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Old 06-19-2015, 10:34 AM   #141
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dash some water on your exhaust manifold while underway? that would probably crack the manifold... never mind.
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Old 06-19-2015, 10:53 AM   #142
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ROFLMAO!!! Say it ain't so!!! Did Ollie move in next door?

"Batten the hatches....stow the foot wear! There's a storm heading this way!!"
No, not Ollie but I don't trust any of them now.
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Old 06-19-2015, 11:01 AM   #143
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This is my mental picture of a "cottage on the water":


I love it!!!!
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Old 06-19-2015, 12:30 PM   #144
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Well, that one certainly surprised us. A sauna? We have one. It's called outdoors. I've never really understood the appeal of a sauna anyway so will just have to trust you on that one.
You have to spend a little time cruising in the PNW to understand the sauna. Here we don't get the need for AC. the water is usually in the low to mid 50s. The early mornings and many evenings call for heat particularly above desolation sound. By mid day 60s to 70s most of the time with glorious scenery. Off season lots of cool drizzle parts of the day a great time to turn on the sauna. This year is a little unusual a lot warmer dryer earlier is it climate warming??
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Old 06-19-2015, 12:55 PM   #145
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You have to spend a little time cruising in the PNW to understand the sauna. Here we don't get the need for AC. the water is usually in the low to mid 50s. The early mornings and many evenings call for heat particularly above desolation sound. By mid day 60s to 70s most of the time with glorious scenery. Off season lots of cool drizzle parts of the day a great time to turn on the sauna. This year is a little unusual a lot warmer dryer earlier is it climate warming??
I have cruised in the PNW and Alaska, although not in winter. I did go to Seatlle in winter. I've lived in colder climates. I've been in a sauna. Not my cup of tea and just was surprised with that answer. Obviously a lot of people love them. But then we love hot tubs and jacuzzi's and many people don't like them, just see them as fancy bathtubs.
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:27 PM   #146
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I would like a cedar lined sauna please. If my next boat were 10 feet longer maybe.
I find that saunas zap the energy from me.

I much prefer a steam bath, then a good massage afterwards,...lots of massages in Thailand....everywhere
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:31 PM   #147
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This is my mental picture of a "cottage on the water":
How about this one,...a little neater
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:42 PM   #148
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Don-- In looking at photos on the web it looks like the Uniflite 28' Mega is what my friend had in Hawaii We fitted a stainless plate to the cockpit sole for reinforcing and mounted a fighting chair on it. I never saw the boat out of the water so don't know if it had the lifting strikes on the hull or not.
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Old 06-19-2015, 02:19 PM   #149
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What an interesting thread... And as for Sheworthy news? Well, it certainly got your attention, didn't it? And reading it proved the marketers correct. People of both genders are interested.

Boat sellers used to be male-centric. When shopping for Seaweed MANY brokers would not answer queries from Janice. When I would resend the note (exact same!) signing Janice (and Frank) I'd get a response.

Meet Frank:


I "played the game" and got what I wanted, i.e. information about various boats I might buy. By the same token, let a male walk into a quilting shop and he'll be ignored just as rapidly as I am at a marine hardware store. At past fifty with grey hair and a dog in my purse I certainly don't fit the preconceived notions of a boater.

BandB prefer to go fast. There was a time I didn't understand. No, I didn't criticize ('to each their own') however I wondered that they might be missing the experience I enjoy. Then I rode in Little Manatee and gosh, it was wonderful. To fly across the river versus putting along with my trolling motor? Well, I'm sold.

No, I'm not replacing my trolling motor except with another, however I can well appreciate the fun of pure speed. Do the go-fast folks look at life differently? Perhaps to a small extent however they are having fun out here, just as I am. Otherwise their resources would go elsewhere.

Now my boatcard used to say Admiral. That's because of Daddy. One day he was at a yardsale and found a brass sign that said Captain. He bought it, brought it home and screwed it to his chair in the saloon.

Mother said nothing. She did go hunting however and found one that said Admiral. She too said nothing and bolted hers to the same spot on her chair as Daddy had on his.

If you think about it the Admiral decides where to go. It's up to the bridge crew to make sure they arrive safely at the destination. I decide where to go, thus I am the Admiral. I'm also in the bilges fixing stuff, but somehow Fixer-Of-What's-Broken on my boat card didn't fit.

I'd rather be the Admiral. As Captain I am always concerned with the engine, sounds, course steered, and more. It's not nearly as relaxing as being a passenger. Oh it's fun too and the satisfaction of a day underway cannot be underrated however it is Work.

