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Old 10-13-2015, 08:33 PM   #1
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Discovered along your journeys

Wifey B: There was a topic:

"Tell us about a favorite eatery you discovered along some of your journeys."

I posted, as did my hubby, some restaurants that weren't on the water. Perhaps too far from it, but then there was an assumption

"I would think it would have to be on the water to qualify"

So it led to my serious question. How far from shore, from the marina, do you explore? Do you only eat close by? While we only go by water, we explore a larger area. We wouldn't think of going to Marina Del Rey and not exploring the Getty Museum and Hollywood with movie studios and Beverly Hills. Not just cities. When we went to Washington, we had to spend time in Olympic National Park and we had to go see The Museum of Flight.

I guess an adjunct query (sounds very British doesn't it) is how long do you spend in each area? We spend from 2 to 14 days but always leave something to come back to.

And back to restaurants, when we choose to eat off the boat we ask and try to find the best places we can, whether on the water or not.

So just curious and interested in hearing from y'all. (went British to Southern...Colour me strange...ok, back to British).

Bring it on boys and girls, men and women, dudes and dudettes, dogs and cats...
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:12 PM   #2
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Most of the communities we visit by water in the San Juan and Gulf Islands are not very large. Some of them consist of only a few streets. So it's pretty easy to explore them on foot. Places like Friday Harbor, Ganges, Chemainus, Cowichan Bay, Ladysmith, Comox, Campbell River, Port McNeil, and so on are not all that large and getting about on foot is quite easy. The larger towns like Nanaimo and Campbell River are larger, but all these places grew up from their waterfronts, so that is where most of what's interesting tends to be.

Seattle we would not go to by boat (at least not our boat). But the downtown core runs right down to the waterfront and there is a small harbor right in front of the city. Many of the city's main attractions--- Pike Place Market, the Seattle Art Museum, the symphony hall, a ton of restaurants, and so on, are within a few blocks of the waterfront. So exploring Seattle on foot, by bus, or on the SLUT (South Lake Union Trolley) is quite doable although some of the hills are pretty steep if you decide to walk it.

Vancouver, BC is Canada's second largest city and is one we would take our boat to. But we have been going to Vancouver by road for 30-plus years. So we're pretty familiar with the town. If we wanted to go somewhere deeper in the city than the False Creek waterfront we'd take a cab or bus.

Victoria, the capital of BC over on Vancouver Island is another city that started as a waterfront community. So the downtown core is within a few blocks of the waterfront. And there are buses, horses and carriages, and taxis if one wants to venture farther from the water.

When we do visit one of the waterfront communities in the islands we tend to stay a couple of days if we can. But our schedules are dictated by our available vacation time. Once we have more time, we will spend more time in the places we like to go, although most of our favorite places are not towns but are either small harbors or anchorages.
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Old 10-13-2015, 11:14 PM   #3
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Most of the communities we visit by water in the San Juan and Gulf Islands are not very large. Some of them consist of only a few streets. So it's pretty easy to explore them on foot. Places like Friday Harbor, Ganges, Chemainus, Cowichan Bay, Ladysmith, Comox, Campbell River, Port McNeil, and so on are not all that large and getting about on foot is quite easy. The larger towns like Nanaimo and Campbell River are larger, but all these places grew up from their waterfronts, so that is where most of what's interesting tends to be.

Seattle we would not go to by boat (at least not our boat). But the downtown core runs right down to the waterfront and there is a small harbor right in front of the city. Many of the city's main attractions--- Pike Place Market, the Seattle Art Museum, the symphony hall, a ton of restaurants, and so on, are within a few blocks of the waterfront. So exploring Seattle on foot, by bus, or on the SLUT (South Lake Union Trolley) is quite doable although some of the hills are pretty steep if you decide to walk it.

Vancouver, BC is Canada's second largest city and is one we would take our boat to. But we have been going to Vancouver by road for 30-plus years. So we're pretty familiar with the town. If we wanted to go somewhere deeper in the city than the False Creek waterfront we'd take a cab or bus.

