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Old 11-22-2017, 12:15 AM   #1
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Dinghy Storage in Storm

Can you help me settle a debate? In a heavy seaway, would you feel more comfortable with your rigid inflatable and its outboard towed far astern or tied to the transom or on the swim platform? Stored deflated or upside down on the cabin top are not options.
Thank you!
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Old 11-22-2017, 12:25 AM   #2
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Can you help me settle a debate? In a heavy seaway, would you feel more comfortable with your rigid inflatable and its outboard towed far astern or tied to the transom or on the swim platform? Stored deflated or upside down on the cabin top are not options.
Thank you!
Not sure youíre in the right place to settle a debate.
You will, however, get lots of good advice . . . just not from me on this subject, since I donít have a RIB.
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Old 11-22-2017, 12:41 AM   #3
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what kind of anchor is in the RIB ?
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Old 11-22-2017, 02:09 AM   #4
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Ok - I'll start.

You've eliminated the two best options.

I'd say on the swim platform, as I lost one a couple years ago when towing far astern. They don't stand much chance in large steep waves. Some people say you just have to have the right length or painter, but the sea is never that constant and reliable. Either the painter will snap or whatever it is tied to will break or rip out.
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:15 AM   #5
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MM

Two pieces of information are needed:

--What size of dinghy and outboard?
--What brand, model and size of vessel?
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Old 11-22-2017, 06:48 AM   #6
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Ok - I'll start.

You've eliminated the two best options.

I'd say on the swim platform, as I lost one a couple years ago when towing far astern. They don't stand much chance in large steep waves. Some people say you just have to have the right length or painter, but the sea is never that constant and reliable. Either the painter will snap or whatever it is tied to will break or rip out.
I agree, even after lots of towing experience......

Storms are not predictable in any sense of the imagination so towing is usually not a great option.

But, on the swim platform isnt great either as adding the potential for damage there in storm conditions is a bad idea too.

But as Sunchaser pointed out, a bit more info would be helpful as the abovevis just generalities.
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:02 AM   #7
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Can you help me settle a debate? In a heavy seaway, would you feel more comfortable with your rigid inflatable and its outboard towed far astern or tied to the transom or on the swim platform?
Thank you!
'Stored deflated or upside down on the cabin roof and not options'

Firstly. Why on earth would you have and inflatable if you were never going to deflate it and store away?

Secondly. If you don't want to ever deflate it....and IS THIS NOT this the perfect situation to do so. (I thought the reason people had an inflatable is because its light enough to lift onto the boat to lash down)
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:46 AM   #8
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Since towed or tied seem to be our options, I'll assume that you don't have a davit system either. I also don't have a davit (buying one this winter).

I stand mine up on its side, on the swim platform and lash it to the transom. I don't have access to the swim platform while it's up. I take the motor off. I built a motor mount to hold the motor.

It's rock solid in rough seas.
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Old 11-22-2017, 09:50 AM   #9
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Here’s why we don’t tow our dinghy in anything less than perfect weather. We were leaving Victoria, heading back to Friday Harbor one winter. About 4 miles outside the harbor, the wind picked up to the point the dinghy became airborne and flipped over. We immediately turn around and headed back dragging it up side down. We lost the gas can, oars and mat. Fortunately we had taken the outboard off. Other than losing stuff, the only real damage was to my ego as we came back docks, towing an upside down dinghy with before a rather large audience on the docks in front of the Empress Hotel.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:03 AM   #10
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Hereís why we donít tow our dinghy in anything less than perfect weather. We were leaving Victoria, heading back to Friday Harbor one winter. About 4 miles outside the harbor, the wind picked up to the point the dinghy became airborne and flipped over. We immediately turn around and headed back dragging it up side down. We lost the gas can, oars and mat. Fortunately we had taken the outboard off. Other than losing stuff, the only real damage was to my ego as we came back docks, towing an upside down dinghy with before a rather large audience on the docks in front of the Empress Hotel.
The above shows what can happen if you tow a lightweight inflatable in adverse conditions.
It also shows that we need a lot more information before we can give any advice. Without, all we can do is offer anecdotes that demonstrate the problems we have encountered.