There is a much higher level of stress when it's all your baby and your decisions. I second guess often. Each choice has seemed logical and correct at the time however the benefit of retrospect has led me to a few conclusions where I wish I'd opted differently. Such is life, eh?

And I do refer to wives as the Better Half. There is no offense intended though I suppose some might be put off by my old-fashioned terminology. Tone online is on occasion misconstrued and I would hope that my words do not offend. There is certainly no malice involved.

I assume the best in folks and the joking around? Well, no one is guaranteed not to be offended. All are promised free reign to speak though having an audience is another matter entirely.

When discussing earlier trash compactors versus dishwashers, I did have a thought: Whenever I open a container I do not just toss the empty container in the trash bag. Instead I fill it -- stuffed to the gills so to speak. You'd be surprised how much trash can be put into an empty box or jar.

Garbage rots and smells bad, whereas trash doesn't stink. Thus, garbage is tossed over the side and fish will eat it. Egg shells and pan scrapings, leftovers and stale crackers are fish or crab food and don't make it to shore.

As for comforts of home? Well, Seaweed is my home and I do expect a level of decadence. What I would tolerate and even enjoy at thirty is out of the question now. I want a bunk that is squishy, a refrigerator I can run 24/7 off the grid and more.

This is home and I've been aboard her for seven years. She's improving.

The passagemakers are a different breed. The owners need and expect more. A boat with full access to the Holy Space components for repairs underway is a given. That the galley is able to put out decent food to keep the captain and crew happy is also not up for compromise. And the owner's cabin WILL be comfortable.

Crew aboard such a boat if there is any, will too wish for a higher standard of living than on a day sailer.

But I have to tell you, some of those little weekender boats are pretty spiffy. What they lack for the most part is storage space and engine access. Of course too, the quality of components isn't top of the line.

That said, I've been using a totally inadequate (but paid for) $70 Haier cube refrigerator on and off since 2008. It still works. Would an Engel be better? You betcha. And at $600 or more dollars, it SHOULD be better. What I have though is Good Enough.

I'm not crossing oceans. There's no reason to have a displacement hulled trawler to poke along a coast. Just as my boat isn't made for crossing oceans, those deep draft blue water sailboats wouldn't be able to enjoy the nooks and rivers I can get into.

Different boats. Different styles.
And all of them are right for Someone.

My Seaweed is not the correct choice for most. That doesn't matter in the least to me. She's perfect for me, and that's what counts.

I'll quit now and give your eyes a rest.
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Old 06-19-2015, 02:45 PM   #150
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FWIW, Janice, the results of a long-term study here in Puget Sound showed that fish and crabs do not, for the most part, eat the garbage boaters throw overboard. Banana peels, melon rinds, etc sink to the bottom where they DO feed the algae that deplete the water of oxygen. This, in turn, depletes the population of fish, crabs, etc.

Where this plays a significant role is in bays, estuaries, fjords, etc with a relatively low water turnover. Here in Puget Sound it's a concern because the water turnover is very slow, particularly in the south sound and Hood Canal. For example, I believe the time it takes for a complete water exchange in Hood Canal (which is a long, natural inlet, not a man-made canal) is one year.

Boater garbage is certainly not as great a contributor to oxygen depletion and algae blooms as other, more dramatic causes. But, as the study concluded, every bit contributes no matter how small or seemingly insignificant it may seem.

Now, a lot of boaters don't care about this sort of thing. Out of sight, out of mind, right? What I found interesting about the study is that my assumption that all that stuff we tossed overboard assuming it was fish and crab food actually isn't. Some of it is, of course, but apparently most of it is not, particularly once it hits the bottom.

The story in the paper about the study concluded with the recommendation that boaters not throw garbage overboard but dispose of it ashore. It's no big deal for us to do that so we do now. But for others, particularly full-time cruisers it may be more hassle than they deem worth.
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Old 06-19-2015, 03:33 PM   #151
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Wifey B: I did communicate in private with KK to express my feelings. I understand their reasoning and I appreciate their response. I don't think they're evil or anything for doing it. It wouldn't keep me from buying one. My hubby did want to know if it was legal for him to read the Sheworthy newsletters. But I do have one comment to emphasize my displeasure of the word "Sheworthy" itself. I say this because much of what they're calling sheworthy is novice worthy, nothing to do with one's sex. Pick any other group, I'll use the legal term, any other "Protected Group" and would it be acceptable? What about "blackworthy" or "jewishworthy"? Of course, you shouldn't and wouldn't dare and they would be far more objectionable. I just don't like that label but I'm fine with those of you who have no problem with it.

