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Old 02-06-2019, 08:27 AM   #21
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MN
You raise a solid question. Why come to TF to get general advice on a $4M boat?
It's not $4M, it's $4,000,000.00

When you spend $4M on a boat, every penny counts.
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:33 PM   #22
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Thank you for your advice. I will try and "take it down a notch."
I got a little upset at having my motives, veracity and competence questioned by people who are basing their opinion of me on a few random sentences.
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Old 02-06-2019, 03:10 PM   #23
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Thank you for your advice. I will try and "take it down a notch."
I got a little upset at having my motives, veracity and competence questioned by people who are basing their opinion of me on a few random sentences.
Solely based on my experience of many many years on many many boating forums.

When a brand new poster signs up and his first or second post is to flame one business and praise another, AND names those businesses, generally that poster never posted after that - he joined solely to vent against a business - or for a business.

I would always suggest that a new poster be around for awhile, get involved in the conversations, everyone gets to know who you are, then you can pass judgement. Though frankly I would be careful bashing any business on line by name myself.
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Old 02-06-2019, 07:10 PM   #24
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More important questions to me, are: 1) are you planning to run this boat with just you and your wife? 2) If so what experience do the two of you have operating boats as a team? 3) Have you evaluated the ergonomics of these boats for such a purchase? As I have seen first hand, having run or been crew on large ships is almost irrelevant when it comes to a couple running a recreational boat on their own. Now if you are hiring crew, well then, have at it.

As for the boats in question, Yachtforum may be a better venue for opinions.
In that class of brand new boat, I'd be considering Offshore (in particular), Marlow, Ocean Alexander as well.
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Old 02-06-2019, 07:37 PM   #25
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I'm not going to tell you what to buy, but I will say that I could never recommend a Prestige. I have a good friend who has run quite a few new and nearly new ones and the owners have encountered too many issues to suit me and difficulty in getting them fixed right the first time (or second or third). Prestige is a Jeanneau brand.

You're also looking at very different type boats on the Hampton vs. the Prestige. Hampton more for longer range cruising and the Prestige more for shorter coastal cruising.
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Old 02-06-2019, 07:58 PM   #26
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Things can be taken out of context fairly quick on boat forums. We are all guilty of it, myself included. Good luck with your search.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:05 PM   #27
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If Prestige is a Jenneau brand, and Jeanneau is owned by Beneteau, it is possible Prestige have a balsa cored hull above and below the waterline.
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:34 PM   #28
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My wife and I spent 2 years looking at boats. We looked at a boat that would be seaworthy and provide all of the “comforts of home” since we would be living aboard fulltime and circumnavigating the Caribbean over a three year period.

We admired the Fleming 65 and the Outer Reef 65 before buying oou 64 Grand Banks Aleutian. We were just onboard a Hampton Endurance and it appeared to be a nice well equipped and well built boat.

We have found the 64/65 is the largest boat both my wife nand I can easily handle. Dockage for bigger boats both in length and beam becomes both problematic and expensive. It’s 20 foot beam provides a great deal of room. It’s amazing how the beam can affect the liveability. The 5.5 draft is about the maximum for many shallow locations like the ICW and the Bahamas. We do pay attention to the tides in a number of locations to ensure we have adequate depth of transit in some areas.

The 2200 gallons of diesel provides an adequate 1500 mile range at 8 knots, although the boat with its twin 800 hp CATS will top out about 18 kts but fuel consumption is horrendous at these sppeds and range less than 500 nm.

We have a full beam master with three ensuites. Also a full kictchen with all of the conveniences (dishwashr, induction stove top, trash compactor, full sizeside be sideer refrigerator, etc.). The crew quarters and wet head have been converted to workshop with lots of storage for water gear (i.e., scuba gear, compressor, and water toys) as well as spare parts.

Fresh water capacity is unusually large at 650 gallons. Gray water and black water tanks are liberal as well at 150 gallons each. We have a 60 gallon per hour water maker that provides more than ample fresh water for anchor and boat washdowns as well as normal laundry with a built in washer and separate dryer.

The 20KW generator supports, along wth the port engine 140 amp alternator 800 amp-hr batteries at 24v. When fully charged these AGM batteries will carry us about 14-16 hours to a 50% discharge using 300 amp-hours.

While I could go on discussing navigation, communications, stabilization, etc. The point is that there are a tremndous number of factors to consider in finding the boat that most aligns with your boating plans. The better you can define where and how you want to use your boat the better the chances of finding a boat you will not regret in the future.

I wish you good luck in your endeavors.
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:18 PM   #29
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Can't provide technical advise as I am still learning myself. Can comment on Hampton 658 as i recently purchased one and am very happy with how the broker and factory handled everything. We made many and major changes to the boat to suit both my wife's and my desires/needs. Many changes after contract was signed without requests for additional money/change orders. I know many are saying that I must have overpaid, but I have purchased several new boats and any changes after contract resulted in a change order. A fellow TF has a blog regarding his 658. go to M/V Mahalo - Blog. We looked at many long range cruisers/trawlers and had a list of about 25 must have items from layout to furniture to mechanical systems and the 658 fit our bill. We looked at fleming, off shore, outer reef, grand banks, nordhavn which were all good boats but each had a disqualifying item when looking at our selection criteria. Just an FYI, most builders listed are looking at 18-24 months for a new build so put that in your planning. Good luck and a great problem to have.
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:39 PM   #30
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We admired the Fleming 65 and the Outer Reef 65 before buying oou 64 Grand Banks Aleutian. We were just onboard a Hampton Endurance and it appeared to be a nice well equipped and well built boat.

