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Old 06-08-2016, 08:12 AM   #41
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This is a great thread filled with lots of good info, thanks to everyone who posted. I also see a teak job in my future
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Old 06-08-2016, 09:12 AM   #42
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I second that great information being shared, thanks!
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Old 06-11-2016, 10:05 PM   #43
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The deck level work is rounding the corner...

Larry M mentioned a sealer so I thought I would give it a try also (with all due respect to the capitalistic system - the price of that stuff is just wrong).

I like the outcome ok, but when the surface was wet - I noticed that some of the seams that looked ok dry looked cracked. Will have to back track to recaulk.

Also... some spots are a bit smooth - may not do final sanding with 120-grit on the flybridge.

Results with the sealer are spectacular.
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Old 07-02-2016, 08:49 AM   #44
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Ok, time to move to the fly bridge.

Seems the total square feet on the fly bridge is greater than at deck level. Fly bridge may take six of my work days to complete.

Refining the process too... it seems harder to sand down the caulking than the teak - so up here the caulk is being cut out first. The constricted areas between the settees and console are hard to muscle the old caulk out... for that matter the caulk is slightly easier to remove when both sides are cut with a razor knife.

Sanding is being done with 40 or 60-grit material depending on availability.

The transformation from aged material to a gorgeous fresh surface is an absolute miracle. What a wonderful natural sustainable material teak is.
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Old 07-02-2016, 12:20 PM   #45
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A slight correction, teak is nearly extinct as a wild tree, there are really only plantations to get teak from. Wild Burmese teak is a wonderful wood, but very elusive.

Also, not to be too curmudgeonly about this but failed seams allow the water to get under the planks and eventually find its way into a screw hole. Then it gets into the substrate which will turn to mush and totally shed any structural strength. Wet wood inside the boat breeds mould and mildew which are (apart from the stink) serious health hazards. Sadly, lots of the Taiwanese boats have crap wood, old pallets and other junk inside the fibreglass so getting that "structure" wet will result in decks and cabin walls being full of mush. A wet deck can migrate into the walls as the woodrot spreads resulting in major surgery to get it all out and provide needed strength. The good news is the hulls are very good. The bad news is that once the rot gets into the decks you will untimately need to remove the decks, cut off the fibreglass, reinstall plywood to provide strength and reglass the decks for waterproofness.

A lot of the interior woodwork, as beautiful as it is, is made with veneers which are impossible to save if they are damaged by water stains. If you are ever looking for a Taiwanese boat and you find one that has been painted inside, unless the owner shows you a loooong bill to prove remediation, run away.

Think of the flaw in this concept - make a nice waterproof deck then drill 2000 holes in it then expect ALL the holes to be successfully plugged...

Right.
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Old 07-02-2016, 12:32 PM   #46
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One more comment, teak sealer may make the deck slippery with certain shoes, beware that you have removed one of the best characteristics of teak decks, their excellent non-skid properties.

Only ever wash your teak decks with salt water and maybe a bit of very mild soap, (you dont want to dissolve the natural oils in the wood) use a very soft brush and only scrub across the grain. This seems counter-intuitive as most marine grime needs scrubbing but strong scrubbing removes the soft wood between the grain and then you will find that the decks are not level and you will be tempted to sand them again.

Navy ships and cruise ships used an abrasive (holystone) on their decks, largely to remove the tar that dripped off the rigging; when the decks got too thin they went into the yards and the company/taxpayer bought new decks.
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Old 07-02-2016, 02:33 PM   #47
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"Went with tape for the third method of doing the re-caulk. Tape takes longer but the instant clean edges are better."

This is the way to go. You'll get better and faster applying the tape the more you do it.
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Old 07-02-2016, 08:50 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by CarlinLA View Post

Refining the process too... it seems harder to sand down the caulking than the teak - so up here the caulk is being cut out first. The constricted areas between the settees and console are hard to muscle the old caulk out... for that matter the caulk is slightly easier to remove when both sides are cut with a razor knife.
I use a smal hand plane to remove the caulking. Goes very fast once you get the plane set up right.
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Old 07-02-2016, 10:06 PM   #49
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Yep, I'm all over that taping method.