I have towed in adverse conditions. I have not towed without the outboard mounted, as a) it wasn't easy to remove, and b) its weight provided stability. I have not had any issue while towing a soft bottom inflatable, with a 15 hp outboard, approx 80#, gas can 1/2 full, 25#, short towline, so towed close to the boat. I have seen the dinghy surfing up so its bow was beside the transom of the boat. I was able to watch its behavior, though I wouldn't recommend towing, as that behavior was not very predictable. I now have a much heavier RIB, that I lift on davits for any anticipated rough water.
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Old 11-22-2017, 12:16 PM   #11
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I'm going with on-board, lashed down in davits, cradle, or flipped up on the swim platform. After seeing what happens towing in 4-5fters (porpoising) with a rib, no way am I dragging one in a storm.
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Old 11-22-2017, 12:29 PM   #12
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How could this even be a debate, wait is it with a sailboat guy?
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Old 11-22-2017, 01:03 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maineman View Post
Can you help me settle a debate? In a heavy seaway, would you feel more comfortable with your rigid inflatable and its outboard towed far astern or tied to the transom or on the swim platform? Stored deflated or upside down on the cabin top are not options.
Thank you!
Towing a dinghy in heavy weather is very difficult and the smaller the dinghy the more likely the problem.

Given only the two choices, I think lashing to transom is by far the best of two not very good options.

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Old 11-22-2017, 01:28 PM   #14
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I’d like a wireless tilt controled OB.

Use the lower unit and prop as a drouge and possibly skeg. When it gets rough lower the leg and the dink won’t get going too fast on a wave face. And w the drag all the way aft directional stability will also remain good.

FYI Seine boats usually carry their siene skiff half way up the stern of the motherboat. But there are times not to copy fishermen.

I think having the painter attached very low on the stem aids a lot of things but mostly directional stability. Draging a chain in the water aft may help too. But the drag will always be there. I may try that.
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Old 11-22-2017, 02:13 PM   #15
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Part of the question should be,"do you consider the dinghy your life raft"? If not, then upside down secured to the cabin roof would be my choice. If yes, then speed of deployment becomes an issue. Mine is right side up on the cabin, capable of float free in less than 1 minute with the aid of a sharp knife. Also have a life raft with a hydrostatic release.

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Old 11-22-2017, 03:46 PM   #16
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I always tow mine with the outboard mounted, down and locked in the center position. Tracks good that way. Has anyone ever had a dinghy flip with the outboard mounted while towing? That would really suck.
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Old 11-22-2017, 04:55 PM   #17
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I always tow mine with the outboard mounted, down and locked in the center position. Tracks good that way. Has anyone ever had a dinghy flip with the outboard mounted while towing? That would really suck.


Yes. On a 43í morgan sailboat. Small dink maybe 8í rollup with maybe a 5hp on it. Long tow from harbor into 2 to 3 ft breaking head seas. The dink filled then dragged down then inverted. Pretty much immediately. I learned to start a waterlogged outboard that day.
Iíve also towed a 10í avon with 15 hp at 20 kts calm but that scared me.
Iíve towed a 13 whaler with 40 hp behind a 42 Present at 10 kts across gulfstream. But that wasnít nice to the woodwork. Mostly destroyed it in the first 100 miles.
I dont think much of towing less than 17í boats unless very short term at sea.
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:07 PM   #18
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Swim platform by default if there is no proper mounting place. Rivieras commonly carry the dinghy on a foredeck cradle using a crane for lifting,they operate from the FB for vision(most lack a lower helm anyway). Clipper 40 have a dinghy frame cantilevered off the back of the FB and a crane.
We flipped an 8ft hard f/g dinghy inside Sydney Harbour(there was a gale warning), very difficult to flip it back due to a(?)vacuum forming, I`d hate to be doing that at sea, towing at sea is asking for a towline failure.
Light weight is one reason to have an inflatable even if you don`t deflate it. Easy to lift it on/off a beach, and to/from its onboard mount.
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:24 PM   #19
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Was with a banking customer many years ago (owner of American Boatyards, as well many others) on a 140' workboat that was turned into a 'mother ship' with many cabins. Towing a 60' Hat sportfish from Galliano, La down through the Panama Canal, up to Flamingo Bay, Costa Rico on Pacific side. Pulled beautifully - wow, size really does matter Caught many sailfish, and one huge ie 600lb, marlin. Catch and release only, oh, but many photos - member of Americn Billfish Assoc!! I'll try to scan some photos and post them, because I know - no photos, didn't happen :-)
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:43 PM   #20
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Sorry for thread drift.
Approx 90 lb Sailfish. I was much younger then Al, I'm ready for some left coast fishing???

http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/a...1&d=1511390573
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