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Old 04-06-2017, 09:14 PM   #1
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Dehumidifier

What can you all teach me about putting in a dehumidifier on a boat. I'm all ears. Thank You in advance.
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Old 04-06-2017, 09:49 PM   #2
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During the winter months I keep one on the boat, draining into the galley sink.
The one pictured is by Arrow Pneumatics I bought it in 2005 still running well, although the company I think, was sold or went out of business. I does a good job of keeping the humidity at the percentage set on the unit's control, there are other models available at most dept. stores.
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Old 04-06-2017, 09:59 PM   #3
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I have used small capacity dehumidifiers in my boats for decades. Typically using "small" portable units with a rating of 30-35 pints/day. I will normally have these set to run continuously with a hose that drains into the galley sink. These have worked fantastically well to keep the interior of my boats dry and fresh smelling.

Pros: Very effective and reasonably cheap. Robust units that do well even down to relatively cold temperatures. No problem with running continuously.

Cons: While they are portable, they are not terribly lightweight. I used to take it off the boat on my sailboat, which meant hauling it up the companionway ladder, across the deck, off the boat, then put it into the dock box. This got less easy over time as my knees had more difficulty. They aren't quiet. We would never use them while on the boat due to the noise.

Just last month, I switched from this unit to several of the Peltier type of dehumidifiers. I purchased 2 of the Eva Dry 2200 and 1 of the Eva Dry 1100. I use all three on the boat and so far they have worked well. While the outside humidity have been upwards of 98%, the interior humidity has been hovering between 50-57%.

Pros: These are very quiet units. There is no problem having them running full time while we are sleeping or chatting in the saloon. They don't use a lot of power. The large units are only 14" tall and only weigh a bit over 6 lbs. Very easy to pick up, move, store, etc... I have one in the saloon/galley, another in the forward cabin, and the small one up in the pilot house.

One of the biggest reasons I wanted to move to these was that we wanted to be able to use them on the boat when are are out on the boat. These are small enough, quiet enough, and efficient enough to do that.

Cons: These three units (2 large and 1 small) likely remove less water than one of the traditional dehumidifiers. OTOH, I have them spread around the boat which means I don't need fans to circulate the air.

They don't come with a hose adaptor. That means that once the bucket is full, it will turn off. I did modify one of them by drilling a 1/4" hole near the bottom of the plastic bucket and stuck a short length of vinyl 1/8 diameter hose in the hole. (1/8" ID hose has an OD of 1/4"). I put the end of the hose in the galley sink and it drains just fine. I have yet to do that to the other two. I tested it and all I have to do is drape the hose over the top of the dehumidifier and then the hose won't drain or drip and the unit can be moved anywhere.

If the temperature approaches 40F the fins of the unit can ice up. This will keep the unit from functioning. I haven't had a problem with this so far. I have an oil pan heater on the engine, which keeps the boat from getting too cold. I am sure that next winter I will have more of an issue but one of the options I am considering is simple using a mechanical plug-in timer to have it run during the day and stay off at night. The boat warms up a lot during the day.

Bottom line: Use a dehumidifier. Regardless of what type you use, you will never regret not having a damp or clammy boat. If you have plenty of on board storage, consider getting a small traditional dehumidifier. They are incredibly effective. If you want to use a dehumidifier while out cruising, consider the Peltier type units. They are quiet and seem to work really well.
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Old 04-06-2017, 10:00 PM   #4
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I use a portable GE unit bought from Lowes home store. Either the smallest or second smallest. Works great. In spring and fall no HVAC needed, but humidity builds and boat turns into a SWAMP. No more, problem solved.
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Old 04-06-2017, 10:10 PM   #5
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We use a household dehumidifier often. We live aboard and when the weather gets chilly, the dehumidifier pulls a lot of water and warms the area some. Our unit has wheels on the bottom and we move it around the boat.
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Old 04-06-2017, 11:17 PM   #6
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I also use a household unit that I bought from Lowe's. I put it in my engine room and it has a hose connection that drains into the bilge. I leave a hatch to the aft cabin and another hatch to the forward cabin from my engine room open to get as much air circulation as possible throughout the boat.

It has made a huge difference. I use to get condensation on my engines, wiring, hoses, mirrors, walls, just everywhere. The dehumidifier cleared it up in a day. Turned the dehumidifier off for a day and the condensation was back. I'm now a believer.

