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Gary,
I think that holds true for most of us that aren't overpropped just by going to idle.
I'm not overpropped and I have significant propwalk even in idle.

Can never go wrong if you learn the proper use of spring lines...makes single handling like you were a crew of 4-5...
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:41 PM   #29
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I don't know that I have no propwalk at all either but it seems to be the case w my 40hp boat and single 18" prop. Plenty of propwalk w plenty of throttle though.

I assumed the comment by Gary "once you get her moving backwards" would be speed enough to unload the prop and an unloaded prop can't walk.
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Old 01-04-2013, 01:26 PM   #30
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Have propwalk at whatever engine speed, forward or reverse, idle or full-speed or in between, but much more noticeable in reverse. None is noticeable when transmission is in neutral and the boat is coasting, however. Makes sense when one thinks what causes propwalk.

At forward cruising speed, I need to have a left-three-degree rudder to maintain a straight course. When shifting into neutral, need to adjust to zero-degree rudder.

Rudder at zero-degrees (read-out to the right of the AutoNav):

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Old 01-04-2013, 02:49 PM   #31
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With my trawler, my best approach was steering and gearing. In and out of gear - no throttle.
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Old 01-04-2013, 03:04 PM   #32
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With my trawler, my best approach was steering and gearing. In and out of gear - no throttle.
I used to do it that way. Finally after years of watching tugs and lobsterboats and seine boats maneuver slickly and quickly when docking it finally dawned on me what I'd been watching but hadn't seen, and that's the use of power in close-in maneuvering, and sometimes lots of it.

So I started using power as a maneuvering tool a year or so ago and what a fantastic tool it is. It has brought a whole new dimension to our maneuvering that can make things easier, faster, and more controlled. I have a lot yet to learn with regards to using power in close-in maneuvering but since adding it to the "repertoire" we can do so much more under a much wider range of wind and current conditions than we could using shifters and rudders only.
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Old 01-04-2013, 03:10 PM   #33
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There you go Marin.

All of what you said and three more things.

Practice, practice, practice.

The older you get the better you get.

sd
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:26 PM   #34
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Spinning my boat 180 degrees in it's own length...even with a knot or so of current or 10-15 knots of wind is easy if I'm willing to use 1000-1200 rpm bursts to kick the stern where I need it. (maybe even more throttle if conditions dictate). If docking conditions are going to be too much more challenging...I tell the dockmaster I'm a single, no bow thruster and they put me someplace else.

Even though I can get tighter in worse conditions...they don't know that and appreciate the info and the lesser worry of making it easier on everyone.
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:08 PM   #35
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Spring lines are your friend. Unless in an unusual situation, we put a spring line ashore first. It is an emergency brake, and can give better control of the boat.

If you will look carefully at the largest size of the attached photo, you will see 2 spring lines coiled and ready on the rail of Moonstruck. That is standard procedure for us.

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Old 01-05-2013, 11:46 AM   #36
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Have you tried more speed? With a full keel, and a bit of water flowing over the rudder, you should be able to minimize the effects of wind by limiting it's contribution in both proportion and duration. Try coming in at a shallow angle with a bit of speed. Then use the rudder to get the boat's stern turning into the dock. Finally, back with a bit of power to stop both the forward momentum and the rotation. Usually you'll end up with a bit of drift in the direction of the dock, which I find helpful, especially when single-handling as this gives me time to get midships and get a line on.

Coming out with a bit more aggression might also help. Here, give a strong, short burst of reverse to get her moving out of the slip quickly, and then use short forward bursts with the rudder hard over to get her rotating as you clear the pier, with short, strong bursts of reverse to keep her backing. You should be able to leave the rudder hard over as it's probably not going to have much affect in reverse.

My sailboat had a small motor and prop, so I was never able to get away with simply shifting in and out of gear at idle. I also had to learn to apply power before I thought I needed it because the little one-lung diesel took a bit of time to respond to the throttle. When the currents were also working against me, I'd also walk the boat halfway out of the slip.
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Old 01-05-2013, 01:25 PM   #37
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My bow does tend to blow off quite quickly if standing for anytime at all in any sort of wind. I usually have my two young girls (2 and 3 yrs old) screaming for mom behind me in the pilothouse as I come in and on occasion I will just tell mom to deal with the kids and I will single hand the boat in. There is also a fair amount of current in our marina which complicates the matter further. I vary my approach with the slow and easy taking the tranny in and out of gear at idle. The times I come in "hot" so to speak are to deal with a strong wind off the starboard bow or a strong current. I always prefer the slow and easy approach if its possible.
Jarod, your boat sounds like my 36' Cape George cutter in terms of the underbody. It took me about 5 years (slow learner here), but I eventually discovered that I could turn her in her own length by putting the tiller over hard, throwing her into reverse and once the bow stopped turning in reference to a fixed point at the dock or on land, put her back into forward with some gas to get the boat to continue to rotate. Once I felt I was starting to move forward, back into reverse and by repeating this I could spin her around in her own length, without ever moving the rudder (turns out to be the key to the whole opeation).

The reason for noting this is that slow and easy works sometimes, but not very well when docking a full keel sailboat that perhaps some on this thread haven't done all that much of. You need to be making some headway or the rudder is useless, so trying to visualize your situation, I would bring the vessel in, rotate her so I could approach the slip from a 30 degree angle or so, then power into the slip 'hot', using reverse and the rudder hard over to counter prop walk with prop wash against the rudder.

Getting out is a whole other story since you don't have any way on so can't do much other than fend off. Since full keel boats rarely back well, you're probably stuck with the fenders.

I've made the above technique work all the way up to an 85' 100+ ton river barge, docking with the current using just power with the rudder hard over. Have to come in hot, which can freak bystanders out a bit, but it works.
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Old 01-05-2013, 02:41 PM   #38
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I love the layout of your panel. The ship's compass is smack in the middle of your view. Also, the Floscan is where it can be easily monitored. Well done!
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Old 01-05-2013, 03:01 PM   #39
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I love the layout of your panel. The ship's compass is smack in the middle of your view. Also, the Floscan is where it can be easily monitored. Well done!
Thanks. The builder customized the upper-panel layout based on my input.
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:09 PM   #40
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Jarod,

This article was very helpful to me http://www.his.com/~vann/KrgStuff/manuvrng.htm

Mark,

My compliments also on the panel. I saved a pic for my own remodel someday.
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