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Old 05-19-2016, 07:04 AM   #41
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"There is not a single engine manufacturer in the world which does not specify the use of multi-viscosity oils and some of those recommend and use synthetics from the factory."

True for TODAYS engines with computer assisted assembly.

Remember cars used to go under 100,000 miles till shot , today 300,000 is common with no special effort , just PM.

What oil is "best" for a 30-40 year old engine is what ever you can sleep at night with. Most boat motors are killed , not worn out.

Our 6-71 DD uses the 40 wt CF-II oil DD still recommends for their 2 stroke engines.
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Old 05-19-2016, 07:26 AM   #42
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The only pro that should be trusted when it comes to oil is a petroleum engineer. Boat mechanics can only pass on their anecdotal experiences which are, well, relatively limited and truly unscientific.
That is true. I only mentioned the Bob Smith experience because many folks blindly follow his advice.

I did also have a discussion with a engineer at Castrol some time ago regarding multi vs straight weight when I had my old Perkins T6.354.
His basic answer when I asked about using 20-50 was that I didn't need to spend that much money for the better quality oil. The straight would be "good enough" for my old diesel.
Yes 20-50 would be better but I didn't need it.
I went with 20-50 to attempt to stop all the leaks...it worked.
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Old 05-19-2016, 08:52 AM   #43
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What oil is "best" for a 30-40 year old engine is what ever you can sleep at night with. Most boat motors are killed , not worn out.

Our 6-71 DD uses the 40 wt CF-II oil DD still recommends for their 2 stroke engines.[/QUOTE]

I'm living this right now. I have 6-71s and SW 40 is becoming increasingly harder to locate.
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Old 05-19-2016, 09:35 AM   #44
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I'm living this right now. I have 6-71s and SW 40 is becoming increasingly harder to locate.
Try a farm tractor dealership, if there's a cheaper option you'll find it there. My local guy has SW 40 by the gallon or 5 gallon bucket.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:04 AM   #45
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Agreed, but only if it truly needs changing due to its having reached its change interval. If not, leave it in and change it when it needs changing.
Depends on how you define change interval. Cummins recommends 250 hours or 6 months for its QSB5.9 marine engines. Is that overkill? Maybe. On my sailboat I tried to change the oil and filters in the spring and fall (year round boating here remember). Not sure what I'll do with the new boat. It definitely will be at least once/year.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:06 AM   #46
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jleonard wrote,
"I went with 20-50 to attempt to stop all the leaks...it worked."

I started using Castrol 20W-50 on my older car that has a rear main seal leak causing clutch slippage. The PO used Risoline (very high detergent additive) for the previous 272,000 miles. The clutch slippage is very much reduced but I assumed it was because of the high detergent additive no longer being there.

I'm guessing your cessation of leakage was probably related to viscosity. But if it's something else I'd like to know what it is. I use Castrol in most everything except my boat. I started using Castrol in my motorcycle days.

dhays,
Spring and Fall is my basic change schedule also.
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Old 05-19-2016, 12:33 PM   #47
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I'm guessing your cessation of leakage was probably related to viscosity.
Yes that was it.
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Old 05-19-2016, 01:48 PM   #48
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I agree with the Rotella and regardless of wt ( climate conditions considered ) use Lucas oil additive this will prevent dry starts.
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Old 05-19-2016, 04:17 PM   #49
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SD Pappy,
Rotella is definitely a high quality product as are other Shell products.
No such thing as a dry start though unless an engine sits for a year .. IMO.
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Old 05-19-2016, 09:35 PM   #50
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Try a farm tractor dealership, if there's a cheaper option you'll find it there. My local guy has SW 40 by the gallon or 5 gallon bucket.
Thanks ! I'll check it out
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:49 PM   #51
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There seems to be a little confusion about the W in some of the posts
The W stands for Winter, not weight.
A multigrade oil is measured at two different temperature points, one for Summer and one for Winter


They take a burette, a long glass tube with a petcock(valve) on the bottom and the valve has a certain hole size.


For winter the temperature is lower, 100 F, they open the valve and take the time it takes for a given amount of oil to flow through the valve


For summer, the temperature is higher, 212F,
Same thing, open the valve and take the time.


I have never seen a can of oil marked 30W, ie single Winter viscosity, on the can though in advertising I have seen the uninformed use this designation. So this would mean a single viscosity rated WINTER oil. 30W does not mean 30 weight


So a multigrade oil has additives that increase the viscosity through a larger range of temperatures. Which has been stated.
So if the oil has been enhanced and then measured at the 100F (Winter) burette, then it would be say 10W and also measured at the 212F (summer )burette, at say 30, then it
attracts the designation 10W30, read as 10Winter30


Newer diesel engines might spec a 15W40 oil and along with that a certain API (American Petroleum Institute) specifications. CJ-4, is one, and there are many for different applications. Then the engine manufacturer will state that their engines require a certain multi or single grade viscosity that meet their own specification.
Such as Volvo, VDS4, Volvo Drainage Specification 4, which I was at one time told that this means that the oil will adhere for a longer time before draining off the wear surface. I could not verify that this is what the drainage spec means.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:50 PM   #52
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But some diesel manufacturer's either because they were stubborn, or know something that I don't know, never changed and still recommend straight grade oils. Cat and DD are two like that I know David
David

You may want to double check this. My Cat oil charts show multi viscosity oils as commonly recommended. Not all engines mind you. My 3056s are recommended to use 15/40 wt.
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Old 05-20-2016, 09:41 AM   #53
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David

You may want to double check this. My Cat oil charts show multi viscosity oils as commonly recommended. Not all engines mind you. My 3056s are recommended to use 15/40 wt.
Cat 3116/3126 spec single grade. Apparently the high turbo boost with blowby mist cokes the oil and clogs the aftercooler. Similar situation on the Detroit two strokes, high temp at top ring cokes oil. Apparently the multivis oils break down at a lower temp.

Those are the only engines that I know of that spec single grade. Other Cats spec out 15-40.
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Old 05-20-2016, 11:18 AM   #54
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It should be stated that 15-40W is 15 weight oil w an additive that gives it the viscosity of 40 weight at 212 degrees. The base stock is 15 weight oil.

In the early days of MV engine oil the VI was only effective for a short time so after 1000 miles 10-W30 was closer to 10 weight than 30. Do present day MV oil suffer to any degree from this viscosity breakdown?
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Old 05-20-2016, 11:58 AM   #55
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It should be stated that 15-40W is 15 weight oil w an additive that gives it the viscosity of 40 weight at 212 degrees. The base stock is 15 weight oil.

In the early days of MV engine oil the VI was only effective for a short time so after 1000 miles 10-W30 was closer to 10 weight than 30. Do present day MV oil suffer to any degree from this viscosity breakdown?
In several hundred oil sample analyses, I have seen no pattern of 15w-40 oil having viscosity out of spec at 100C. Unless there was fuel dilution. Otherwise, consistently in range.
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Old 05-20-2016, 12:35 PM   #56
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Actually my oil analysis showed my 15W40 Rotella viscosity as "high" on most of my reports at both low and high temp ranges.....past spec numbers...but just barely and of no cause for concern by Blackstone.

No additives and anywhere between 100 to 200 hours on the engine.
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