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Old 07-13-2013, 02:03 AM   #1
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Conundrum- Buy Now? or Buy Later?

Good evening! Lurker here trying to learn as much as possible.... Significant other is 9 months from retirement. Our Plan is to sell the house and go cruising for 5- X? years. We are still researching trawlers to do the Loop and other east coast cruising.... then maybe to the west coast. Lofty plans for folks who are landlocked and dream of the cursing live-aboard life style....

In these 9 months or so ahead.....

Question:

Do we find, buy the boat and store it till retirement? probably somewhere on the east coast.... OR

Do we wait till actual retirement then buy the boat?

I read there are LOTS of boats out there. I read that it may take us time to find the right one. OR we might find the right boat easily.

Thanks for all your input and guidance.
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Old 07-13-2013, 02:55 AM   #2
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Personally I'd start the process now as 9 months is about how long it will realistically take to locate and close on your boat. Depending on how far you are in research of course as everyone has a different situation.
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Old 07-13-2013, 05:21 AM   #3
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Try tio get more experience ,and do a lot of reading.

The "right boat" will be a delight but you have to refine your desirements.

Mostly its deciding on a cruising lifestyle.

You can run from marina to marina and the search for a boat will be easy as there are endless dock queens that will work fine.

You can chose independance , to anchor out mostly , as the sail folks do .

Then the systems will be 98% different , so the boat will be way harder to find.

Its always better to find a traveling machine where most of the setup for your preferred lifestyle is already operating.

But first YOU have to decide on the lifestyle.

Should you decide on offshore voyaging plan on spending 300% more for probably a smaller boat.
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Old 07-13-2013, 07:16 AM   #4
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9 Months? You should be seriously looking now!

I started over 2 years before my earliest possible retirement date.

I still have a year and a half to get the boat to where I want it. And I'm starting to wonder if that's going to be enough time.
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Old 07-13-2013, 07:59 AM   #5
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Get some experience before you go on your adventure.
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Old 07-13-2013, 08:41 AM   #6
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There is one boat on either side of us in Oriental NC that are long distance boat owners. One is from Kansas and the other from Nebraska. Both come every couple of months and stay a week or so. The Island Packet on our starboard (Nebraska) is cruising the Chesapeake this summer. He came a week before his wife and got stuff ready....then off they went.

My point is, that lots of boats over here have owners that are landlocked. It doesn't mean you can't have your boat. There is a whole industry of people that will keep up your boat for a fee...you just have to find someone you trust.

My opinion is, get started now! Life is short. Start having fun!
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:18 PM   #7
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Something to consider is finding yourself a good buyer's broker. A good one will help you refine your requirements along the way, and also help you with the search process and ultimately the purchase. This is a free service for you as the sales commission comes out of the seller's pocket.

But has already been mentioned, get on board lots of boats - the devil is in the details as they say, and until you actually explore various vessels you won't know if you like certain galley layouts, saloon settee arrangements, helm setups, engine room access etc.

But you need to start now. Treat it as a second job.
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Old 07-13-2013, 03:45 PM   #8
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First question is why a "trawler" style boat?

There is a large variety of boats that can put at 6-7K easily , many with far less maint than a TT.

What do you hope to do with the bost?

Cruising is only a small part of an answer.What is the big goal??

Long shore cruising the entire Atlantic ICW , then thru the Bahamas to the Windward Islands , along the shore to Columbia then Panama to Left coast and up to AK.

Great trip depending on your choice of lifestyle could easily be done with a 35ish gasoline powered Uniflite , about $15- 20 K for the boat in reasonable condition.

So why bigger bucks for ?????? the dreamboat.
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Old 07-13-2013, 05:50 PM   #9
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FF: I don't understand some of what you ask.

Trawler? That is what my research says is economical coastal cruiser for doing the America's Great Loop, provide space for our selves, and enjoy living aboard in a new lifestyle. We are not sailors. We do want some creature comforts.... head, shower, galley, roof, wheel, motor. Things like that.

We are researching mostly the "name brand" boats. I do not know the Uniflite brand. Since I haven't mentioned our budget, your assertion seems curious.

What is our goal? I think I mentioned it already.... cruising into retirement until one of us says...whoa that's enough for me. We are 'planning' at least 10 years. But health, weather, family, etc. may always change our future plans as it would almost anything in life.

We are researching. And in the process of 'simplifying' our life...which is another way of saying 'getting rid of stuff' to make the final transition easy.