.
I hate that they stopped building that boat. At one time we were strongly considering one.
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Old 02-14-2019, 06:44 PM   #31
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Without knowing much about them I have to say the Endurance line look as much like proper LRCs as a Fleming which will also go pretty fast. The Prestige on the other hand looks like a high speed Euro Yacht. Not a fan.
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:16 PM   #32
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Another + for a Fleming.
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:05 PM   #33
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The Prestige is not a long range cruiser. It doesn't sound like you are looking for a long range cruiser but more of a boat for entertaining which, is totally fine if that's what you want it for. If you want to do both you can't go wrong with a Flemming. Why did you sell the big Hampton? I thought the big Hamptons are pretty capable boats aren't they? If you want to go blue water cruising then you need a full displacement boat like a Nordhavn or Kadey Krogen, Selene or maybe even an Outer Reef.

I'm still learning and with what I've learned so far, if I was to start over, I'd get a Nordhavn 46. With the money that I saved I'd deck it out with new electronics, solor panels, more refrigeration, freezers a huge genset, water maker, separate washer and drier, etc.. I'd put a hydraulic lift off the transom to keep my tender close to the water so I don't have to go through the hassle of using a crane. I'd stay away from new and pretty. That's what I've learned from my newbe experience from cruising in the PNW.

Good Luck!
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:23 AM   #34
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The Prestige is not a long range cruiser. It doesn't sound like you are looking for a long range cruiser but more of a boat for entertaining which, is totally fine if that's what you want it for. If you want to do both you can't go wrong with a Flemming. Why did you sell the big Hampton? I thought the big Hamptons are pretty capable boats aren't they? If you want to go blue water cruising then you need a full displacement boat like a Nordhavn or Kadey Krogen, Selene or maybe even an Outer Reef.

I'm still learning and with what I've learned so far, if I was to start over, I'd get a Nordhavn 46. With the money that I saved I'd deck it out with new electronics, solor panels, more refrigeration, freezers a huge genset, water maker, separate washer and drier, etc.. I'd put a hydraulic lift off the transom to keep my tender close to the water so I don't have to go through the hassle of using a crane. I'd stay away from new and pretty. That's what I've learned from my newbe experience from cruising in the PNW.

Good Luck!
One comment from someone who has a boat with a hydraulic platform - it's not the best solution in heavy seas. Depending on how low the transom sits when underway it can even be a liability. We are in the final stages of purchasing a Beneteau Swift Trawler after owning a Sundance for the past 3 years. We've had multiple issues when we were taking waves on the beam which loosened the straps holding the dinghy which then created a dangerous situation when the dinghy started filling with water (even with the drain plug removed).

For coastal cruising, I think it's much better to have your dinghy away from the transom.

This will be our first boat with a crane so it will be interesting to see how we like it!
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Old 02-21-2019, 01:48 AM   #35
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One comment from someone who has a boat with a hydraulic platform - it's not the best solution in heavy seas. Depending on how low the transom sits when underway it can even be a liability. We are in the final stages of purchasing a Beneteau Swift Trawler after owning a Sundance for the past 3 years. We've had multiple issues when we were taking waves on the beam which loosened the straps holding the dinghy which then created a dangerous situation when the dinghy started filling with water (even with the drain plug removed).

For coastal cruising, I think it's much better to have your dinghy away from the transom.

This will be our first boat with a crane so it will be interesting to see how we like it!
The only boat we've had with a hydraulic platform, it was a very large platform and it sat very high and out of the water. It worked well and we didn't encounter straps loosening although we kept a check on them. Also, due to the speed of the boat, taking waves on the beam wasn't often an issue.

That said, if the boat has space, I prefer a crane. For those who talk about the work in using one, I'd suggest spending time to refine the techniques and adjusting things to make it easier. To us, it's smooth.

Now, our preferred of all solutions is a garage. However that's not practical on most boats and on others you have to choose often garage vs. lazerette vs crew cabin.
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:14 PM   #36
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One comment from someone who has a boat with a hydraulic platform - it's not the best solution in heavy seas. Depending on how low the transom sits when underway it can even be a liability. We are in the final stages of purchasing a Beneteau Swift Trawler after owning a Sundance for the past 3 years. We've had multiple issues when we were taking waves on the beam which loosened the straps holding the dinghy which then created a dangerous situation when the dinghy started filling with water (even with the drain plug removed).

For coastal cruising, I think it's much better to have your dinghy away from the transom.

This will be our first boat with a crane so it will be interesting to see how we like it!
Congratulations on your new Swift Trawler. I'm sure you will get much more enjoyment out of it.

I wasn't referring to a hydraulic swim step. I'd like to get the Sealift. It mounts to the hull and lifts a tender way above the swimstep. It might still be an issue in heavy seas - I don't know. But it gets old using a crane. At least it does for me at age 62.
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:18 PM   #37
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Iíd be looking at the Lazzara line at that price point.
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Old 02-21-2019, 05:45 PM   #38
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If you look at a tender lift system off the stern, some of the systems don't keep the hydraulic cylinders out of the water, or even keeping them retracted for the majority of the time. Hydraulic cylinders are chromed and subject to corrosion. If you keep it retracted, the majority of the chrome piston rod is protected from rust and corrosion.
Once they rust or corrode, the seals are the first things to go, and that lets hydraulic oil out and water into the system. That can destroy the valves and pumps...
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:53 PM   #39
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If you look at a tender lift system off the stern, some of the systems don't keep the hydraulic cylinders out of the water, or even keeping them retracted for the majority of the time. Hydraulic cylinders are chromed and subject to corrosion. If you keep it retracted, the majority of the chrome piston rod is protected from rust and corrosion.
Once they rust or corrode, the seals are the first things to go, and that lets hydraulic oil out and water into the system. That can destroy the valves and pumps...
Good to know. That's why I love this forum. Cruisers know their stuff!
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