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Old 02-10-2013, 06:32 AM   #61
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A 92 page PDF can be e-mailed with no issues.
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:40 AM   #62
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"Storm windows and/or thicker glass can alleviate the points you bring up."

Loads harder to reinforce the SIDES of the PH and the joint where the PH attaches to the deck.

A missing 4ft by 4 ft window is less hassle than a 30ft long 1/2 inch seperiation of the cabin from the deck.

Being swept from aft is less of a problem as only a beams width of water is aboard , far lighter than a beam sea and water the length of the boat.

"A big following sea and losing rudder control is more of a concern IMHO."

This is a CREW responsibility, changing course , heading into rather than running, or towing a drogue ( an old truck tire or two in 300 ft of line) , lots of methods to avoid a loss of control, and a broach.

The problem of insufficient construction for ocean passages is usually not repairable by the crew.Ashore or underway.

An inshore boat is different from an ocean capable boat , regardless of an advertising brochure claims.
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Old 02-10-2013, 03:03 PM   #63
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Any of the Nordhavn's from 40' on up can and have done full ocean crossings. On their web site you can read about a 40', a 46', and I think a 43'. As the size goes up, so does the comfort level, and of course the price. Also, the larger boats can make a crossing faster. To get the needed range out of the smaller boats, you have to go pretty slow (6-7 kts). An N60 can do a 2000nm crossing @ 9kts with 20% fuel reserve.

Aside from range and durability, there other aspects of the systems that are important like fuel transfer systems, polishing systems, supply (aka "day") tanks, thick glass, storm plates, a bridge that can be kept dark while other parts of the boat are in normal use, proper electronics including suitable redundancy and backups, etc, etc.

Like with any type of boat, there are a wide range of tradeoffs that can be made around comfort, speed, safety risk, convenience, and of course cost.
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Old 02-10-2013, 06:58 PM   #64
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A big following sea and losing rudder control is more of a concern IMHO. Storm windows and/or thicker glass can alleviate the points you bring up.
When we sailed offshore we always carried a para anchor intended to be deployed off a bridle if we had to "pull of the road", but after correspondence with a gentleman with quite a bit of experience in the area, including running a trawler in a hurricane, I've settled on a Sea Brake as a sensible way of handling downwind running before a front in a powered vessel. Used properly, this device would seem to provide a fair amount of comfort in high seas, and and offer a way to maintain control in the event of a rudder failure.

Seabrake
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:29 PM   #65
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There`s a surprise, Seabrake, an Australian designed product. The manufacturer, Burke, was started by Martin Burke,originally a sail maker, who made and repaired sails for my sturdy Folkboat, and has added a range of marine products, like clothing, bags, safety gear, etc.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:12 AM   #66
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"An N60 can do a 2000nm crossing @ 9kts with 20% fuel reserve."

GREAT! about 1/2 of the range may be required on a Pacific adventure.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:22 AM   #67
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"An N60 can do a 2000nm crossing @ 9kts with 20% fuel reserve."

GREAT! about 1/2 of the range may be required on a Pacific adventure.
I used 2000nm as a comparison point since that's the number that was being thrown around earlier. Another comparison point for the pacific would be the Galapagos to the Marquessas which is about 2800nm. The same boat can make that crossing at 8.5kts. Slow to 8kts and the range goes up to 3900nm. Slow to 7.5kts and it's 4500nm.

But I guess I'm not sure what your point is? Are you saying something can't be done, or that there is a better way to do it?
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:17 AM   #68
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There`s a surprise, Seabrake, an Australian designed product. The manufacturer, Burke, was started by Martin Burke,originally a sail maker, who made and repaired sails for my sturdy Folkboat, and has added a range of marine products, like clothing, bags, safety gear, etc.
Yes, those Aussies are a clever lot....

The English gentleman I corresponded with that had hurricane experience with the Sea Brake swore by it. Said that with following seas in the 10 meter range (he said) with apparent wind of 85-100 knots he did 4 - 5 knots under quite satisfactory control dead downwind. I wasn't there, but his experience does seem to map to Burke's claims.
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:50 AM   #69
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[QUOTE=markpierce;133425]My (louvered) engine vents are on the pilothouse sides. I suppose a thin, bottomless "boxes" could be installed to reduce possible water entering during heavy seas.


engine vents , we put them on the side of the cabin , and inside they have a "chicane" like you can see here
http://long-cours.62.over-blog.com/photo-1911172-prises-d-air-001_jpg.html
but for the next one we will put them on the center line they could be floaded llittle later .
Actualy it is little before 90 heel
It is less than our Avs
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Old 10-08-2013, 09:36 PM   #70
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Get a copy of "Voyaging Under Power", hopefully a first edition and it will tell you most of what you want to know. I read mine maybe 3-4 times, and use it as a reference book.
Just opened my brand new fourth edition VUP hard cover from Amazon. I had read the library's copy of the third edition and really enjoyed it, but I can tell already the fourth edition is a major overhaul. The book is textbook quality and has significantly more content that the previous edition. Really glad I opted for a hard cover versus the ebook - it was cheaper, and I know I'm going to be reading and rereading and referencing this book for many years.

This is me signing off for a few days as I tear through the fourth edition for the first time!
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Old 10-08-2013, 09:57 PM   #71
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The 4th Ed is ok, but frankly I was disappointed in it. He is a bit out of date, or biased, or both, in some areas. A whole bunch of people on this forum are more valuable.
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