Love it.

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Originally Posted by alormaria View Post
"Went with tape for the third method of doing the re-caulk. Tape takes longer but the instant clean edges are better."

This is the way to go. You'll get better and faster applying the tape the more you do it.
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Old 07-16-2016, 07:43 PM   #50
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Another Day and more progress...

Work on the flybridge continues.

Now on those narrow side decks...

Normal stuff now... getting into a rhythm of the work:

razor knife the old caulk, use Teak Decking Systems tool to remove old caulk;
use 60-grit paper on orbital sander with vacuum cleaner attached - remove down to clean fresh wood;
sweep and clean remaining old caulk now easily visible in clean deck surface;
tape edges of grooves with masking tape;
squeeze in TDS 440 caulk, tool flat, remove tape;
backtrack (lightly) sand with 60-grit to clean areas of caulk not friendly to fast taping;
coat with sealer.

Take Tylenol and aspirin.

Did the Port side today... Starboard on the next visit...

BTW - that curious white splotchy stuff on the freshly caulked photo is the adhesive from the tape... did not use painters tape - none in stock at the store I went to... had to use regular masking tape - the adhesive is a little aggressive... hope it sands off on the final sanding... (it should)...
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Old 07-16-2016, 07:46 PM   #51
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I did learn something...

That nasty TDS 440 caulk that gets on your hands when peeling tape comes off like (weird) magic with a Lysol wet-wipe...
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Old 07-16-2016, 09:36 PM   #52
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Interesting. Our Fu Hwa does not have those large tapered areas of deck sealant; ours are tapered Teak or even 'nibbed' into the edging board (not the correct name, on a real planked deck, it's the covering board {I think[!]}). Some of your teak is 'nibbed' while some others are not...why, I wonder?

The tape goo can be cleaned with any of: lacquer thinner, goo gone, paint thinner, sanding off. Very annoying to find that you did not get it all; after a year the stuff might be found to be collecting dirt.

Also interesting, our flybridge Teak is not nearly so neatly done as the main deck.
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Old 07-16-2016, 09:49 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oscar View Post
You see, once the water is in the core, slamming the door behind it won't stop the rot. Because it won't dry out. And, if you can FEEL it it's bad. The rot is usually spread well beyond that. The good news is that it won't sink the boat, so as long as you don't get potholes in the deck to trip over and the cabin is dry......
FWIW, a temporary/permanent repair that works for small areas of rot is to use CPES slow-cure and let it wick down and replace the water and moisture in the wood. You can then comeback and reseal with more epoxy and or your favorite seam sealer. If you are really concerned about stopping the dry-rot add some anti-fungicide to the CPES. Many transoms and decks have been successfully repaired using this approach.
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Old 07-16-2016, 10:07 PM   #54
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Sorry D... should have explained... those tapered areas are actually teak pieces... i was just too lazy to cut the masking tape to fit... so when I tooled the caulk into the adjacent grooves - the excess smeared across the unprotected teak.

When I do the final sanding those areas will be sanded clean and look normal.


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Originally Posted by DHeckrotte View Post
Interesting. Our Fu Hwa does not have those large tapered areas of deck sealant; ours are tapered Teak or even 'nibbed' into the edging board (not the correct name, on a real planked deck, it's the covering board {I think[!]}). Some of your teak is 'nibbed' while some others are not...why, I wonder?
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Old 07-17-2016, 07:02 AM   #55
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Ahhh Carlin, can't get lazy on this Forum.
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Old 07-24-2016, 09:13 AM   #56
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And the chase continues - but beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel so to speak...

Friday was spent taping and caulking the remaining third of the flybridge deck and Saturday was for re-sanding and sealing.

The next step - and likely the final step for me is to run a bead of white caulk around the perimeter of the teak decking... particularly at the "notches" where the aft end of the fly bridge fiberglass sides terminate. I`ll take a pic to better show those locations when they are caulked next week
.

