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Old 08-11-2014, 08:35 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post

I'm a simple man. Value in a boat works as follows:

1. You love the boat, and think it fills your needs.
2. You like it better than your money.

I don't finance toys which is what boats are. They are a depreciating asset with a ridiculous carrying cost. Simply, I had to like it better than my hard earned money. When the money comes out of your investments as opposed to a loan, only then will you have decided what the true value of a particular boat is.

Ted
As opposed to Ted above, being a simple man, I've been accused of being a complicated man. In spite of this, I see it the way he does.
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Old 08-11-2014, 08:43 PM   #22
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For me/us the value was more related to the realization that the next 10 years of grand kids, and being young enough to afford the boat outweighed the worries about the outlay. We shopped for 2.5 years narrowing down the type, then the length, then the brand. Considering the 'brand name' (Grand Banks) and the alternatives made us realize the brand name wasn't worth the extra $$. So we opted for a different brand with a loyal following. Of course, knowing I may have to do an engine rebuild, or repower or a awl grip topside job may be looming effects the price. But I realize that for the next 10 years or so my Grandkids WANT to be with Papa and Nana. This is the time. Now is the moment and the money is secondary. I would hate to hear even 5 years from now: the kids are 'too busy' to want to go with Nana and Papa on the boat. Of course we go other places and do other things.

The ramble is: Sometimes it's not about 'just' the price. It's about what's happening in the rest of your life.
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Old 08-11-2014, 10:05 PM   #23
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I've purchased 5 boats (spent years time on many others when young). Two I still own. Made double up on one after owning for one year. Nearly triple up on one after owning for two years. Push on another after owing for many years.

Currently own two. LUV em both! Don't plan to sell. Plan to play with em for many years. Both in Excellent shape when I purchased. Both built Excellently to begin with.

Toys, Toys, Toys. Always fun to have toys! Pleasure boats: Best Toy in the world - IMHO

Happy Boating Daze! - Art

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Old 08-11-2014, 10:27 PM   #24
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...
The ramble is: Sometimes it's not about 'just' the price. It's about what's happening in the rest of your life.
We know what boat we want. Life may make a slight change in the choice or prevent us from getting the boat at all, but we can't control those issues...

Right now, it makes NO money sense to have a boat, and if we had a boat, it would negatively impact the boat we want that will allow us to travel as we wish. We have other responsibilities at the moment, so having a boat is out of the question. Chartering is a better choice.

I have seen used boats from the builder we are interested in selling for asking price which was pretty danged close to new list price! We figure once we get the boat it will depreciate in value in spite of the above example. However, looking at what we want to do with the boat and what it will cost, while comparing that cost with trying to do the same thing without a boat, the boat is cheaper.

If The Plan works, we can have our boat to travel as we wish for the remaining good years we will have at that point in our life. Almost certainly, we will have to go back to land as health issues take over, but we will have done, or attempted to accomplish, our dream travel. To fail to try will cause deep regret. If we achieve, the most likely expense will be well worth the cost, and the value will be priceless.

Later,
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Old 08-11-2014, 11:02 PM   #25
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And, as we get older 'regret' is a word I rue and try to avoid at all costs! Good luck on your search.
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Old 08-12-2014, 05:56 AM   #26
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Interesting thread. The OP's original post looked at the financials of a boat' salute, and as many have said there is no financial upside for most of us on boat ownership. In our case, we bought our current boat in a buyer's market from a motivated seller. We should be able to sell it for at least what we paid for it. Moorage is our biggest financial cost, at about $800 per month. Insurance is about $200 per month. Maintenance costs average out at about $300 per month. We could moor the boat for half the current cost or less, but it would be an hour or more away instead of five minutes away, and we would use it a lot less. We use our boat a lot and average about $200 per month on fuel costs.

What do we get out of it? We have made more good friends boating in the last four years than at any other time in our lives. We have had more fun times boating than doing anything else in our lives. We have a beautiful house with a great view but many nights we stay on the boat, at the dock, because we prefer to be on the water.

On a side note we have found that the best bang for the buck upgrade to our boat has been joining a yacht club. The club cruises have taken us to lots of neat destinations with friends to explore with. Casual weekend trips, last-minute get-togethers. If you haven't joined a yacht club you owe it to yourselves to check a few out. Every club I know will host you to a free meal so you can meet their members. You will know when you have found the right club.

To steal from the credit card company's ad campaign, owning a boat: initial investment, 200k; carrying costs, 18k per year; memories, priceless. Absolutely priceless.
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Old 08-12-2014, 10:48 AM   #27
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While we obviously own "a" boat (let's not be silly), it's not our dream boat. But given our work commitments, our location far from convenient access to good cruising, and our lack of experience, we are finding we find much more value in chartering other people's dream boats. Hopefully later our circumstances will allow us to "live the dream", but in the meantime we still get to visit it. To me that's far better than waiting until someday.
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:03 AM   #28
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To me that's far better than waiting until someday.

Absolutely! You ask a tough question. The 'value' of any of our fine vessels varies with our personal situation, amount of use, (obviously) amount of free cash and most importantly our family. It's not just about the cash outlay.

There's lots if things I would 'love' to acquire. But in all reality, a Porsche, a beachfront condo in Destin, or an AK-47 are neither Grandkid friendly, not are they easy to enjoy with the Grandkids. So my price, use and value is perhaps skewed from someone else's.

If it fits YOUR life, then it's a whole lot more 'affordable' to you.
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:08 AM   #29
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Absolutely! You ask a tough question. The 'value' of any of our fine vessels varies with our personal situation, amount of use, (obviously) amount of free cash and most importantly our family. It's not just about the cash outlay.

There's lots if things I would 'love' to acquire. But in all reality, a Porsche, a beachfront condo in Destin, or an AK-47 are neither Grandkid friendly, not are they easy to enjoy with the Grandkids. So my price, use and value is perhaps skewed from someone else's.

If it fits YOUR life, then it's a whole lot more 'affordable' to you.
Well said - - > cappy!!
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Old 08-13-2014, 12:56 PM   #30
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Gotta love this site. So much wisdom. Many, many interesting perspectives (as usual).

The concept of value will always be an individual definition IMO. Although that's not to say we may agree to a specific definition when framed within a certain context. I.e, is the value being expressed from a financial perspective, from a happiness perspective, from a need versus a want, etc.?

Believing that most of us are using discretionary income for the purposes of sustaining our interests in boating, "value" to me as posted by the OP ends up feeling more like being able to justify our participation in this activity.

Since my boat isn't my livelihood nor my primary residence, it's all about the pleasure derived from participating. Be it being a simple or complex man (or woman), we are only here for so many days. Since none of us know when the last day will be upon us, I don't measure my "pleasures" with a significant concern for a return on investment. I do it because it falls with my allocated percentage of discretionary spending, I enjoy it, and I believe as some one else posted, I would like to have as few regrets as possible on "my last day."

I guess it all comes down to whether we're using the word value as a verb or a noun. If I were to start evaluating my pleasures by attempting to assess value from a purely financial decision, it would either lead to analysis paralysis or missing the enjoyment. One person's rationality is another's delusion. There is nothing "rationale" about pleasure boating. We do it because we couldn't imagine life without it. Thus, the "value" to my sanity to immeasurable.
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