Victoria, the capital of BC over on Vancouver Island is another city that started as a waterfront community. So the downtown core is within a few blocks of the waterfront. And there are buses, horses and carriages, and taxis if one wants to venture farther from the water.

When we do visit one of the waterfront communities in the islands we tend to stay a couple of days if we can. But our schedules are dictated by our available vacation time. Once we have more time, we will spend more time in the places we like to go, although most of our favorite places are not towns but are either small harbors or anchorages.
Wifey B: So you walk the islands. Would you take a taxi in Vancouver or other cities? Duck Soup Inn is 5 miles from the Port of Friday Harbor. It's an incredilicious restaurant. Would you go there? Do you cover an entire island if there are things worth seeing throughout?
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Old 10-13-2015, 11:48 PM   #4
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Sure, we'd take a taxi in Vancouver. Either that or mooch a car off one of our friends up there. We are't big fans of Friday Hrbor but go there on occasion because our best boating buddies like to go there in their boat a lot. So far there are plenty of restaurants in town to kerp us occupied although we-- correction, my wife-- lijes to cook on board so we don't eat every meal out.

And we rent cars on San Juan and Orcas islands, particularly Orcas when we want to visit good friends with a horse farm there or go to East Sound.
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Old 10-14-2015, 10:14 AM   #5
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Generally when we cruise we limit ourselves to within walking distance which is maybe a couple of miles.
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Old 10-14-2015, 10:35 AM   #6
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We will take uber if it is available. We spent last weekend in East Greenwich, Rhode Island. We took the service to an awesome restaurant called The Shanty. They serve one of the best Bloody Mary's I have ever had.

The Loaded Mary:
belvedere vodka, shrimp, salami, cheddar, bacon, pepperoncini, pickled asparagus, pickled green beans, celery, lime, olive & cocktail onion

It cost about $5 each way and there were 3 of us. The rest of the weekend we were on foot.
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:03 AM   #7
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As most East coasters know, from the Chesapeake South, the topography is usually flat. That makes most communities very walkable. Folding bikes get us around for longer distances. Most of the places we stop, the village or town is near the harbor. There are some marinas that will provide loaner cars if you stay there. Regatta Point in Deltaville, Dowry Creek near Belhaven, Isle of Hope near Savannah, and Beaufort Downtown Marina in SC. to mention a few. Some marinas provide bikes to get around. Even anchored a good dinghy will most times take you to an accessible place to land. Getting around has not proven to be a real problem.
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:28 AM   #8
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Generally when we cruise we limit ourselves to within walking distance which is maybe a couple of miles.
Wife B: That truly surprises me. Thanks for sharing. I'm learning some things about how others do it.
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:33 AM   #9
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As most East coasters know, from the Chesapeake South, the topography is usually flat. That makes most communities very walkable. Folding bikes get us around for longer distances. Most of the places we stop, the village or town is near the harbor. There are some marinas that will provide loaner cars if you stay there. Regatta Point in Deltaville, Dowry Creek near Belhaven, Isle of Hope near Savannah, and Beaufort Downtown Marina in SC. to mention a few. Some marinas provide bikes to get around. Even anchored a good dinghy will most times take you to an accessible place to land. Getting around has not proven to be a real problem.
Wifey B: I know many marinas offer loaner cars. We just don't like feeling that we need to get it back for others so generally don't use them. We'll walk, take buses, and get taxis. A taxi to go five miles on land sure costs less than the last five miles on the water did. We just don't allow walking to limit us from seeing things we want to.
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:57 AM   #10
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Probably not for everyone, but when we are in the Bahamas or Caribbean we like to use the small buses when available. The van type buses have a folding seat in the center, so they are usually filled wall to wall. At about a buck a trip it's pretty cheap transportation. We really get a taste of the local culture. Near super markets just leave your shopping cart at the bus stop. In the Caymans we were staying in a Condo on 7 Mile Beach across from a little shopping center. We would roll the grocery cart right into the unit, and leave it at the bus stop.