There were a few smaller cracks in the wood... the larger of the cracks I simply caulked as if they were a seam. The smaller of the small cracks I filled with epoxy - not sure how effective the epoxy will be keeping out the water...

The mass of teak decking up top looks great freshly sanded, caulked, and coated with sealer.

Every situation is different... some people can afford to have this kind of work done for them, some people would work at a more leisurly pace, but for me - working alone on days off from work - I felt it was a fairly demanding job. Several doses of tylenol were taken for sore hands over the weeks this job took. If the boat would have been a foot longer I probably would have had to hire help.
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Old 07-24-2016, 11:27 AM   #57
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A question for you guys working on teak decks. Can you detect possible problems under the teak deck by taping with a hammer? Or does the teak mask the sound that a soft core would make? Thanks
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Old 07-30-2016, 08:43 AM   #58
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Finishing up on top...

I ran a bead of white TDS 440 around the entire edge of the teak deck.

To me - this completes the "membrane" effect...

It was so obvious that in the previous condition the water would run aft along the side of the fiberglass flybridge wing as aft is downhill - and as it pooled at the back end of the fwing - it would then flow under the teak decking.

Hopefully the bead of caulk around the edge will stop that.

Of course the upper deck has many other holes in it due to mounting of stantion rails, grab rails, devices, etc.. - but this is about as good as I can do... hope it keeps the water out.

Freshly sanded, caulked, and sealed teak is gorgeous.

I re-read many of the comments by others and it seems that dealing with your teak decks is something of a "right-of-passage"... everybody else did it too...

Guess I'm in.

Best to all...

Carl
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Old 07-30-2016, 11:01 AM   #59
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I am appreciating this thread too...I am just about to re-seam my foredeck, including deepening the caulk lines and re-seating screws (some will be removed and the holes filled with epoxy with glued bungs on top).


Two questions: did you have to deepen any caulk grooves...if yes, how did you do it?


And: what is your thinking behind using the SEMCO sealer? I have a dock neighbour who uses it and loves it. Are you using it because you want to preserve the freshly-sanded look (for 6 months or so before re-applying) or do you think it contributes to water-proofing the deck?


(OK, more than 2 questions there, but you know where I'm coming from!)
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Old 07-30-2016, 11:24 AM   #60
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Hello Aquabelle...

Yes, I had to deepen several linear feet of the grooves - which is not that much. I used a razor knife along each side of the groove and then used the (sharp) caulk removal tool to carve out the wood.

While ugly and porous, Satori's decks were in decent condition. Did not have to replace any bungs - but I have them in stock and would happily replace any that did need replacing.

SEMCO was a reference from another thread here on the forum. I understand that using the sealer make the deck more slippery. I used the sealer to somewhat preserve the fresh look of the recently sanded surface - the amount of work to get those decks in good shape warranted using "something" to preserve the effort. So even though it is more slippery, I can live with the trade-off in exchange for a longer life of the beautiful finished surface.

Beyond preserving the look - I just have a fundamental belief that any wood exposed to the elements deserves some protection - sealer seemed the minimumally invasive product to that end.

Does SEMCO make the wood more impervious? Perhaps - but to me, the half inch thick wood is plenty impervious on its own.

I'm liking that SEMCO so much I'm going to go ahead and use it on all the other wood that needs to be refinished.



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Originally Posted by Aquabelle View Post
I am appreciating this thread too...I am just about to re-seam my foredeck, including deepening the caulk lines and re-seating screws (some will be removed and the holes filled with epoxy with glued bungs on top).

Two questions: did you have to deepen any caulk grooves...if yes, how did you do it?

And: what is your thinking behind using the SEMCO sealer? I have a dock neighbour who uses it and loves it. Are you using it because you want to preserve the freshly-sanded look (for 6 months or so before re-applying) or do you think it contributes to water-proofing the deck?

(OK, more than 2 questions there, but you know where I'm coming from!)
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