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Old 04-16-2014, 11:32 AM   #21
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I cannot comment on the hull transom or stringers as I do not know that model. I will say for most decks, what you might have missed is the structural nature of the design. Essentailly the one inch thick decks are very wide, very flattened "I" beams which depend for their strength on the rigid vertical attachment between the upper glass and the lower. In my case that one inch "I" beam supports the weight of several passengers on the bridge across a 10 foot free span over the sedan. It is pretty neat engineering but you have to replicate with strong adhesion above and below the filler it when you rebuild it.

If you are searching for where the water went, I will assume for a second that the filler is vertical balsa (and you should check this) look for brown tracking stain signs anywhere in or out below the deck particularly after a good rain.

I will also assume for a second that the deck folds over the hull (again check) so the cancer probably stops there even if the hull happens to be cored.

If you did not see the tracking stains, my view is that the damage may be limited.

Make an offer and Good Luck
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:45 AM   #22
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On the issue of collateral damage(confining my answer to the deck and hull) most surveyors use a small hammer to tap the surface and listen for a sharp hit (good) versus a dull one (bad) This is a learned skill and the average owner probably should not depend on his own interpretation.
They also use a moisture meter - got mine for $25 at a Canadian store like Harbor Freight - interpretation still requires some skill (and maybe a better quality uinit than mine) but easier to use yourself. Both the meter and the tapping will generally show the extent of the problem.
All moisture is not disaster. You can put up with a bit of moisture in some spots - maybe around trim or things that are screwed into the deck but you cannot live with major intrusion into the transom or stringer rot.
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Old 04-16-2014, 01:20 PM   #23
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I have had good luck over the years repairing balsa cored foredecks and cabin overheads on my Bruno-Stillman (not the Willard) and friends' boats by using this, non distructive method if the area can be reached from inside.
Sound and mark out the area, drill 3/16 holes every 3" throughout the entire area through the inner skin AND balsa. Tent it with a dehumidifier till no more water shows in the collection bucket. Inject the holes, one at a time, with glass micro-balloon thickened epoxy moving from one hole to another and plugging the holes with sheet metal screws. Injection by syringe, empty caulking cartrige, or grease gun depending on situation. Cure, remove screws, patch holes.

This makes a very solid permenent repair without a lot of distructive glasswork and grinding.

PS: Extreme care must be used when using a grease gun because of the pressure available.
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Old 04-16-2014, 01:58 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougcole View Post
OK, I owned a 1073 36' Gulfstar for 8 years, which now lives with John Nall (a regular on the forum). It had/has a few soft deck spots when I bought it. A PO did extensive deck repairs and covered it with treadmaster, which is a good solution.

I had a spot in the side deck where the was a crack that oozed water. It bugged me so I cut out a section of the top skin that was the full width of the side deck and about 4 feet long. I dug out the wet balsa core.

The thing I found is that the layup, at least on my old boat, of the bottom skin is so thick, about 1 1/2", that the deck is essentially solid glass. In my opinion, the core really didn't serve much purpose.

I laid plywood back in the now gaping repair with epoxy, reglassed the top skin on and replaced the deck covering.

Honestly, I wouldn't do it again if there are no leaks or anything. I stood on the bottom skin alone and jumped up and down. No flexing.

Also, Gulfstars have solid glass hulls and solid glass cabin sides. No worries about rot there, unless the water is actually getting inside the cabin and rotting the interior cabin walls.
Doug,

THANKS! Great info! BTW, the other boat we're considering is a 1974 Gulfstar 36', probably very, very similar to the one you used to own. If only it were just a little bigger - 38' or 39' - it would be our first choice, I think.
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Old 04-16-2014, 03:24 PM   #25
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John will likely chime in here as well, he has had the boat about a year and I don't think he is having any rot problems, but I could be wrong. It is also quite likely the thickness of the skins varies between boats and even different areas of the deck. My .02 is that you should negotiate your best price, using this rot a s leverage. If there isn't any bad flexing and associated cracking just keep an eye on things. It's not going to sink the boat.
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Old 04-16-2014, 03:49 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Dougcole View Post
John will likely chime in here as well, he has had the boat about a year and I don't think he is having any rot problems, but I could be wrong. It is also quite likely the thickness of the skins varies between boats and even different areas of the deck. My .02 is that you should negotiate your best price, using this rot a s leverage. If there isn't any bad flexing and associated cracking just keep an eye on things. It's not going to sink the boat.


Good advice. I think that's exactly what we'll do.

Thanks, everyone, for all your input!
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Old 04-17-2014, 11:27 AM   #27
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Caviat

The one area that can be a problem that needs attention is core separation in the deck near the bow. Often hose pipes or leaking deck fittings allow water intrusion. If a boat is going to be used in conditions that could stuff the bow into head seas the deck could taco and take on large quantities of water. I have heard of this happening to a 75' Hatteras on a delivery to Seattle. The boat was saved with pumps and repaired. On the same theme I almost bought a Hatteras 48LRC that during survey the deck was discovered soft from the bow pulpit to the pilot house. The surveyor noted that on a previous survey done 22 years earlier he had noted the same problem. In fact he pointed out that had written on the bottom of the deck in the chain locker with felt pen at that time. I passed on the boat. It was bought by a fellow from Anacortes that with the knowledge of the deck condition took the boat home from the Bay Area in January or February. I asked him how it went and he said they had stuffed the bow several times and had shook the chain out of the anchor locker into the forward stateroom. Other than the mess that caused no other problems.
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