Just listening to the chatter on the buses is an experience. We also went to Hell on a motor scooter on Grand Cayman.
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Old 10-14-2015, 01:24 PM   #11
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Probably not for everyone, but when we are in the Bahamas or Caribbean we like to use the small buses when available. The van type buses have a folding seat in the center, so they are usually filled wall to wall. At about a buck a trip it's pretty cheap transportation. We really get a taste of the local culture. Near super markets just leave your shopping cart at the bus stop. In the Caymans we were staying in a Condo on 7 Mile Beach across from a little shopping center. We would roll the grocery cart right into the unit, and leave it at the bus stop.

Just listening to the chatter on the buses is an experience. We also went to Hell on a motor scooter on Grand Cayman.
Wifey B: Well, your home port is a great example. Charleston doesn't end within walking distance. Charlestowne Museum, Middleton Place, Magnolia Plantation, and Drayton Hall are all up Ashley River Rd. Then just strolling around town.
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Old 10-14-2015, 06:47 PM   #12
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Wifey B: Well, your home port is a great example. Charleston doesn't end within walking distance. Charlestowne Museum, Middleton Place, Magnolia Plantation, and Drayton Hall are all up Ashley River Rd. Then just strolling around town.
When the boat is in Charleston, we usually have a car there. We roam for and wide to see many things. However, nothing beats an evening walk along the narrow, tree covered streets of the historic district. It's a whole different experience seeing the residents going about their daily lives. Lights in the windows and the murmurs of people in their gardens along with the soft breezes----there is nothing quite like it.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:03 PM   #13
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When the boat is in Charleston, we usually have a car there. We roam for and wide to see many things. However, nothing beats an evening walk along the narrow, tree covered streets of the historic district. It's a whole different experience seeing the residents going about their daily lives. Lights in the windows and the murmurs of people in their gardens along with the soft breezes----there is nothing quite like it.
Wifey B: We love to walk historic districts and old downtown areas of all towns and cities. They all have their special nature plus the storekeepers of the small stores that have been there for decades.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:40 PM   #14
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Moonstruck: Absolutely, on the local transportation. I am always amazed at the bus systems that many small Latin American and Caribe. Communities maintain. Note so much in the U.S. small towns along the waterways. I guess we are used to owning vehicles more so than others. I do not do the three people on one motorbike though.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:41 PM   #15
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So far, we've fueled up and kept going. We prefer to linger in the wilder places, away from people, and do lots of exploring ashore.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:52 PM   #16
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Walking. Not a lot of public transportation where we go. Ideally not even roads.
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Old 10-14-2015, 08:01 PM   #17
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Our favorite boat-accessible restaurant is in Puerto Villarta and is called Fajita Republic. Getting there requires a few-mile dinghy ride up an alligator invested river (very slow moving), and once there it is necessary to traverse a very rickety dock and to make way through some vegetation. The food is surprisingly good, and getting there (and back) is an adventure, very reminiscent of the Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disneyland and its Blue Bayou restaurant. My kids (teenagers at the time) really enjoyed it.
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Old 10-14-2015, 08:11 PM   #18
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It's quite interesting reading this thread - where we [me, my family and boat owning friends] cruise, generally it's as far away from anything 'mankind' as possible. Sure - we share these anchorages, islands and waterways with many other boaters, campers and the like - but the idea of getting in the boat to go to another marina, or explore a museum etc is, well - just not on the agenda. Certainly not a black and white thing - eg we did a 'big walk' around the town of 1770 when we anchored for a couple of days last year. And we docked at the Gladstone marina on one trip due to weather - had a great BBQ at a my uncles place and had a ball. But 99% of the time - boat trips are planned for us to get away from the 'rat race' and everything associated with it. Except the fridge and twin diesels of course
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Old 10-14-2015, 08:40 PM   #19
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In Malta, buses are definitely the way to go.

In Great Britain and western Europe, subways and trains were my favorites.

On many coastal towns, walking is our preference.
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Old 10-14-2015, 10:37 PM   #20
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Threads like this are part of why I signed up here, thanks to all of you!

MyTraveler: hope to cross paths with you someday, my winter digs are in Mulege, Baja California Sur.
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