I tried one of the small West Marine metal units with the holes in the top, just a heater and a fan I think, but it had no affect. Those units worked well on the West Coast in Southern California, but not here on the East Coast of North Carolina.
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Old 04-07-2017, 12:17 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post



I tried one of the small West Marine metal units with the holes in the top, just a heater and a fan I think, but it had no affect. Those units worked well on the West Coast in Southern California, but not here on the East Coast of North Carolina.


I have a couple of those WM units. They do have a very low speed fan with just a very low power heating element. They have the advantage of being a low energy draw, move the air around, and provide a bit of heat. They are a great complement to a dehumidifier. They help keep the air circulating which makes the dehumidifier more effective.

I keep one of those in my aft lazarette as well as another one in the head which is between the forward cabin and the saloon where I have some dehumidifiers.
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Old 04-07-2017, 08:23 AM   #8
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We kept 3 units, household type, on our 44 trawler, when we were away. All drained into sinks, which drained directly overboard. We also turned cushions on their side as well. We found that in our experience that it was not wise to turn them up too far,. It would actually shrink the wood, if turned up too far.
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Old 04-07-2017, 09:00 AM   #9
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I use two small piezo-electric units. They work well, are whisper quiet, and consume little energy.
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Old 04-07-2017, 09:50 AM   #10
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I use one of these and it has done a great job of preventing mildew.
https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/sto...FQVDhgodpkMKwA
I modified it by drilling a hole in the tank, inserting some aquarium air hose and letting it drain into the sink.
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Old 04-07-2017, 11:05 AM   #11
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That is the same unit I use in the PH. It does work well.
This is the amount of water it pulled in this last week.
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This is the larger 2200 in the galley. Notice the vinyl hose.
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This is the one on a shelf in the forward cabin.
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This morning the outside humidity is 99% and the inside humidity is 56%
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Old 04-07-2017, 11:31 AM   #12
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Dave, great minds think alike.
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Old 04-07-2017, 02:10 PM   #13
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At Parks' recommendation a year or so ago, I bought the Eva 2200 and modified it with Parks' idea of a hose exactly like Dave did. It drains into my galley sink or, if I need more battery water, into a dedicated distilled water jug for the batteries.

My single unit works very well in the moderate climes of Northern California's Delta and SF Bay areas. I could see how in more humid climates, more than one could be needed.

I use one of those West Marine UFO-looking heaters in the head to keep the chill off. It's low heat, fan and low power are a good fit in the head.
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Old 04-07-2017, 03:27 PM   #14
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Thank You All for your fantastic information. I appreciate the time you all have given in writing the responses.
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Old 04-07-2017, 03:43 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
At Parks' recommendation a year or so ago, I bought the Eva 2200 and modified it with Parks' idea of a hose exactly like Dave did. It drains into my galley sink or, if I need more battery water, into a dedicated distilled water jug for the batteries.

With my compressor type of dehumidifiers on the sailboats, I would always put the drain hose in a water bottle and put that in the galley sink. The bottle would always be full when I got to the boat and I would top off my wet cells with it.
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Old 04-07-2017, 06:49 PM   #16
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We live aboard. We found that a Danby 30 pint unit is perfect for our boat. It is located in the aft head which is just off the salon. It circulates the air well and the main heating system distributes the dryer air through out the boat. When the temperature falls below 50 degrees condensation becomes an issue and we run ours 24/7. It has a drain hose and drains into the shower sump.
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Old 04-07-2017, 07:22 PM   #17
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I recommend getting a hygrometer to keep track of how well your dehumidifying efforts are going. You're shooting for 60% my gets down to about 63% and I don't have mildew problems.

Weems and Plath makes some nice combo hygrometer / thermometers.
Endurance II 115 Comfortmeter
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Old 04-07-2017, 07:45 PM   #18
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I'll add that I too use a dehumidifier. Two of the small Eva dry. Both have been modified with a tube to drain into the sink. Makes a big difference.
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Old 04-07-2017, 07:52 PM   #19
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As recommended in an previous thread we added an EcoSeb dehumidifier after finding some minor mildew & dampness in HEY JUDE during the winter. When we're away it operates in the galley sink & drains overboard. We've been very pleased with it's performance.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 04-07-2017, 10:11 PM   #20
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Quote:
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I recommend getting a hygrometer to keep track of how well your dehumidifying efforts are going. You're shooting for 60% my gets down to about 63% and I don't have mildew problems.
A weather station or many indoor/outdoor digital thermometers report relative humidity also.
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