Thank you all.
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Old 07-13-2013, 06:40 PM   #10
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Uniflite was a popular yet now defunct brand of boats. If I may be so bold the questions posed by FF are more philosophical in nature and quite relevant for anyone in the market for a boat irrespective of ones budget.

There are some that feel you must spend "X" amount of money to get a boat with "X" amount of capabilities and "X" amount of feet long with a certain type kind of features to have an effective cruising boat. His $15- 20 K Uniflite example quite effectively and rightly so debunks those myths. The trip he cited in his example above has a maximum distance between safe ports of about 250 miles verified by others who have made those exact same journeys on this forum.

There are hundreds of boat styles capable of making all or any part of that journey, it is up to the future cruising couple to define what is really important to them in way of boat to make said journeys.

Define your entire mission first and then find the boat that fulfills "your" mission, not someone else's agenda. It's too easy to get wrapped around the axle about brand names when condition is what's most important, even brand new boats can have deficiencies. There are some doing the loop quite comfortably on boats most people wouldn't feel comfortable on for a day trip.
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Old 07-13-2013, 11:56 PM   #11
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OneofSix,
I`m with the "start NOW!" school of thought.
The hard part is finding the right boat from many for sale. The wrong one may again become one of many for sale. Getting it right, once, is good. Except if depending on experience, you rather start with something less than your ultimate boat, learning more, trading up in time.
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:28 AM   #12
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I normally stay the heck out of these discussions because there are nearly endless possibilites.

However, this is not a new suggestion, seriously consider chartering a boat similar to what you THINK you want. If you have no boat knowledge/skills then you have no basis for comparisons.

Often what appear to be an attractive offering, will in reality after some use, turn out to be less than ideal, unless you really have something to compare to first.

You may have to take a handling course and I would suggest a Power Squadron or similar course before a charterer will allow you out with one of their boats but it will be time and money well spent.

For long term use storage will be important.

FF has good points. Depending upon budget and intended use there are lots of boats other than so called 'trawlers' that will do well depending upon what you want from them.

Also if you haven't found this thread then look it up:
http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...oat-10856.html
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Old 07-14-2013, 06:00 AM   #13
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"turn out to be less than ideal,"

What I' looking for is the posters concept of Ideal.

I think he should purchase a copy of Dave Pascoes book before spending a dime.

Always a great place to start ,

Yacht Survey Online: David Pascoe, Marine Surveyor

www.yachtsurvey.com/‎
www.yachtsurvey.com There are over 150 articles on buying, owning and maintaining boats, written by myself based on experience in surveying over 5000 ...Boat Reviews - ‎Marine Engines - ‎Articles - ‎Buying Used, Older Boats


Boat Reviews by David Pascoe, Marine Surveyor - Index

www.yachtsurvey.com/boatreviews/indexboatreview.htm‎
Sep 1, 2012 - Boat reviews - These are reviews, not surveys, and bear no resemblance to our survey reports. We do not publish the results of the surveys that ...
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Old 07-14-2013, 02:51 PM   #14
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Actually, we are reading and re-reading one of the David Pascoe books. Lots of good general information. I used the term Trawler generically... trawler, motor yacht, fishing yachts. We are planning on going slow and take our time to see the sites, sunsets and sunrises in new parts of the USA that we haven't seen before.

I asked a question on another thread but I am going to repeat it here:

1) Do you sign a contract with a Buyer's Broker or is it a hand shake deal? I guess the question is exclusivity. If I make a hand-shake deal with a buyer's broker am I committed to deal exclusively thru that person? OR can I seek deals on my own?

2) Secondly, if the Buyer's Broker you have committed to is listing boats, who does the Buyer's Broker owe priority to? The seller or me- the buyer?
For example: the BB lists a boat for 200K. I want to offer 150K. Will the BB negotiate a lower price for ME? or stick to the 200K for the seller? I don't know what to expect.

Thanks.
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Old 07-14-2013, 08:59 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by OneofSix View Post

2) Secondly, if the Buyer's Broker you have committed to is listing boats, who does the Buyer's Broker owe priority to? The seller or me- the buyer?
For example: the BB lists a boat for 200K. I want to offer 150K. Will the BB negotiate a lower price for ME? or stick to the 200K for the seller? I don't know what to expect.
I can`t see how that Broker resolves the conflict of his duty to the Seller and his duty to you as Buyers Broker. I would treat him as a Sellers Broker and, if you still want a Buyers Broker, retain someone else.
But then I think a Buyers Broker getting paid from the Selling Brokers commission, being effectively paid by the Seller, is conflicted. Your brokerage system must rely heavily on the integrity of your brokers.
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Old 07-15-2013, 05:47 AM   #16
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The "handshake" of an offer is YOUR check to the broker,A $200,000 boat you wish to offer $175,000 for after you pay for a survey and wish to negotiate on the results,would require a check for 17,500 .