Now, me, I'm both heworthy and sheworthy....hehe
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Old 06-19-2015, 05:18 PM   #152
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I find that saunas zap the energy from me.

I much prefer a steam bath, then a good massage afterwards,...lots of massages in Thailand....everywhere
My sauna at home is definitely steam and I would not except less on a boat. I get no massage my wife of 52+ years is developing arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome.
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Old 06-19-2015, 06:19 PM   #153
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My sauna at home is definitely steam and I would not except less on a boat. I get no massage my wife of 52+ years is developing arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Wifey B: 52+ years...omg so nice.
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Old 06-19-2015, 06:35 PM   #154
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This is another 'water cottage' I would love to live on.

Roi Soleil
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Old 06-19-2015, 09:19 PM   #155
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FWIW, Janice, the results of a long-term study here in Puget Sound showed that fish and crabs do not, for the most part, eat the garbage boaters throw overboard. Banana peels, melon rinds, etc sink to the bottom where they DO feed the algae that deplete the water of oxygen. This, in turn, depletes the population of fish, crabs, etc.
I've always recalled the comment by the Scripps biologist John D. Isaacs, that we steal so much protein from the ocean, and then so carefully make inedible what we put back in via sewage treatment.

Personally, I don't think animal material in the ocean persists for long, but I do agree that still waters demand discretion, so I limit it completely when docked.
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Old 06-19-2015, 11:13 PM   #156
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Marin's comments do bear repeating: "FWIW, Janice, the results of a long-term study here in Puget Sound showed that fish and crabs do not, for the most part, eat the garbage boaters throw overboard. Banana peels, melon rinds, etc sink to the bottom where they DO feed the algae that deplete the water of oxygen. This, in turn, depletes the population of fish, crabs, etc.

Where this plays a significant role is in bays, estuaries, fjords, etc with a relatively low water turnover. Here in Puget Sound it's a concern because the water turnover is very slow, particularly in the south sound and Hood Canal. For example, I believe the time it takes for a complete water exchange in Hood Canal (which is a long, natural inlet, not a man-made canal) is one year."

I had not considered that previously and will make sure I don't advocate overboard in areas where water flow is slow. It's something I had not even thought about before, so thank you for the education.

May I quote you in an upcoming article on my website? I'd send you a private message but I don't think you get those... (With apologies to the board for barging in, etc.)

What you say is important and I will add an Addendum to a couple articles already online, with your permission of course.

Janice (and please do let me know "yes" or "no") plus name you prefer. (Most opt for first name/boat name or full name/boat name.

Please say yes.
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Old 06-20-2015, 04:11 AM   #157
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Janice-- Yes, I have the private message function of the forum turned off. Feel free to pass on the information I posted. However make sure it's understood that I was simply summarizing the results of a study that I read about in the local paper, I believe it was the Seattle Times. I myself am not any sort of authority on the subject.
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Old 06-20-2015, 02:42 PM   #158
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Done, and thank you. The beauty of online publishing is the ability to post Addendums. Accuracy counts and goodness knows I've not been in areas where water flow was restricted -- I just never considered same before now.

Thank you Marin.

And now back to our cottage on the water topic.
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Old 06-20-2015, 03:47 PM   #159
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Done, and thank you. The beauty of online publishing is the ability to post Addendums. Accuracy counts and goodness knows I've not been in areas where water flow was restricted -- I just never considered same before now.

Thank you Marin.

And now back to our cottage on the water topic.
In our land "cottage" we never put a lot of value in a trash compactor as the "garbage men" just picked up however much you put out. On the boat, we wouldn't live without it now that we've used one. Now once we got use to one on the boat, we started using one at home regularly. Unfortunately, they are not cheap and the less expensive trash crushers, etc. don't accomplish much. I thought by now the price of trash compactors would have dropped far more. I guess I thought of them like paper shredders which are only a fraction of the cost they once were.
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Old 06-20-2015, 05:08 PM   #160
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Thank you Marin.

And now back to our cottage on the water topic.
Well, turnabout's fair play. I told my wife about your putting trash in empty food cans to save space and she thought that was a great idea. She does it at home, filling empy milk cartons with old napkins, paper, etc. to save sapce in the recycling bin. But she'd never thought of using the cans we open on the boat for the same purpose. So thanks for that one.
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