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Old 08-05-2016, 03:52 AM   #1
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Cruise Ship Lifeboat Question

I was walking the decks of a cruise ship and noticed what appear to be hand rails below the waterline of their lifeboats. Is this a toe rail to help climb in, or is it there in the event that it turns turtle?

Some of them even had zincs as well, which is odd since they didn't appear to be grounded (exterior at least) perhaps there is an inside ground line. Seems to me that if it was insulated by the hull and all aluminum, no zinc should be needed.
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Old 08-05-2016, 06:34 AM   #2
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Yes to the railings. If it turns turtle that allows handholds and/or locations to secure yourself can also be used for all the items you noted. Without a pic. of the actual boat and knowing the building materials it is hard to say anything about the zincs. Are you sure it was an aluminum hull ? What is the aluminum hull insulating ?
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Old 08-05-2016, 11:01 AM   #3
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Ok, here is an image of the underneath of the lifeboats.

They have fiberglass hulls, not aluminum.

Also they had a mix of mono-hull and catamaran hulled lifeboats.

THe last photo shows a catamaran and if you look closely, you'll see what appears to be a shaft zinc secured to the 'hand rail' like thing...

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Old 08-05-2016, 01:15 PM   #4
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The catamaran types are also used as tenders, where the ship can't dock, so the need for zincs as these are used much more frequently than the true lifeboats.
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Old 08-05-2016, 01:16 PM   #5
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Or maybe its the other way around, ie maybe mono-hulls are used for tenders??
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Old 08-05-2016, 06:50 PM   #6
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Or maybe they are both "true lifeboats" and are both used as tenders as necessary. The zincs are most likely used to protect the typically below surface metal railings as that is what they appear to be attached to.
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Old 08-05-2016, 07:26 PM   #7
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Those dual prop lifeboats are a lot nicer than the ones we had when I was on ships years ago. One of my classmates was on a tug in the Pacific and it sank. It was many years ago, But I believe he spent well over a week in the life boat with two other crew mates. They were eventually rescued.
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Old 08-05-2016, 07:47 PM   #8
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On dozens of on trips with various cruise lines, I have only seen the twin-engine, catamaran-hull boats used as tenders. They are better equipped for that purpose compared to the single-engine, single-hull lifeboats.
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Old 08-05-2016, 07:59 PM   #9
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On the cruises that I have been on the tenders were not life boats and were not stored, maintained, or serviced on board but rather pre-positioned at whatever location the Linear was scheduled to stop at. Thus no chance of an accident or misadventure having to take one out of service and then having to leave crew or passengers behind because they did not have a functioning life boat/ tender.
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Old 08-06-2016, 01:13 AM   #10
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The single engine / single screw life boats also have a Kort nozzle instead of a rudder. The engine was cooled by a keel cooler just to port of the keel.

There looked like there were several separate tenders on a different launch rig from the lifeboats. Also, there were dozens of canister solas inflatable lifeboats forward of the powered lifeboats.

I'm glad we didn't need them

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Old 08-06-2016, 01:57 AM   #11
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There is usually also a rib type boat with a powerful outboard engine, able to be launched very quickly. Presumably to act as a fast rescue vessel, and for other urgent requirements. I`ve seen one in use, but it was just getting an exercise run to photograph the ship in a Pacific port not previously visited.
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Old 08-06-2016, 06:38 PM   #12
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Stu: The item that you are referring to as a kort nozzle "instead of a rudder" is actually what is called a "Z Drive". It incorporates the basic dynamics of a kort nozzle coupled with rotational features and is completely ( 360 degrree ) rotational. Some of the newer American Commercial Lines towboats are being built with these. I have also seen them as very functional on harbor tugs. I spoke with some of my former Capts. at ACL and many of them are being "retrained" for these drives. It is hard for me to imagine not having flanking rudders or for that matter main rudders.
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Old 08-07-2016, 12:19 AM   #13
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These lifeboats simply had a Kort nozzle aft of the prop to direct the thrust and steer the boat. No z-drive here. I will see if I can dig up a photo once we get back home tonight. I think one of the Kort nozzle boats is forward of the cat boats in one of the images I posted.
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Old 08-08-2016, 09:06 PM   #14
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@Stubones99 You are correct about the 'kort nozzle' devices abaft the wheel. Several years ago SOLAS mandated that the props have guards around them so they couldn't strike the errant swimmer in an emergency. This was found to be more effective than a rudder, without the need to train the operators in tiller use. Easier to use a steering wheel. They aren't really kort nozzles, as they don't increase the thrust, but they are steerable nozzles which have the desired effect of prop protection.

If you notice the pics of the twin screw tenders they have a couple stainless bars suspended outboard of the wheels as protection also.

Now would someone please tell me where the 'Frapping lines' and 'Tricing pendants' are?

The cruise ship LBs are enclosed, but NOT self righting. The doors, hatches and closures are simply 'water shedding' NOT water tight. These lifeboats are of around 100 to 150 person capacity. They are too wide to self right. besides, I don't think the regulations call for self righting capacity for passenger occupation.
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Old 08-08-2016, 09:35 PM   #15
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Were the lifeboats fully enclosed or the 'row boat' looking type? Fully enclosed lifeboats should self right but if they are the open top ones, those handles are for if it flips so you can climb up.
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Old 08-08-2016, 09:58 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtulls View Post
Were the lifeboats fully enclosed or the 'row boat' looking type? Fully enclosed lifeboats should self right but if they are the open top ones, those handles are for if it flips so you can climb up.
This is self righting, enclosed LB.

This is the type cruise ships have for passenger use. Simply passenger protection from the elements. Not roll over protection. And these do have handrails on the bottom, because they are so wide they won't come back if they turtle.
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Old 08-09-2016, 06:23 PM   #17
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Frapping is an English term to tie down securely.
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Old 08-09-2016, 08:05 PM   #18
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Cruise Ship Lifeboat Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by stubones99 View Post
Frapping is an English term to tie down securely.

Dig deeper. Both terms are 'lifeboat arresting, securing gear' while on the davits.
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Old 08-12-2016, 10:56 PM   #19
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Z drive on a lifeboat? HAHA that was pretty funny....

Also the days of frapping lines and tricing pendants are gone. The only thing they have are gripes. Some self release and others are released by releasing a pelican hook before boarding. None the less, everyone loads up then you launch the boat from inside.
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:49 PM   #20
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Bottom hand rails are for holding on to when boat is over turned. I've been in a ship wreck.
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