This works as a HUGE lever as the broker has his commission in hand will work really hard to seal the deal.

IF your offer is refused , you get your check back.
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Old 07-17-2013, 07:29 AM   #17
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I agree that you should charter a boat to get a feel for what you want and need. Determine your budget. Plan your realistic goals. Then have fun shopping! My wife and I bought a 28 foot boat four years ago, joined a yacht club north of Seattle, and after three years of cruises ranging from three days to two weeks we bought a 47-foot pilothouse. When we retire in about five years we plan to cruise the Inside Passage from the Puget Sound to Southern Alaska.

We bought a coastal cruiser, and there is no way I would run her down the West Coast to SoCal or Mexico. A blue-water cruiser would have cost us 2-3 times more, and I don't want to run in 20 foot seas. I have been in 8 foot swells (16 feet from trough to peak) and I will never willingly do that again!

We bought a well-equipped boat and have spent nine months adding hydronic heat and fixing lots and lots of minor issues that could have been big issues. You never know what previous owners may have done. The PO of my boat paid a well-known yard to upgrade many systems, and here is a little of what I have had to correct. The flybridge GPS is not connected to the DSC radio, so DSC doesn't work; they rebuilt the davit, then lubed the nylon bearings with petroleum, causing the bearings to swell and bind; they re-wired the house bank batteries but left bare copper wire exposed on every connection. All bare copper has corroded and some wires have cracked, so all had to be replaced. That's the tip of the iceberg. On the other hand I have found several great mechanics and avoided many not so great mechanics by talking extensively with other yacht club members as well as frequenting sites like this.

If you buy a good used boat plan on spending a year learning and fixing all of your systems and getting comfortable navigating and piloting. Spend lots of time getting good at close quarters maneuvering and docking. Too many owners neglect this and marriages get strained when a couple screams at each other while trying to bring their boat in.

My wife loves negotiating and is good at it. We spent months on yachtworld.com looking at boats, spent time on friends's boats, and decided what we wanted. When we found boats that we liked we made offers through the seller's broker. The first three boats we made offers on countered our offers with unrealistic numbers, so we walked. The fourth boat we made an offer on, the broker knew who we were, knew he would get both ends of the commission, and gave the seller advice on accepting our offer. By carefully shopping, buying in the fall, and knowing the actual sales price of the last six comparable boats, we bought our boat at a solid 20% below market.

Wow, sorry for the long post! There are so many variables in your equation there are dozens of decision points for you. We learned so much in our $20,000 28 foot boat that helped us transition to our 48 foot yacht. You may not want to spend a few years doing that. Make friends with people living the life you want to have. Spend a few weekends with them on their boats, pay for all the food, booze and fuel, and learn how to dock a boat. You'll find out quickly what you will want in your own boat. Good luck!
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Old 07-17-2013, 02:39 PM   #18
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The "handshake" of an offer is YOUR check to the broker,A $200,000 boat you wish to offer $175,000 for after you pay for a survey and wish to negotiate on the results,would require a check for 17,500 .

This works as a HUGE lever as the broker has his commission in hand will work really hard to seal the deal.

IF your offer is refused , you get your check back.
Sorry, I too am looking to get into a trawler in the very near future and am here to learn, am I to understand that an offer requires a deposit up front? I can only go by (6) houses bought and sold but no offer required an actual check along with it. Is it different with boats? Yes, I did eventually put deposits down on all the houses (usually $5k) but that was after the offer had been made and accepted.
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Old 07-17-2013, 03:53 PM   #19
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Sorry, I too am looking to get into a trawler in the very near future and am here to learn, am I to understand that an offer requires a deposit up front? I can only go by (6) houses bought and sold but no offer required an actual check along with it. Is it different with boats? Yes, I did eventually put deposits down on all the houses (usually $5k) but that was after the offer had been made and accepted.
Welcome to buying a boat. Yes they make you give a check WITH the offer, usually 10%. Why? what I have heard is because the next step after the offer is accepted is a sea trial and if they did not require you to put money on it, they'd have ppl making offers right and left to get a ride on a boat they really don't plan to buy. Not sure how much truth there is to that??? Would love to hear the broker's perspective on the reasoning behind it.
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Old 07-17-2013, 04:14 PM   #20
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I have never bought a boat through a broker, but I would think Pineapple girl is correct. Keep the tirekickers separated from the serious buyers.
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