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Old 06-21-2012, 02:56 PM   #21
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I dont see a pic of a ship?
The photographer (me) took the photo from the ship. The ship was leaving and beginning to retrieve its lines.
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Old 06-21-2012, 09:58 PM   #22
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Well I used to do a fair bit of ship line handling in my Navy days and would agree that Mr. Culotta's methodology is correct... for a ship. I'm surprised Marin hasn't chimed in and mentioned that 90 percent of the tie-ups on the inside passage is either a bull rail or a galvanized ring. I'd prefer to deal with the bitter end in that case.

I have permanent lines in my slip and a (few) set of lines I cruise with.

Cheers.
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Old 06-21-2012, 10:17 PM   #23
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When cruising, I agree with Charles 100% and that is the method I use. Probably because I work out of the area Charles lives in. We both know lots and lots of shrimpers and Oil Field boat people. And the way he described the procedure is the only way I have seen it done in the Gulf.
When in my home dock I do the opposite. I leave the eyes on the boat end of the line. Pull up to dock and drop the eyes in place. I went back this morning and changed my lines back to this configuration. Tomorrow I will be making my cruising lines from the cut-offs. MY Mainship has smaller cleats than my sailboat. At best, I can only get 2 lines on a single cleat if I use wrapping. If I use eyes, my boat cleats will easily take 3 eyes.
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Old 06-21-2012, 10:20 PM   #24
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What is a "Bull Rail"?

Not familiar with that terminology.
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Old 06-21-2012, 11:08 PM   #25
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Not familiar with that terminology.
A low-level continuous rail (usually a 4"x 4") along the edge of a dock or float intermittently blocked up (with a chunk of 4" x 4")to provide clear passage of boat mooring lines between the bottom of the rail and the dock. Sometimes made of welded steel as well.

The advantage is you can tie up anywhere along the rail with a clove hitch.

Ever hear of a log dog?
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:45 AM   #26
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Thanks NS, that is what I suspected it was. Just never knew the name. I have worked on boats that have them.

Never heard of a log dog in the nautical world. Only in the logging world.
Sooooooooooooo, I give up. What is a Log Dog?
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:37 AM   #27
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Growing up on the water here in North Carolina and being my dads deckhand and bait boy. I had tried many ways trying to aviod his advice. His boats spent the summer in NC. and then went to Fla for the winter, When in transit he had the lines eye on the deck cleat. The lines were long enough i could depending on the wind and tide toss the line over a dock cleat or piling and secure the end i still had and work to the other end. When leaving the dock i would prep the lines on the dock cleat so i could from the deck of the boat. Whip the line and it would pop off the end then pull it back aboard. His Dock for the season would have the eye on the dock cleat and the excess on deck. Easing day trip leaving and returning. So it's a matter captains choice and what the mate finds safer. Last winter we did 1800 miles down the coast and back up. I would say only 1 or 2 times we didn't have someone at the dock to catch a line. For morings i have a line with double eyes , I walked the local commerical dock shrimp boats and long line boats and it was about 50/50 .And each captain had different tie off methods. So i learned in the last 50 years ? well a line is a way to secure the boat and i have seen loads of ways to do it, It seems whats best for the Captain and crew.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:50 AM   #28
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[QUOTE=honeybadger;91524]Growing up on the water here in North Carolina and being my dads deckhand and bait boy. I had tried many ways trying to aviod his advice. His boats spent the summer in NC. and then went to Fla for the winter, When in transit he had the lines eye on the deck cleat. The lines were long enough i could depending on the wind and tide toss the line over a dock cleat or piling and secure the end i still had and work to the other end. When leaving the dock i would prep the lines on the dock cleat so i could from the deck of the boat. Whip the line and it would pop off the end then pull it back aboard. His Dock for the season would have the eye on the dock cleat and the excess on deck. Easing day trip leaving and returning. So it's a matter captains choice and what the mate finds safer. Last winter we did 1800 miles down the coast and back up. I would say only 1 or 2 times we didn't have someone at the dock to catch a line. For morings i have a line with double eyes , I walked the local commerical dock shrimp boats and long line boats and it was about 50/50 .And each captain had different tie off methods. So i learned in the last 50 years ? well a line is a way to secure the boat and i have seen loads of ways to do it, It seems whats best for the Captain and crew.[/QUOTE]

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Old 06-22-2012, 10:39 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Northern Spy View Post
A low-level continuous rail (usually a 4"x 4") along the edge of a dock or float intermittently blocked up (with a chunk of 4" x 4")to provide clear passage of boat mooring lines between the bottom of the rail and the dock. Sometimes made of welded steel as well.

As exemplified in the photo on post #9 (bull rails obvious on the foreground floating dock).
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Old 06-22-2012, 11:28 AM   #30
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Thanks NS, that is what I suspected it was. Just never knew the name. I have worked on boats that have them.

Never heard of a log dog in the nautical world. Only in the logging world.
Sooooooooooooo, I give up. What is a Log Dog?
You're right, it is from the logging world. Another handy thing to have around here. It's the forged ring with a spike that you pound into a boom stick to tie up for the night. Some call them boom dogs. Some hardy souls even will tie up to a log raft.

I guess the only hard and fast rule about mooring is that there are no hard and fast rules about mooring.

I've heard of marinas that will only allow the bitter end to be tied to the dock. I guess the intent is that staff could quickly untie your boat in an emergency. I think a knife would work just as well with some of the Gordian knots I've seen on cleats.
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Old 06-22-2012, 12:34 PM   #31
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Chapman says "Dock lines frequently have an eye splice in one end but not the other. .... If you are going to be on board, it is better to retain the plain end on board. This means that you can make adjustments without getting off the boat. If there will be no one on the boat, use the end with the eye on board; use the end with the eye on board; the plain end ashore will allow adjustment without the necessity of boarding."

The general practice at my marina (which I follow) is to tie the plain end ashore. The docks are floating so adjustments, once the lines are secured, aren't usually necessary. When stepping off the boat (deck is low enough so jumping isn't necessary) to tie up (we don't rely on a shore party), it's convenient to have the lines first secured to the boat. I or a crew member adjust the lines from the dock. When leaving the berth, it is easier to recover the lines if they remain attached to the boat. Dock lines remain with the boat; have no permanent lines attached to the dock.
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